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Advisory rules for non-residential bldg color?

Messages
5
Points
0
I've been assigned the unenviable task of preparing advisory guidelines for non-residential building colors. Any suggestions besides stating we "encourage muted earth tones & discourage black, highly reflective, or fluorescent colors"?
 

SGB

Cyburbian
Messages
3,388
Points
26
[personal preference]
Give anything resembling pastel colors the big no.
[/personal preference]
 
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NHPlanner

A shadow of my former self
Staff member
Moderator
Messages
9,952
Points
40
Try to keep with the traditional local character is my recommendation. Our regs have the following on the subject:

f. MATERIALS AND COLORS
1. Guidelines:
i. Exteriors of new buildings should utilize materials appropriate for the character of the building. Brick, clapboard, shingles, stone, or architectural concrete block are preferred, and encouraged for wall surfaces.
ii. Subtle colors should be used on larger and very plain buildings, while smaller buildings with elaborate detailing can use more colors. Colors should reflect traditional New England colors with accenting trim work.
iii. Colors that are disharmonious with other colors used on the building or found on adjacent structures should be avoided.
iv. Paint colors should relate to the natural material colors found on the building such as brick, terra-cotta, stone or ceramic tile and existing elements such as signs or awnings.
v. Contrasting colors, which accent architectural details and entrances, are encouraged.
2. Standards:
i. All exterior surfaces visible to the public shall be covered with a siding material and long term maintenance characteristics of all materials should be considered during the selection process.
ii. Neon tubing shall not be used as a feature, trim, or accent area for buildings.
iii. The rear and side elevations shall incorporate the materials, design details and theme when exposed to public view.
 

nerudite

Cyburbian
Messages
6,544
Points
30
I guess I would start with what is unique about your town, setting or your building materials, and start there. As an example, many downtowns used locally manufactured brick that ended up being unique to that area... so complementing those colors are a good place to start. An example of this could be Mankato's design guidelines (pdf). Or do you have a natural features or colors in the local landscape that you want to blend in with, like the City of Sedona, AZ.

If there isn't anything that you are specifically trying to achieve, then you've pretty much hit the nail on the head. There are all kinds of generic examples out there that say pretty much the same things. I like the unique design guidelines that really promote a certain look that the town/region identifies itself with.
 

jordanb

Cyburbian
Messages
3,232
Points
25
Wouldn't highly reflective colors be a good thing in Flordia's climate? And wouldn't earth-tones be horrible?

Also what buisness does the government have enforcing something as superficial as color? Is this a historic district?
 
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