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A planner -not yet

The Irish One

Member
Messages
2,267
Points
25
Hello I'm a newbie to this site- pretty cool stuff. I have been wrestling with going to a university to get a degree in Geography or Urban Studies/ PA. BUT I have decided to put my University days on hold and I'm sticking to my community college guns to get an A.A. in Surveying. I've started late with college (I'm 30) and decided I should push for a more immediate educational goal. Anyway, are there any surveyors in this forum who went on to the planning profession? Any general comments would be appreciated.
 

nerudite

Cyburbian
Messages
6,544
Points
30
I do not know any surveyors that went on to become planners... I did know a surveyor that decided to go into business for himself by developing some land he bought (and designing the subdivision himself). He made a wad of cash, but I think his subdivision was a little lacking. At the time he joked that he was a planner (as in he designed the site) and he was a developer, and therefore he was his own nemesis. But I have a feeling that this isn't what you were talking about.

In any case, welcome to cyburbia!
 

gkmo62u

Cyburbian
Messages
1,046
Points
24
Surveying is a good precursor--if thats what you want. IMO understanding LAND is critical and something many planners have no clue about. For now just make sure you ask a ton of questions of the engineers/landscape arch/planners you come into contact or work with...
 

mike gurnee

Cyburbian
Messages
3,066
Points
30
My zoning administrator has the RLS. Comes in very handy with subdivision reviews. Downside is that he is often asked to correct problems created by other surveyors. We have to remind people that he is a city employee who is a surveyor--not a "City Surveyor."
 

Cardinal

Cyburbian
Messages
10,080
Points
34
Surveying certainly would be a useful tool for a planner, in the same vein as, say, GIS. Another consideration is that it can give you a nice source of income while you complete your planning degree. Surveyors are in high demand around here, I suspect the same is true in your area. Use your contacts in that job to network with planners, developers, real estaters, and others so that you will improve your job prospects when you graduate.
 

The Irish One

Member
Messages
2,267
Points
25
Thnxs for the welcome Surveying % Geography

I took a Geography class and was basically in love with the subject. This has never happened to me in school before, it was a very new thing for me to discover I was motivated to learn about anything that has to do with school. So I started looking into different Geography programs around the country, and to my suprise not one had any kind of surveying courses. I thought there was a natural relationship between the two subjects. AND then I found GIS and once again couldn't help think that this was related to surveying as well. So Surveying here I come. I'd like to here what anyone has to say about Uni. Geography program experience. I'm not looking for the hot shot school, just a good learning experience. If one of the hot shot schools gave you that good experience, I would love to here about it. I have been looking at sdsu.edu Geography program, and I think it has a lot of great potential for me.
 

Cardinal

Cyburbian
Messages
10,080
Points
34
If its GIS that interests you, and you don't mind leaving California, you may want to check out Northern Illinois University. The GIS program there is a particularly strong one with an applications focus and strong links to regional planning agencies.
 

el Guapo

Capitalist
Messages
5,984
Points
29
Geography

I'd recommend Kansas State University. The civil engineering (Surveying), Planning and Geography departments are all within feet of each other - and in the same large building. It is normal to see students from each subject in the classes of the others. The tuition is cheap as well as the cost of living. And the education is first class. Plus Kansas has surveying reciprocity I believe -check it out for yourself though.

Either way Good Luck!

PS - between the wife and I we have six college degrees in geography!
 
Messages
3,690
Points
27
I think geography is surprisingly a very passion invoking course of study. At least to the majors in my undergrad program it was ie: my map tattoo, my classmate's map pillowcase on his favorite pillow, the varying kind of maps that wall papered all our dorm walls - geographers just love geography. a lot of planners i know parlay their MA in geography into planning, and as for surveying, our director started out surveying. keep us posted on what you decide to do.
 

boiker

Cyburbian
Messages
3,890
Points
26
Michael Stumpf said:
If its GIS that interests you, and you don't mind leaving California, you may want to check out Northern Illinois University. The GIS program there is a particularly strong one with an applications focus and strong links to regional planning agencies.
[hijack]


WOO!! NIU!!! Go HUSKIES!!!
(proud alum of that particular program)
[end hijack]
 

boiker

Cyburbian
Messages
3,890
Points
26
KMateja said:
I think geography is surprisingly a very passion invoking course of study. At least to the majors in my undergrad program it was ie: my map tattoo, my classmate's map pillowcase on his favorite pillow, the varying kind of maps that wall papered all our dorm walls - geographers just love geography. a lot of planners i know parlay their MA in geography into planning, and as for surveying, our director started out surveying. keep us posted on what you decide to do.
well, I think i new i was supposed to be a planner/gis/geography major when i found myself doodleing interchanges highways, grid systems, etc and actually creating a land-use plan for my home town..
 

Jeff

Cyburbian
Messages
4,161
Points
27
On the flip side of everyone's comments. With your surveying degree you will most likely be working for an Engineering, Surveying, and Planning firm, right?

You may want to look into the engineering side of the house, that's where all the $$ is ;)

Good luck with your career, whichever path you choose.

P.S.

There is money to be made in the Survey field if you get licensed. You aren't just limited to holding the rod. Getting to know AutoCAD will be a big help for you too.
 

The Irish One

Member
Messages
2,267
Points
25
money, money, money Thanks for all the advice : )

It's really great to be able to listen to what everybody has to say. I really appreciate it. In my world I'm all alone (boohoo poor me) when it comes to a discusion relating to anything like this.

Mike DeVuono, Civil Engineering is peeking at me from behind the Calculus, Physics, Chemistry sequence. Yikes. I like the surveying program because I take a trig class and I'm eligible for all the courses. I chose to pursue an A.A. in surveying because it's practical (I'm broke) and relates to what I'm very interested in, Geography. Also, I signed up for AutoCAD. The book- AutoCAD 2000, A Step By Step Approach is 1152 pages thick, looks interesting. LS is the goal!!!!

El Guapo, KSU, I'm on it. Thanks, 6 degrees, now thats just obsessive, I love it!

KMateja, I experience that passion. I have a serious problem with buying maps, maps, and more maps.

boiker, your enthusiastic tendencies are natural and sound very intuitive. I'm jealous, I spent years working in a place by default. I loved the people at the job but I got a quarter raise a year. I'm 30 I worked there for 13 years. OUCH!!
 
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