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(AIB Frat & Sor) Has anyone or someone you know been in a cult?

The Irish One

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I recently read a book about a religious cult and its "dear leader". I had found out about this cult through the public access channel (I know, get a life). The leader gives talks and is televised through out the country. I flirted with the group a little just to see what the recruitment process is like. I never went to their talks but bought some audio tapes and some books and took a couple of steps to indicate I was interested. Having recently read a book about this cult and its "dear leader" I got the sh*t scared out of me and dropped all of my investigative interests. It's incredibly frightening to see how easily people are brainwashed into believing and doing harmful things. I'd like to hear if anybody has experience with a cult. I hope you don't.

BOMB WITH LOVE
 

Repo Man

Cyburbian
Messages
2,549
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25
I believe I was the target of a "love-bombing" my freshman year in college. It was late afternoon and I was reading the newspaper and drinking coffee in the union when a cute female came and asked if she could sit by me. Being male..I said sure. She then begain talking about religion and if I was lonely and felt a void in my life. I told her that I was not lonely and that I had no interest in attending any religious activity of any kind. I explained that just because I was sitting alone didn't mean that I didn't have friends. She gave me some pamphlet for some off-campus religious gatherings and said she hoped to see me there. I then went back to the dorms and bragged to all my buddies that I was "love bombed"
 

Budgie

Cyburbian
Messages
5,270
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30
I knew a guy who was into AMWAY. I'd consider it a capitalist cult.
 

Maister

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Budgie said:
I knew a guy who was into AMWAY. I'd consider it a capitalist cult.
I think you probably could make a fairly convincing case for Amway qualifying as a cult. If you think about it, they do share a number of similar traits with the more garden variety religous cults:......exclusivity, promote beliefs through lots of testimonials, publish these testimonials in books and on tapes, hype is not just a marketing term but rather a mindset, the more serious 'inner circle' members are the ones who seem to reap all the material worldly rewards, members activiely 'prosyletize' others into their belief systems, serious adherents limit human contact to those within the group except to recruit, the leader of the cult rules through sheer force of their (usually) magnetic personality.....there's probably more.
 

Gedunker

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11,485
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All this talk about cults reminds me I have to sell my grape Kool Aid stock ;-)
 

Rumpy Tunanator

Cyburbian
Messages
4,473
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25
Repo Man said:
She then begain talking about religion and if I was lonely and felt a void in my life. I told her that I was not lonely and that I had no interest in attending any religious activity of any kind. I explained that just because I was sitting alone didn't mean that I didn't have friends.
Same thing happened to me when I was sitting at a booth in a bar a few years ago. A girl asked if she could sit in the booth and I said sure. I was thinking allright, score one for Rumpy. She kept talking and talking and some dude kept looking over and I said "whose that?" "Oh its my bf" she said, "he doesn't care that I talk to other guys about religion though". At that moment I felt like shimmying her head down the toilet and saying how daaaaaaaaarrrrrrreeeeee yooooooooooouuuuuuuuuu;)

I've known people who have been involved in something, and have just walked off the face of the earth. Then again people say that about me too B-) .
 

Budgie

Cyburbian
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5,270
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Rumpy Tunanator said:
I've known people who have been involved in something, and have just walked off the face of the earth. Then again people say that about me too B-) .
Hey, as long as you have friends with internet access who go to bed early, your always on the face of the earth.;)
 

Rumpy Tunanator

Cyburbian
Messages
4,473
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25
Budgie said:
Hey, as long as you have friends with internet access who go to bed early, your always on the face of the earth.;)
Is that you Queen B;)

I feel not alone anymore. I shall cancel my membership to the raelians at once, as soon as this weekends mass suicide slumber party is over;)
 

Maister

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71
Gedunker said:
All this talk about cults reminds me I have to sell my grape Kool Aid stock ;-)
It's an old joke but.....
Why did Idi Amin kill 800 people?
To keep up with the Jones'

Back in the day we threw a 'Jim Jones party' off campus. Had a big ol' trash can of grape Kool Aid and everyone braught their favorite variety of clear alcohol to add (I believe the bartenders out there can confirm that the name of this concoction is a 'suicide').
Anywho, after the party is winding down at 4:00 am. The host and I lined up all the people passed out in rows in the back yard and took pictures - with the host lying in the middle wearing sunglasses (ala Newsweek).
What do you mean that's in extremely poor taste? Well, it seemed like a good idea at the time.....
 

JNA

Cyburbian Plus
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25,786
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61
Maister -
Having survived such parties brings back bad nightmares :-#
when I was much younger of course!
 

nerudite

Cyburbian
Messages
6,544
Points
30
I don't think it is a cult per se, but then again... For awhile in college I was really into meditation and I went to a few weekend trips to a place up by Grass Valley in California. The group was called Ananda and at the time it appealed to my hippy ways. After a few weekends I stopped, because in some ways it started to feel a little cultish. In reality, I don't think it qualifies as a cult. But I do know a few people that have gone to live in the communities and haven't returned to the 'real world.'
 

Zoning Goddess

Cyburbian
Messages
13,852
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39
Maister said:
I think you probably could make a fairly convincing case for Amway qualifying as a cult. If you think about it, they do share a number of similar traits with the more garden variety religous cults:......exclusivity, promote beliefs through lots of testimonials, publish these testimonials in books and on tapes, hype is not just a marketing term but rather a mindset, the more serious 'inner circle' members are the ones who seem to reap all the material worldly rewards, members activiely 'prosyletize' others into their belief systems, serious adherents limit human contact to those within the group except to recruit, the leader of the cult rules through sheer force of their (usually) magnetic personality.....there's probably more.
Does this sound like (drum roll, please) Wal Mart??? With their a.m. pep rallies of the converted?

Sorry, just had to mention Wally World. :-$

Really, this reminds me of "newbies" to planning, with all their planning theories waiting to be tested, in their first job, so idealistic, until they are inculcated with the realities of a government workplace. Sorry, newbies.
 

el Guapo

Capitalist
Messages
5,995
Points
31
nerudite said:
...But I do know a few people that have gone to live in the communities and haven't returned to the 'real world.'
Its called academia and it happens in every college town across the world...:)
 

JNA

Cyburbian Plus
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25,786
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61
nerudite said:
But I do know a few people that have gone to live in the communities and haven't returned to the 'real world.'
eG said:
Its called academia and it happens in every college town across the world...
I believe it is even more concentrated in specific towns where the town's image / identity / existence is so entwined with that of the school that they couldn't exist without each other.
 

sisterceleste

Cyburbian
Messages
1,519
Points
22
everyone braught their favorite variety of clear alcohol to add (I believe the bartenders out there can confirm that the name of this concoction is a 'suicide'). ....[/QUOTE said:
stuff was pink when I was in college and we called it "pink panties"
 

michaelskis

Cyburbian
Messages
20,169
Points
51
College Marching Bands can be like that. Think about it, one guy standing infront of a gathering of people yelling orders though a magaphone to make everyone move from one spot to another while playing preselected songs in a particular manner.
 

Maister

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71
michaelskis said:
College Marching Bands can be like that. Think about it, one guy standing infront of a gathering of people yelling orders though a magaphone to make everyone move from one spot to another while playing preselected songs in a particular manner.
uuuh maybe not. Why are you still online? it's 8 minutes before 8:00 and you're going to be late!
 

Seabishop

Cyburbian
Messages
3,838
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25
The Irish One said:
Someone: What's the difference between a religion and a cult? Size!
Thats a good question, actually. I guess these are the key things: hyperactive recruitment, brainwashing, "removal" from mainstream society, a focus on a "leader" rather than just a religious belief, and of course the occassional murder or mass suicide.

I think the media throws the word "cult" around too much. There's a story around here about a small religious sect who's member had her baby die after not getting modern medical attention. The local news media used the word "cult" a lot but to me they're just a small, weird religious sect that doesn't believe in modern medicine. (I'm not saying what they did was right) They don't seem to recruit people or act like a cult.

Its no fair. I only had guys try to convert me in college - which I guess is good because if it was an attractive girl, I would probably be dancing around in some forest right now.
 

Dragon

Cyburbian
Messages
750
Points
21
Zoning Goddess said:
Really, this reminds me of "newbies" to planning, with all their planning theories waiting to be tested, in their first job, so idealistic, until they are inculcated with the realities of a government workplace. Sorry, newbies.
It was a slap in the face.
 

Duke Of Dystopia

Cyburbian
Messages
2,713
Points
24
The Irish One said:
Someone: What's the difference between a religion and a cult? Size!
Whew! Was hoping you would catch some humor in that. :-D

In all seriousness, size has nothing to do with weather it is a cult or a religion. The term "Cult" is used by mainstream "Cults" to demean the smaller upstarts and protect thier economic and power base.

@ Seabiship

All of those things you describe

"hyperactive recruitment, brainwashing, "removal" from mainstream society, a focus on a "leader" rather than just a religious belief, and of course the occassional murder or mass suicide. control,"

Can be directly attributed to all of the Judaic faiths (Christianity, Islam, Judeaism) in great measure. I don't know enough about the eastern faiths to really comment, but it wouldn't surprise me to know they fit in there also.

I have great faith in something much greater than myself. Its all to perfect to be an accident, but as soon as you listen to the preacher or the Pope when he tells you he understands the devine being better than yourself, get ready to have your wallet raped and your personal being assaulted or worse by his (followers).

NIVENS LAW #?:
No Cause is so great that it won't attract idiots.
 

Chet

Cyburbian Emeritus
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10,623
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34
Duke Of Dystopia said:
Sure, I know plenty of Catholics, Lutherans, and Baptists.
You beat me to it - I was just about to post: "Yes, I used to to be Catholic"


The Irish One said:
Someone: What's the difference between a religion and a cult? Size!
There is no end to your truths!
 

jordanb

Cyburbian
Messages
3,232
Points
25
A "religion" is a cult that's grown big enough that around 80% of the people in it only have a cursory interest in the rituals and lifestyle.

You could make a case that the fundementalist hardliners of a religion comprise a cult. Especially when they form sects with their own dogma like Mel Gibson's sect.
 

Miles Ignatius

Cyburbian
Messages
368
Points
12
A Cult or Occult?

:-c Landmark Education? Someone formerly very close to me succumbed to this madness a few years back and resulted in a transformation that was anything but positive. Simple attempts at conversation became impossible because everything had to be framed in "LandmarkSpeak."

Truly Orwellian and in the end, very sad.
 

Seabishop

Cyburbian
Messages
3,838
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25
Sure, there's some grey area because you're always relying on the religious "expertise" of someone else, and all large religions started out as small groups of religious misfits following someone. But still, whether or not you're a fan of organized religion, there's a difference between a small religion preaching non-traditional beliefs, or following "Master Steve's" orders to kill your neighbor. I can convert to a number of odd religions and not have to totally isolate myself from family and friends like in a cult. Some leaders have (objectively) good intentions, others don't.


BTW if anyone is interested I've been seeing some wicked cool visions and have quite an agenda. I've got extra room in the basement for 2 or 3 followers. No smoking or pets please.
 

DecaturHawk

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Messages
880
Points
22
Duke Of Dystopia said:
I have great faith in something much greater than myself. Its all to perfect to be an accident, but as soon as you listen to the preacher or the Pope when he tells you he understands the devine being better than yourself, get ready to have your wallet raped and your personal being assaulted or worse by his (followers).
Wow, I must have missed that. You'd think that the Pope raping someone's wallet and ordering assaults on individuals would have been on the news or something.
 

Duke Of Dystopia

Cyburbian
Messages
2,713
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24
DecaturHawk said:
Wow, I must have missed that. You'd think that the Pope raping someone's wallet and ordering assaults on individuals would have been on the news or something.
Noun 1. tithe - a levy of one tenth of something
levy - a charge imposed and collected
2. tithe - an offering of a tenth part of some personal income
offering - money contributed to a religious organization
Verb 1. tithe - exact a tithe from; "The church was tithed"
tithe - levy a tithe on (produce or a crop); "The wool was thithed"
bill, charge - demand payment; "Will I get charged for this service?"; "We were billed for 4 nights in the hotel, although we stayed only 3 nights"
2. tithe - levy a tithe on (produce or a crop); "The wool was thithed"
levy, impose - impose and collect; "levy a fine"
tithe - exact a tithe from; "The church was tithed"
3. tithe - pay one tenth of; pay tithes on, especially to the church; "He tithed his income to the Church"
tithe - pay a tenth of one's income, especially to the church; "Although she left the church officially, she still tithes"
4. tithe - pay a tenth of one's income, especially to the church; "Although she left the church officially, she still tithes"
pay - give money, usually in exchange for goods or services; "I paid four dollars for this sandwich"; "Pay the waitress, please"
tithe - pay one tenth of; pay tithes on, especially to the church; "He tithed his income to the Church"

As for assaults on peoples bodies, there are more than a few large scale examples:

The crusades
The Inquisition
The 100 years war (that would be the birth of the protestant groups)

Small Scale Actions

All missionary activities, specificly in the south americas that devestated local methods of living.

How about the practice of putting our own native american school children in missionary run boarding schools to "civilize" them. They were also prevented from learning thier own languages this way.

This list could be lengthened by tens of thousands of references.
 
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jordanb

Cyburbian
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3,232
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25
You are, of course, aware that the Catholic Church does not collect tithes, and never has, right? It was invented by protestants as a way to pay for their churches without the structure of the Catholic Church, and the dubious things like indulgences, which they considered reprehensible.

And bigotry aside, the Catholic church, and other established churches (like the Mormon church) are not cults. They are not insular, they are not autocratic, they are accountable to their members (as the Catholic Church discovered with the abuse scandal), and they serve important functions in our society.

Now if you want to be an athiest or spiritualist or whatever you want to be, well that's just swell. I don't have any problem with it. But that you don't like organized religions doesn't give you the right to make obnoxious and bigoted statements about them.
 

NHPlanner

A shadow of my former self
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Friendly mod warning....

This thread is close to crossing the line of appropriate topics.....lets not turn this into a religious debate.....take it to PM's if that's what you want to debate.
 

Duke Of Dystopia

Cyburbian
Messages
2,713
Points
24
NHPlanner said:
Friendly mod warning....

This thread is close to crossing the line of appropriate topics.....lets not turn this into a religious debate.....take it to PM's if that's what you want to debate.

I did modify my post. Sorry 8-!

jordanb said:
......
Now if you want to be an athiest or spiritualist or whatever you want to be, well that's just swell. I don't have any problem with it. But that you don't like organized religions doesn't give you the right to make obnoxious and bigoted statements about them.
Check this link out. Its just a news article and is work safe.

http://news.independent.co.uk/europe/story.jsp?story=531952

I a deeply religious, just not in an organized sense of it. Its all to perfect to be an accident. But I realize that, that is the extent to which I can explain it all.

My only point is that every definition of a "Cult" you can come up with, fits any major or minor religion that exists.

Its not any more bigoted, or obnoxious than having to listen to the whatever southern Baptist group debating weather our schools have enough christianity in them to allow thier kids to stay in them. believing that if you have enough people included so it is no longer a "Cult" is ...um... less than accurate.

Its also not any more bigoted or obnoxious than having "people of faith" arguing a religious point of view to deny other fellow citizens equal rights like getting married based upon who they sleep with.
 
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DecaturHawk

Cyburbian
Messages
880
Points
22
Duke, that article was just more anti-Christian screed. It's bias is so blatant, you can practically feel the anti-Catholic hatred coming from it. If this is the kind of "objective" reporting you need to share to prove that "organized religion" is a threat to free peoples everywhere, you have failed, IMHO.
 
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DecaturHawk said:
Duke, that article was just more anti-Christian screed. It's bias is so blatant, you can practically feel the anti-Catholic hatred coming from it.
I didn't get that from the article. How was it "anti-Christian screed"?

My husband and I disagree on many things but one thing we agree completely upon is "freedom of religion". He and I have very different belief systems and it has not caused any particular friction in our marriage. I am told that is usually a huge problem. I don't understand why. It seems to me that every last person on the planet actually follows their own, unique set of beliefs, regardless of what label they choose to give it. And I think you know what a person REALLY believes, regardless of what comes out of their mouth, based upon how they choose to live their lives. Or, as the Christian bible says (paraphrasing): People will say "I did this in your name" and Jesus replies that he will say "I knew you not". In other words, "The king's stamp does not make the gold good". You can call it "Christian" or anything else you want until the cows come home. That doesn't make it so. Something has substance or it doesn't.

I do think there is a difference between a "cult" and a religion. I think it is a matter of degree, mostly. I think the difference is that a cult is similar to a gang: people are so desperate for a sense of belonging, acceptance, and community that they go to extremes to create a false sense of one -- where others CANNOT abandon them, without serious consequences. And that can never be a true community. Never. Churches also have a lot of trouble creating a genuine sense of community but SOME churches achieve it. I do not think a cult can ever really have that. If a group does achieve that, outsiders might label it a "cult" but it really isn't one. Community is a slippery thing and hard to create. Any time you have coercion involved, you undermine the essence of what a real community is. And anytime you have to give up your own identity, like a member of The Borg, you also are not joining a real community. Cults generally do require you to give up your independent identity. Religions do not.

I don't claim to belong to any particular religion. Nor do I claim to be an atheist, etc. So I am not personally offended one way or the other. But it seems to me that people here -- including Duke -- who are getting upset are being rather irrational about the whole thing and allowing their personal feelings and beliefs to sway them away from actual logic. Anytime you use descriptors like "screed", it suggests personal bias on your part. And emotionalism. At that point, I have to agree with NHPlanner: such discussions don't belong here. They amount to personal attacks.

Just my usual "bargain bin 2 cents worth". :-D
 

The Irish One

Member
Messages
2,267
Points
25
Cults generally do require you to give up your independent identity. Religions do not.
This is really the first major difference between the two. The cult I studied was very thorough in intimidating and blackmailing members that decided to listen to their common sense rather than the leader's. It got really ugly, ugly enough for me to stop reading and corresponding with the staff. I originally thought the group was something like SRF (nerudites reference), but these guys are the real deal. The book I read, that spills the beans on his holiness, is so great and can only be bought used because the dear leader has bought the rights to the book and now it will be erased! I'm never going to put the book in a library because I think some goon will steal it and burn it. Essentially these people use endorphins to program newbies and it works pretty well.
 
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29
We all have wounds. And we all wrestle with wanting to "belong" and feeling like, if people REALLY knew us, they would never accept us. Folks sometimes are so desperate for some sense of belonging and/or they feel so fundamentally "unacceptable" that they are willing to trade off something of their own independent identity for that sense of belonging. It is really sad. And I think it has a lot to do with whether or not your parents really made you feel genuinely loved or not. Or SOMEONE in your childhood, if not your parents.

I tell my kids this: No one deserves "unconditional love". If you could deserve it, it wouldn't be unconditional. The ability to "earn" it would automatically make it conditional. But we all need it, in order to thrive. (and, in that sense, we are all equally "deserving" of it.)

A good religion will teach you that you, as a person, are loved. And it will teach you how to live with yourself and not make too much trouble for others without giving up your identity. Some folks manage to find that with, I guess, every religion. I think no one finds it with a cult. Not even the leader. If you have to coerce "love" and adoration from people, how loved can you really feel? I suspect that cult leaders are some of the most emotionally insecure people on the planet that they have to surround themselves with an army of Borg-like followers to feel kind of okay about themselves.

If they weren't so dangerous, you would have to pity them, I think.
 

Duke Of Dystopia

Cyburbian
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2,713
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DecaturHawk said:
Duke, that article was just more anti-Christian screed. It's bias is so blatant, you can practically feel the anti-Catholic hatred coming from it. If this is the kind of "objective" reporting you need to share to prove that "organized religion" is a threat to free peoples everywhere, you have failed, IMHO.
@ Michelle Zone

I am not unhappy or mad. I actually am finding great curiosity with this discussion. It is a great display of how a "Cult" bends your thinking.

@ Decatorhawk

All that article pointed out was that the Catholic church views any type of New Age belief outside of traditional church doctrine as a threat. Bias, Spin, whatever you want to call it, it doesn't change the fact that people outside of that specific.....um......school of thought can see things much differently than those that are part of the .....um... denomination.

I don't believe religion is a threat to free peoples everywhere, but it can be VERY antidemocratic. Biased? Huh, thats what you always hear from people when they believe thier religion has been slandered. It's human nature.

Now I agree it wouldn't be fair to single out Catholics, unfortunatly, they have almost as good a PR staff at getting in the news as you could imagine, and it is not always flattering what it reveals.. What I am pointing out, is that the size and exceptance of a Cult in a broader society does not mean its not a Cult. I am not pointing out the evils of religion, I am pointing out that the main stream religions are throwing rocks at glass houses. Case in point, Bob Bar and the Fort Hood Wiccans (http://www.rickross.com/reference/wicca/wicca5.html).

Since nobody has done it yet, the following is a list of cult behaviors to watch for. Warning, None of these can be rejected from the point of a "mainstream" religion. Some are worse than others but elements of each can be found in ALL of the major religions I am aware of in some form. (from http://www.csj.org/infoserv_cult101/checklis.htm) :

1 The group is focused on a living leader to whom members seem to display excessively zealous, unquestioning commitment.

2 The group is preoccupied with bringing in new members.

3 The group is preoccupied with making money.

4 Questioning, doubt, and dissent are discouraged or even punished.

5 Mind-numbing techniques (such as meditation, chanting, speaking in tongues, denunciation sessions, debilitating work routines) are used to suppress doubts about the group and its leader(s).

6 The leadership dictates sometimes in great detail how members should think, act, and feel (for example: members must get permission from leaders to date, change jobs, get married; leaders may prescribe what types of clothes to wear, where to live, how to discipline children, and so forth).

7 The group is elitist, claiming a special, exalted status for itself, its leader(s), and members (for example: the leader is considered the Messiah or an avatar; the group and/or the leader has a special mission to save humanity).

8 The group has a polarized us- versus-them mentality, which causes conflict with the wider society.

9 The group's leader is not accountable to any authorities (as are, for example, military commanders and ministers, priests, monks, and rabbis of mainstream denominations).

10 The group teaches or implies that its supposedly exalted ends justify means that members would have considered unethical before joining the group (for example: collecting money for bogus charities).

11 The leadership induces guilt feelings in members in order to control them.

12 Members' subservience to the group causes them to cut ties with family and friends, and to give up personal goals and activities that were of interest before joining the group.

13 Members are expected to devote inordinate amounts of time to the group.

14 Members are encouraged or required to live and/or socialize only with other group members
 
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Duke, I don't believe I said you were mad or unhappy. I said your personal feelings and biases were getting in the way. I understand your points. But your views come across as rather extreme. Perhaps they aren't that extreme. Perhaps the personal feelings and biases that are getting in the way is some assumption that people won't listen or something like that, which makes you state things in a more extremist and inflammatory manner than your actual views merit.

You come across very differently in private conversations. In public ones, you appear to enjoy simply jerking people's chains. :-D And that isn't generally well received. :-}

I, personally, am always leery of group dynamics, which always have the potential to take on the kind of traits you listed. Those are all aspects of human nature. We develop group loyalty because our chances of survival and general success go up if we are a member of a group. All of those things are two-edged swords. Food is essential for our survival. It is also a risk to eat anything because it may contain germs, parasites, poison, etc. Sex can both give life and give death, metaphorically and literally. It is impossible to get our most basic needs met without being vulnerable and taking some risks.

A sense of belonging is a powerful human drive, and one that is seldom very well provided for in modern society. Any time you have lonely, needy people you have people who can be taken advantage of by an organized effort to ask that they sacrifice a great deal in order to achieve "belonging". But sometimes a person is faced with giving in to such an arrangement or simply "starving". If it is the only thing being offered in their lives to feed that particular need, it can feel like a feast in an otherwise barren landscape.

As a young woman, I would have zealously destroyed myself for a sense of belonging. But it was simply never offered to me. And I eventually changed. I came to a point where, having known nothing but rejection and having had my a$$ stomped into the ground repeatedly by Life (medical problems, special needs kids, etc), I simply did not care anymore what others thought, not even "god". There was nothing to be gained by seeking acceptance. It had never gotten me anything. I came to a point where I felt that god could kill me if I wasn't "good enough" -- and if you are going to do that, then please get it over with already, sheesh. I accepted myself, as I am, warts and all. Now that I accept myself, I get a lot more acceptance from other people. I don't think I am any "better" than I used to be. If anything, I may be a crummier person because I lowered my standards -- for example, I decided to accept more B's so I could further my education in spite of my health problems.

Well, I should crawl off to bed. If you want to have a down and dirty debate about the topic, you know where to find my IM. :) You provide the brewskies. :-D
 
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My friend Maggie recalls her childhood in a commune (when it is a good memory)/cult (when its a bad memory). Her mom became pregnant as an unwed teenager, and fled to CA after her parents disowned her in Ohio. There she met another girl who convinced her to come join their group that was started by a psychologist.

Children were not raised by their own parents, and I think were renamed, which is why Maggie is also sometimes called Dhyana by certain "family members", but by a "committee" that was in charge of their physical and educational needs.

The FBI raided them, and they relocated from San Francisco to Hawaii, and then after another FBI raid, they came back to Cali. If a member was feeling unhappy, or uncertain about staying with the group, they would be put in the middle of a circle, with the rest of the members sitting around them, and they would "discuss" what was wrong with the person that made them not want to be a part of the group anymore.

Maggie's mom got out when Maggie was 8 - she'd never celebrated a birthday, or Christmas, really hadn't worn shoes much, etc. Her mom did keep in touch with Maggie's "Committee", and Maggie has 4 mothers and 3 fathers. Its amazing that she turned out as well as she did (well.... she *is* a landscape architect :) ).
 

ludes98

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Downtown said:
Children were not raised by their own parents, and I think were renamed, which is why Maggie is also sometimes called Dhyana by certain "family members", but by a "committee" that was in charge of their physical and educational needs.
A common thing for people during the Vietnam era. Damn hippies. ;-) Don't forget the "Manson Family" did the same thing..... 8-!
 

monkeyflower

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Maister said:
Back in the day we threw a 'Jim Jones party' off campus. Had a big ol' trash can of grape Kool Aid and everyone braught their favorite variety of clear alcohol to add (I believe the bartenders out there can confirm that the name of this concoction is a 'suicide').
One of Ann Arbor's student co-ops was recently renamed "James R. Jones House", after one of Ann Arbor's co-op organizers. They, of course, celebrated the renaming with a "Jim Jones party", complete with spiked kool-aid.

This was one of their less offensive party themes; the previous year, they brought significant wrath down upon the co-ops when they had a "Martin Luther King Kobra" party on MLK day. Flyers around campus showed Rev. King holding a 40...
 

Doitnow

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Well Being in India I can see many cults around and have known some who were either in one or another of them.
I know many people who are into AMWAY.( new markets for them in this part of the world you see).
One of the more famous cults is the OSHO Cult. Ever heard of it. There are many others too.
I think Cults have beenb happenoing alongside all religions from time immemorial. A smaller set of people who have their own interpretations or practices/set of rules and attract people( preying on some human weakness or the other.
All cultists also have a religion( by birth) but not the other way around( whatever it may mean B-) )
 
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