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A question... (And I know it'll get moved but I'm needing answers now)

Mastiff

Gunfighter
Messages
7,181
Points
30
Why do cities have FRONT setbacks? Aside from the look, do you people find some technical reason? I know in major cities they often have no setbacks, and that kind of streetscape won't work here...

So... answers?




Administrator's note - Yes, this post will be moved. You do know better ... don't post messages in off-topic areas just because you think it'll get a quicker response. Please don't do this again.
 

SW MI Planner

Cyburbian
Messages
3,195
Points
26
We don't - not in our downtown anyway. The rest of the commercial areas require a 30 foot setback. Why? Hmmm, not sure. I could probably figure it out but I get to go home now - whoopee!!
 

Chet

Cyburbian Emeritus
Messages
10,624
Points
34
Auto domination. Setbacks allow parking in driveways front of residential buildings.

Greenspace. Grass is good.

Bulk and Mass control. Not the end-all answer, but a component of controlling scale.

I'll probably add to this when I get more time.
 

Habanero

Cyburbian
Messages
3,241
Points
27
I'd have to say the same as BTurk- it's to allow for the parking and garage access (we don't see many homes with alley access anymore).
 

nerudite

Cyburbian
Messages
6,544
Points
30
The whole mass, space, light... blah blah. Or for those cities that don't do any kind of transportation planning, it's future eminent domain for when they have to put an extra lane on a residential collector. ;)
 

Cardinal

Cyburbian
Messages
10,080
Points
34
Consider one of my favorite regulations, Wisconsin's own TRANS 233, which prohibits any improvements constructed within 50 feet of the right-of-way, or 110 feet of the centerline, whichever is further from the right-of-way line, on any state highway. Oh yeah, that promotes Smart Growth, New Urbanism, and a pedestrian orientation.
 
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