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All of the different Twin Cities

Bear Up North

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If you are on a Cyburbia page you know about the Twin Cities. Minneapolis and St. Paul have had that designation for years and years. They even named their baseball team, The Twins.

This thread is for discussion on the twin cities that are NOT located in central Minnesota.

My first question would be: Why are Dallas & Fort Worth not called "Twin Cities"? Their combined metro is much larger than the Minnesota metro. They are close to each other.....although the Minnesota twin cities are closer. In each case, one (1) of the twin cities is larger (and more dominant) than the other. Both metros have I-35 wandering through.....and in both cases I-35 splits into I-35E and I-35W, to move through the city center of each twin.

Does anybody ever consider Portland, OR and Vancouver, WA as 'twins"? How about Houghton and Hancock, MI? What about San-Francisco and Oakland? Does having a big bay in the way mean they are not twins?

Any other examples?

Bear
 

Bear Up North

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jordanb said:
DFW is called "the metroplex."
And who decides these things? Yes, I have heard DFW called that (among other things not quite so ear-friendly.)

If it is called that because of the huge area it encompasses or the number of communites that make up the area.....the Minneapolis/St. Paul area is pretty close to competing.

Bear
 

jsk1983

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The area where I'm attending school is known as "the Triple Cities". It is comprised of Binghamton, Johnson City, and Endicott. Binghamton is the only city out of the three. It has a population of around 46,000. Johnson City, despite its name is actually a village, it has a population of around 15,000. Endicott, also a village, has a population of around 12,800. All three "cities" have an industrial past. The area was once the home of the Endicott Johnson Shoe company which was once a major employer in the area. They did alot for the community but have since departed to some place where labor is cheaper. Endicott was once home to IBM, but they too have departed and left behind a great deal of pollution.

Just north of Buffalo the cities of Tonawanda and North Tonawanda are occasionally reffered to as the twin cities. There is a twin city highway and I believe there may be a twin cities hospital. Outside of these official names it doesn't seem like you hear the cities being reffered to as "twin cities" very often. More likely a local will refer to them as the Tonawandas, which can also include the suburban town of Tonawanda.
 

Michele Zone

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Bear Up North said:
My first question would be: Why are Dallas & Fort Worth not called "Twin Cities"?
[flake BS] It's probably astrological, you know? I bet Minneapolis-Saint Paul were born under the sign of The Twins -- just like me. :-D [/flake BS]

Columbus, Georgia and Phenix City, Alabama (and, no, that is not a typo -- it really is spelled that way, :cool: ). They are so closely intertwined that Phenix City runs on Georgia time, rather than Alabama time.
 

Bear Up North

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Jeff_Rosenberg said:
In Iowa/Illinois, there are the Quad Cities of Davenport & Bettendorf, Iowa, and Rock Island & Moline, Illinois.
Just for the sake of the next few sentences, the newest population figures for metropolitan areas (shown on another thread) indicate that Toledo, OH is about twice the size of the Quaf Cities.....aprox 650,000 to 375,000.

A feature writer for The (Toledo) Blade wrote in his column today that he was impressed with a new arena in the Quad Cities. He recently drove there to attend a John Mellencamp concert. His point was that the good citizens of Toledo do not have the vision to build a new arena. Toledo's Sports Arena is perfect for minor league hockey.....it looks like it got in a fight and lost some teeth. There is talk.....and there has been talk for years.....of building a new arena.

This Libertarian has no problem with that.....as long as public funding is not involved.

Bear Discussing Hockey & Quads In A Twins Thread :-c
 

ChevyChaseDC

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As a point of contrast, the two largest municipalities of the Washington-Baltimore CMSA (that would be Washington, DC, and Baltimore, MD!) will *NEVER* be considered "twins." DC and Bawlmer are more like estranged siblings - one is preppy, clean cut, an Ivy League grad, wears a suit to work, owns a Mercedes-Benz. He is critical of his brother, wants him to be more like himself. The other dropped out of high school, has a pink flamingo tatooed on his upper arm, works as a longshoreman, and drives a 1979 Olds Cutlass Supreme. He doesn't give a sh** what his stuck-up brother thinks of him and resents how big and rich and powerful he's become.
 

Bear Up North

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ChevyChaseDC said:
As a point of contrast, the two largest municipalities of the Washington-Baltimore CMSA (that would be Washington, DC, and Baltimore, MD!) will *NEVER* be considered "twins." DC and Bawlmer are more like estranged siblings - one is preppy, clean cut, an Ivy League grad, wears a suit to work, owns a Mercedes-Benz. He is critical of his brother, wants him to be more like himself. The other dropped out of high school, has a pink flamingo tatooed on his upper arm, works as a longshoreman, and drives a 1979 Olds Cutlass Supreme. He doesn't give a sh** what his stuck-up brother thinks of him and resents how big and rich and powerful he's become.
It really is just one (1) big giant (sorry Dallas) Metroplex, right?

Bear
 

Trinity Moses

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JNA said:
There is Bloomington - Normal Ill.
,,,and in the same state w. a similar relationship (college town/not college town):

Champaigne/Urbana.


@@@@@@@@@@@@@

In the Ohio Valley a good sort-of twin cities thing going is Huntington/Ashland (tho Huntington is the larger of the two, so not exactly a "twins" thing).

I guess, for Pennsylvania, there are two examples:

Allentown/Bethlehem?

Scranton/Wilkes-Barre?
 

drucee

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Steubenville, OH/Weirton, WV.

Occasionally Burlington, VT/Plattsburgh, NY are called "twin cities" due to their position opposing each other on Lake Champlain, but the only direct access between the two cities is by ferry, and they share no common suburbs. They do have the same TV/radio market, however. Burlington and Plattsburgh have a relationship somewhat like that of Washington and Baltimore; Burlington is the cool, laid-back, idyllic college town, while Plattsburgh is the declining, miserable military satellite town whose claim to fame is being the last roadside stop on the Northway before the Canadian border.

Speaking of Canada, the rash of city amalgamations in that country has claimed one set of twins: Chicoutimi-Jonquière, Québec (now known officially as Saguenay). The other well-known sets of twins, Kitchener-Waterloo, ON and Halifax-Dartmouth, NS, remain.

Near Chicago, La Salle and Peru, IL are a set of canal towns so closely intertwined that their names are often smashed together: "Lasalleperu." We also have a couple of "twin suburbs," Oak Park and River Forest, which sit on opposite sides of Harlem Avenue just east of the Des Plaines River. Oak Park and River Forest share a high school, park district, downtown (including, perhaps, the only strip mall I've seen that spans two towns), and several geodemographic traits unique among Chicago's western suburbs. OP/RF are decidedly upper-middle class (while the surrounding suburbs are poor to middle class), majority-white (the neighboring western suburbs and areas of Chicago are majority-black), and feature a unique architecture of older four-square homes, Frank Lloyd Wright creations, and large, stylish bungalows (the neighboring towns are Chicago bungalow vernacular).

Janesville-Beloit, WI (including South Beloit, IL) are definitely twin cities, although it is uncertain (at least to me) which city is the dominant partner. Duluth, MN and Superior, WI are the other well-known example in the Badger State.

At least two metropolitan areas are known as "Tri-Cities": Bristol-Kingsport-Johnson City, TN-VA, and Richland-Pasco-Kennewick, WA.

And there are a set of suburban towns on Long Island known collectively as the "Five Towns": Cedarhurst, Hewlett, Woodmere, Inwood, Lawrence*. All are very wealthy, with a significant Jewish population.

*Pronounce them as the locals do: SEEEE-da-hu[r]st, YOOOO-lett, wood-MEEEAH, IN-w'd, LOOOOOO-rents.
 

mgk920

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JNA said:
There is Bloomington - Normal Ill.
Here in the Appleton, WI area, even though they have pretty much mushed together with Appleton and the rest of the 'Fox Cities' into one urbanized metro area, the Cities of Menasha and Neenah have always been called the 'Twin Cities'. They are so closely intertwined that they merged their fire departments a few years ago and have since been discussing a potential police merger.

Back in the 1960s, the adjacent 'twin' Cities of Fort William and Port Arthur, ON were merged to become the City of Thunder Bay.

Mike

drucee said:
Near Chicago, La Salle and Peru, IL are a set of canal towns so closely intertwined that their names are often smashed together: "Lasalleperu." We also have a couple of "twin suburbs," Oak Park and River Forest, which sit on opposite sides of Harlem Avenue just east of the Des Plaines River. Oak Park and River Forest share a high school, park district, downtown (including, perhaps, the only strip mall I've seen that spans two towns), and several geodemographic traits unique among Chicago's western suburbs. OP/RF are decidedly upper-middle class (while the surrounding suburbs are poor to middle class), majority-white (the neighboring western suburbs and areas of Chicago are majority-black), and feature a unique architecture of older four-square homes, Frank Lloyd Wright creations, and large, stylish bungalows (the neighboring towns are Chicago bungalow vernacular).
Among the Chicagoland 'twins', I would include Saint Charles/Geneva, IL and Aurora/Naperville. I also kind of consider Schaumburg and Hoffman Estates to be 'twin' cities (actually 'villages') as well as Wheeling/Buffalo Grove, Bellwood/Maywood and Berwyn/Cicero.

drucee said:
Janesville-Beloit, WI (including South Beloit, IL) are definitely twin cities, although it is uncertain (at least to me) which city is the dominant partner. Duluth, MN and Superior, WI are the other well-known example in the Badger State.
Duluth/Superior has often been called the 'Twin Ports'. A few more 'state line' twins include Marinette, WI/Menominee, MI, Texarkana, AR/Texarkana, TX and Kansas City, KS/Kansas City, MO (although I don't know if any of these are ever referred to as 'twin cities').

Mike
 
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Bear Up North said:
It really is just one (1) big giant (sorry Dallas) Metroplex, right?

Bear

yep.

There is the Omaha and Council Bluffs, IA. Iowans come to Omaha to work and Omahans go to Iowa to gamble, escape town with their mistresses and do all sorts of things that are 'frowned upon' in Omaha.
 

mgk920

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the north omaha star said:
yep.

There is the Omaha and Council Bluffs, IA. Iowans come to Omaha to work and Omahans go to Iowa to gamble, escape town with their mistresses and do all sorts of things that are 'frowned upon' in Omaha.
I'm kindof surprized that there hasn't (yet) been a major gambling development in Carter Lake, IA. It just seems to me like that would be a 'natural' place for something like that.... ^o)

Mike
 

boiker

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What about St. Jospeh and Benton Harbor, MI?
or
Sterling and Rock Falls, IL

the former of each being more prosperous than the latter.
 

giff57

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Jeff_Rosenberg said:
In Iowa/Illinois, there are the Quad Cities of Davenport & Bettendorf, Iowa, and Rock Island & Moline, Illinois.
Funny thing about that is East Moline is very close in size to Bettendorf....so there are five cities over 20,000 population and serveral smaller ones.
 

Suburb Repairman

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I think part of the reason Dallas and Fort Worth did not end up with the Twin Cities title was because they really are not that much alike and historically did not get along well.

There's an awfully big gap of desert between Midland and Odessa TX for them to be considered twins. They do share an airport in between though, so they may qualify.

Houston-Galveston (though Galveston's population isn't all that huge)

In about 10 years you'll probably add Austin-San Antonio to the list as a conurbation similar to DFW.

How about an international category:
El Paso - Juarez
San Diego - Tijuana

Another emerging metroplex:
Brownsville-McAllen-Harlingen TX
 

Cirrus

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Actually I do think there's a pair of twin cities in the DC area, but it's not DC and Baltimore... It's Alexandria and Georgetown.
 

boiker

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giff57 said:
Funny thing about that is East Moline is very close in size to Bettendorf....so there are five cities over 20,000 population and serveral smaller ones.
Residents of the Quad Cities will tell you that there are 14 communities that make the up the "Quad Cities" with the Quad referencing the USGS Quadrangle that contains the metro area.
 

jsk1983

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Cirrus said:
Actually I do think there's a pair of twin cities in the DC area, but it's not DC and Baltimore... It's Alexandria and Georgetown.
Isn't Georgetown just a part of D.C.? I'd say Alexandria and Arlington are the twin cities.
 

Cirrus

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Georgetown is now, but it didn't used to be... And Alexandria DID used to be.

See, Georgetown and Alexandria were both large colonial port cities decades before Washington was ever dreamt up. When the District was formed it included both. Eventually the western side of the Potomac River was given back to VA and Georgetown annexed by Washington, but for many years there were actually three more or less independent cities in the District of Columbia: Washington, Georgetown and Alexandria.

In fact, it's entirely possible, even likely, that had the federal government never located where it did a multi-million metropolis might still sit on the same spot, centered around the twin cities of Alexandria and Georgetown. At the very least there would be a couple of Columbia or Charlestown-sized cities.

Arlington, OTOH, grew up as a pure streetcar suburb of Washington.
 

jmello

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jordanb said:
DFW is called "the metroplex."
I am sorry but that is such a lame name. It sounds like some type of wrestling move or video game nemesis.

What about Raleigh-Durham, NC? And, are Winston-Salem two separate cities or just one city with a really weird name?
 
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JNA

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In Utah there is Provo - Orem.
In Texas there is Midland - Odessa.
In Washington there is Richland - Kennewick - Pasco.
 

jordanb

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jmello said:
I am sorry but that is such a lame name. It sounds like some type of wrestling move or video game nemesis.
Sounds like a good name for a Texas town then. :-D
 

biscuit

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jmello said:
What about Raleigh-Durham, NC? And, are Winston-Salem two separate cities or just one city with a really weird name?
Winston-Salem is one city that was formed in the early 1900's from the consolidation of the Monrovian community of Salem and the tobacco town of Winston.

Greenville - Spartanbug, SC is perhaps one.
 

jresta

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jmello said:
What about Raleigh-Durham, NC? And, are Winston-Salem two separate cities or just one city with a really weird name?
People from that part of North Carolina roll their eyes at "Raleigh-Durham". Raleigh-Durham is the name of the airport in Durham County. Raleigh is 30 miles away from downtown Durham in Wake County. This area is called "the Triangle" for Raleigh, Durham, and Chapel Hill. Really Chapel Hill (and neighboring Carrboro where a lot of students live) is a small town with or without the University and IMO shouldn't be compared to Durham or Raleigh.

The same goes with Winston-Salem (which is actually one city - Winston annexed Salem a long time ago) and Greensboro. The two cities are about 25 miles apart but are referred to as the Triad because the town of High Point gets added in.

There are Greenville and Spartanburg in South Carolina that could be deserving of the name but they're also 25 miles distant.
 

gicarto

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When I visit Maine, I frequently hear of Lewiston and Auburn referred to as the twin cites. Lewiston has about 40,000 and Auburn has about 25,000. They are in the same County (Androscoggin) and they are right next to each other (accrose the Androscoggin River).
 

ChevyChaseDC

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Sort of. DC, NoVA and Suburban Maryland residents will always think of the "Washington Region," as used by the Washington Post, often inclusive of Baltimore, and always inclusive of its southern and western suburbs in Howard and Anne Arundel County, which are also claimed by Washington. If they're trying to be inclusive, they might even grudingly write "Washington-Baltimore." Baltimore Sun writers use "Baltimore-Washington", as in BWI airport. (I bet Washington suburban politicians and some business leaders would love to rename the airport so Washington appears first).

It's only a matter of time before the District of Columbia's population decline finally ends and surpasses the population of Baltimore City's, which continues to decline. Then, finally, DC can legitimately claim to be the largest, not just the most important city in the area...

Bear Up North said:
It really is just one (1) big giant (sorry Dallas) Metroplex, right?

Bear
 

BKM

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Well, how's about San Francisco-Oakland, CA? (I know San Jose is the biggest census defined place, but only the most generous definition would call San Jose a "City." :-D )

More obscure: Larkspur/Corte Madera, two small suburban towns in Marin County, California, are known s the "Twin Cities" (Fire District, market names for businesses, Chamber of Commerce, etc.) Larkspur is the posher of the two.
 

Michele Zone

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BKM said:
Well, how's about San Francisco-Oakland, CA? (I know San Jose is the biggest census defined place, but only the most generous definition would call San Jose a "City." :-D )

More obscure: Larkspur/Corte Madera, two small suburban towns in Marin County, California, are known s the "Twin Cities" (Fire District, market names for businesses, Chamber of Commerce, etc.) Larkspur is the posher of the two.
How about Fairfield-Suisun City?
 

Trinity Moses

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Michele Zone said:
How about Fairfield-Suisun City?
LOL..I used to live in Fairfield. I would think that thats a bit of an unequal relationship as Suisun was rather small when I was there (tho there was more "there" there in Suisun as it was older).

Fairfield-Vacaville seems a better pairing.....
 

BKM

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Trinity Moses said:
LOL..I used to live in Fairfield. I would think that thats a bit of an unequal relationship as Suisun was rather small when I was there (tho there was more "there" there in Suisun as it was older).

Fairfield-Vacaville seems a better pairing.....
There is a very distinct sense of separation (even though the distance is less than two miles in some places. I, of course, work for the former and live in the latter (Although, there is a sweet lot one block from work that I wish I had the money to buy and build on)

Michelle: You heard it hear first: Suisun City will be assimilated. Resistance is futile! (j/k) :)
 

Michele Zone

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Trinity Moses said:
LOL..I used to live in Fairfield. I would think that thats a bit of an unequal relationship as Suisun was rather small when I was there (tho there was more "there" there in Suisun as it was older).

Fairfield-Vacaville seems a better pairing.....
It's an inside joke: I live in Fairfield and do a little work in Vacaville. BKM lives in Vacaville and works in Fairfield. We met once over burrito and chips and beer (I had the burrito, he had the beer and I think we both had chips). :-D

BKM, you know I live a stone's throw from the unincorporated area (that I can't think of the name of right now). When does that get assimilated?
 

BKM

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Michele Zone said:
BKM, you know I live a stone's throw from the unincorporated area (that I can't think of the name of right now). When does that get assimilated?
Never. We have to "protect Travis."
 

Michele Zone

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BKM said:
Never. We have to "protect Travis."
So why are they putting in a new church, etc etc, PAST the unincorporated area, closer to Travis? (On Walters.) And why are they planning to put a rail station up against the backside of it?


Never mind.
 

Hceux

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Suburb Repairman said:
How about an international category:
Here are a few more internatioinal examples:
- Windsor, Ontario, and Detroit, Michigan
- Cornwall, Ontario, and Massena, New York
- St. Stephens, New Brunswick, and Calais, Maine.

Isn't it odd how there are some communities that are very close to each other, but they are definitely not twin cities? Port Hope and Cobourg, ON, is one that comes to my mind. Port Hope seems to have a Toronto-esque feel in its downtown, but is forever tainted for its nuclear radioactive waste history. An 8-minute drive away is Cobourg, which seems to be a melange of a farmer community that's trying but is failing to pull a Toronto-esque facade especially at its beaches.
 

DFWGUY

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DFW not twin cities

There is absolutely nothing in North Texas that proclaims Dallas-FortWorth as twin cities, as was mentioned earlier, they are way too different from each other. And to my New England rep from earler, what's wrong with metroplex, sounds like Texas envy to me. I've seen several of your posts, definitely some Texas bias showing up as a trend. By the way, how could Houston-Galveston even remotely be considered as twin cities. There are 20 suburbs in DFW that have more population than Galveston. Houston is a one city MSA, and that's okay, you don't have to invent things.
 

Cirrus

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Thinking people from New England "envy" Texas is like thinking people who drive hybrids envy those who drive SUVs.

"Envy" is not anything even remotely close to the right word.
 
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I'm surprised no one has mentioned the 2 cities named Kansas City with Kansas City, MO being the bigger of the 2 by at least 200 - 250K people. In terms of population, I think that Johnson County, KS has more people. It's definitely more affluent.
 

BKM

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Michele Zone said:
So why are they putting in a new church, etc etc, PAST the unincorporated area, closer to Travis? (On Walters.) And why are they planning to put a rail station up against the backside of it?


Never mind.

Well, you and I will have to agree to disagree about the railroad station location. But, that area is one of the few acreages east of Peabody Road that will be considered for development under our CURRENT General Plan. Unless Chiron or a technology company miraculously shows up and wants to build a plant five miles from the facility on land full of wetlands :)

The Church was approved prior to the current General Plan. I am rpimarily talking about the area NORTH of the Air Base.

Cirrus said:
Thinking people from New England "envy" Texas is like thinking people who drive hybrids envy those who drive SUVs.

"Envy" is not anything even remotely close to the right word.
You're wrong. We ALL envy Texas, don't you know. Heck, only Texas realizes that CHEERLEADING is important enough to MURDER for. That's pretty impressive :-D :-D
 
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Michele Zone

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BKM said:
The Church was approved prior to the current General Plan. I am rpimarily talking about the area NORTH of the Air Base.
I was referring to that area bounded by East Tabor, Walters Rd., Fairfield and Suisun City when I said "unincorporated area" initially. It is already developed. I see no reason why it wouldn't be assimilated. It has some name, I think it starts with T. I just can't think of it. It is a hodge podge of "country" homes and the like but I imagine they have septic systems rather than city water/sewage. I think the "house" for the hospital on base is in that area -- similar to Ronald McDonald House but different name. You know, some place families can stay when a relative is at the hospital (which serves 8 states). I don't know what all is in that area but, to me, it looks so much like the scruffy, 'rural' housing in Simcity. :-D
 

BKM

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Michele Zone said:
I was referring to that area bounded by East Tabor, Walters Rd., Fairfield and Suisun City when I said "unincorporated area" initially. It is already developed. I see no reason why it wouldn't be assimilated. It has some name, I think it starts with T. I just can't think of it. It is a hodge podge of "country" homes and the like but I imagine they have septic systems rather than city water/sewage. I think the "house" for the hospital on base is in that area -- similar to Ronald McDonald House but different name. You know, some place families can stay when a relative is at the hospital (which serves 8 states). I don't know what all is in that area but, to me, it looks so much like the scruffy, 'rural' housing in Simcity. :-D

Ah, the "Tolenas" district, one of our stepchildren (like Old Town Cordelia) :)

We don't want it because bringing it up to City standards would be $$$$$$$.
 

BWharrie

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Albury/Wodonga in the states of New South Wales and Victoria. A year ago the two state premiers tried to join the two councils across the state border (separated by the mighty Murray River). But alass, too impossible for the respective state administrators. So we continue on where we have a total 70,000 population and two city centres separated by a river and joined by one road. We are located between the two biggest cities of Australia - Sydney and Melbourne and does not have a bypass expressway yet! They are just starting to build after 40 years of planning!
www.alburycity.nsw.gov.au
www.wodonga.vic.gov.au
Yep, plenty of planning anomolies. Same people, different planning rules. What a joke!
And if you want to go fishing in Victoria on the bank of the Murray River, you have to get a fishing licence from New South Wales because the state boundary does not run in the middle of the river but along the top of the bank on the Victorian side so the bank and below belongs to New South Wales on the other side of the water!
 

steveanne

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Buffalo/Niagara Falls, NY maybe?

Detroit/Windsor, Ontario possibly?

I dunno, i think I am getting into megalopolis' now...
 
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jmello said:
I am sorry but that is such a lame name. It sounds like some type of wrestling move or video game nemesis.
Wasn't Metroplex the Autobot city on the Transformers. A whole city that changed into a robot. Hmmmm.......
 
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Kitchener-Waterloo, a rapidly growing 'twin city' in South Western Ontario. They're not exactly twin citys, though. Kitchener is the dirtier city: crime, violence, gangs, prostitution, decaying goverment housing and so on. Whereas Waterloo is the nicer one with lots and lots of clean industries, nice neighbourhoods, a small but very nice uptown, etc.

Both great citys, though.
 

illinoisplanner

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Port Charlotte-Punta Gorda, FL
Bourbonnais-Bradley, IL
Kenosha-Racine, WI
San Marcos-New Braunfels, TX
Richmond-Petersburg, VA
 
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