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Uses Accessory use list?

Otis

Cyburbian
Messages
5,165
Points
28
Does your zoning ordinance list the accessory uses that are allowed in each zone? My city has 15 different zones, and eight of them list accessory uses in addition to permitted uses and conditional uses. It seems to me that in all zones, accessory uses are assumed and there is no need to list them. For example, if the ordinance says a restaurant is an allowed use, and further says that off-street parking is required, shouldn't a parking lot be allowed as an accessory use without being listed as an allowed accessory use?
 

DVD

Cyburbian
Messages
13,556
Points
36
Mine just has accessory uses allowed in each zone. It's up to me to be brilliant enough to determine what is accessory to what kind of use.
 

Dan

Dear Leader
Staff member
Moderator
Messages
17,441
Points
54
Old thread, I know.

The FBC I'm working on groups uses into eight categories:

* Principal - residential
* Principal - lodging
* Principal - retail / service / office
* Principal - vehicular
* Principal - industrial
* Principal - civic
* Principal - utility
* Accessory uses and single purpose structures.

Code organization is based on scale of land use, not zones. There is a use section, with a table for each use category - columns for the use name and description, each zone (checkmark if it's permitted), and conditions.

Accessory uses include:

* Antenna: radio hobbyist
* Day care: in-home (NYS has special laws regarding in-home day care)
* Donation collection box (banned)
* Drive-through facility
* Farmers market - intermittent or one-time
* Farm stand
* Home occupation
* Housing: accessory unit

There's a few more I would add, like agritourism, farmworker housing, guest room lodging (AirBnB), vending machine, wildlife rehabilitation, wind collector, woodshed, and wood boiler, but that'll be for the larger zoning code rewrite.

The code addresses parking, signs, lighting, ground-mounted mechanical equipment, dumpster and outdoor storage areas, and so on in a site improvement section.
 

Wannaplan?

Galactic Superstar
Messages
3,125
Points
26
I always thought form-based codes were meant to address scale and bulk of a development, not the use. If that's the case, then wouldn't you want to shy away from regulating accessory uses? I'm not trying to be a smarty-pants, just wondering why you wouldn't say something like, "The Principal - Residential Category is allowed to have up to 800 square feet of accessory structure(s)..."
 

Dan

Dear Leader
Staff member
Moderator
Messages
17,441
Points
54
I always thought form-based codes were meant to address scale and bulk of a development, not the use.
Not really! Most FBCs regulate use, but I think they're a great way to regulate form in rural areas that ae otherwise resisitant to use-based zoning. FBCs are more open to true mixed use, though -- in the same building (vertical mixed use), or on the same block, rather than the 1970s interpretation, where a "planned community" will have pods with single family houses on one cul-se-sac, townhouses on another, duplexes on another, etcetera. Most FBCs tend to classify groups into broad groups, rather than use granular, specific laundry lists. Nonew of this millinery/taxi dancing/coopersmith/farrier stuff.
  • Conventional zoning - less certainty with form, emphasizes separation of use.
  • Form-based codes - more certainty with form, emphasizes compatibility and synergy of uses rather than separation.
 
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