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All the cool music

Maister

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Is it just me or has anyone else noticed that if you ask someone to name 5 great songs/groups in 10 seconds they invariably list songs/groups that were popular when they were coming of age/young adulthood? The same people will be able to list other great songs more recent but their first impulse is to go to their youth. Let me ask this - does anyone think that on the whole music is better now than it was when they were coming of age (this is sorta directed towards folks over 30)
 

Duke Of Dystopia

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Maister said:
.......does anyone think that on the whole music is better now than it was when they were coming of age (this is sorta directed towards folks over 30)
Music is not "better" now, it is "different" than it was. Most people seem to stagnate within one genre in thier mid 20's. Country music, or 80's, or what have you. Some get snobby and get stuck on Jazz or Classical.

Of course, the generation 10 years younger don't want you in thier world either, but screw em, what do they know! :-D
 

Maister

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Duke Of Dystopia said:
Music is not "better" now, it is "different" than it was. Most people seem to stagnate within one genre in thier mid 20's. Country music, or 80's, or what have you. Some get snobby and get stuck on Jazz or Classical.

Of course, the generation 10 years younger don't want you in thier world either, but screw em, what do they know! :-D
Let me rephrase that, does anyone ENJOY today's music more than the music of their youth.
Could 'stagnation' be the best term for this phenomenon?
 

Repo Man

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I totally agree with you. Most people I talk to still love the music that they liked between the ages of 16-22, meaning high school and college. If I had to list my favorite bands, most would either be from that era or bands that I started listening to around that time. Fugazi, Devo, Bad Religion, The Pixies, The Stone Roses, Jesus and Mary Chain, and Public Enemy are a few that come to mind.

Of the bands that would be considered current the only ones that would even consider as favorites are Radiohead, Soulfly, The Shins, and The White Stripes.
 

Budgie

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Duke Of Dystopia said:
Music is not "better" now, it is "different" than it was.
I agree, but I'm a bit of a freak when it comes to music. I like everything (yes, everything) except country music (except Kris Kristopherson). Bluegrass is NOT country music.
 

Tom R

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tunes

Being that my "imprint years" were in the late 60's and early '70s, I tend to gravitate towards the music of that era. But, I do my best to keep an open mind (as difficult as that may be) to changes in music. (With the notable execption of disco. I HATE disco!) My father was a musician and I realized later that it bothered my when he openly disparaged Rock n Roll. So I made a pledge never to say that any music was bad (with the notable execption mentioned above) but that some music I like and some I don't. This goes to aesthetics and understanding. One thing I've noticed that when I now listen to some of the music of the late 60s - early 70s, it sucks while other tunes still have that basic appeal. Surrealistic Pillow by the Jefferson Airplane, for example.
 

Gedunker

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Budgie said:
Bluegrass is NOT country music.
Can I get an AMEN?

I am hopelessly stuck in the genres and with the bands I grew up with. I don't know that what I like is somehow better than what's out there now, it's just different to me and less relevant to my life now. (crap, I'm really getting old...)
 

otterpop

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My brother once told me that the music you listen to when you are in college is the music you will love all your life. I din't beleive him, but he was mostly right. With the exception of a few performers since I graduated from college, I like the same music.
 

boilerplater

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I like Repo Man's taste in music, 'cept for maybe Fugazi. Little hard for me. I've noticed in the last few years that I just don't give a **** about what is hip or cool now. I rarely buy a new CD, have never downloaded music. The newest band I have is Coldplay. Joe Strummer's last album I really like. God, I hate to think of myself as stagnating, because I remember noticing it in older people when I was in my 20's and hoping that it never happens to me. I still like to play the music loud, though. I hope I never bland out and my tastes soften. I have Social Distortion in my car's CD player now.
 

Maister

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Tom R said:
Being that my "imprint years" were in the late 60's and early '70s, I tend to gravitate towards the music of that era. But, I do my best to keep an open mind (as difficult as that may be) to changes in music. (With the notable execption of disco. I HATE disco!) My father was a musician and I realized later that it bothered my when he openly disparaged Rock n Roll. So I made a pledge never to say that any music was bad (with the notable execption mentioned above) but that some music I like and some I don't. This goes to aesthetics and understanding. One thing I've noticed that when I now listen to some of the music of the late 60s - early 70s, it sucks while other tunes still have that basic appeal. Surrealistic Pillow by the Jefferson Airplane, for example.
I think its a perfectly cool thing to keep an open mind to new music - why cut oneself off from something great? On the other hand it could be argued that there's no particular merit in admiring derivative (or even 'bad') music. Let me give an example. I happen to like (among many other sounds) Joy Division, Bauhaus and other 80's original goth groups. Does anyone still make 'goth' music nowadays? Yes, but it's not 'happening' anymore. No music critic in his right mind would argue that the form is alive (pun intended) anymore - nothing new is being created and what's put out currently is at best a mediocre imitation. So by eschewing today's goth music one is staying true to the form. Much the same thing could be said of just about any form of music....
 

boiker

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otterpop said:
My brother once told me that the music you listen to when you are in college is the music you will love all your life. I din't beleive him, but he was mostly right. With the exception of a few performers since I graduated from college, I like the same music.

The music I listend to from 1990-1996 (grunge era) is the music I'll listen to all my life. Specifically my all time favorites (not all grunge) are NIN, Nirvana, Stone Temple Pilots, Pearl Jam, Soundgarden, Smashing Pumpkins, Alice in Chains, Foo Fighters, Radiohead.

My impressionable college years 96-2000 left me with Pink Floyd, ambient/trance/jungle/drum and bass techno, Slipknot, System of a Down, Fear Factory, Aphex Twin,

Any of these bands makes me feel all warm inside :) Any 80s music makes me relieve different episodes and instances from my childhood. That's more nostalgic.

I don't feel as if I'm stagnet or I don't enjoy todays music. I just don't enjoy todays POP music. Rock music (not nu-metal) is still very good and I will discover, buy and enjoy any bands that can be creative and artistic.
 

NHPlanner

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ditto what most people have said. I'm still mostly into the punk and hard rock stuff I was listening to in High School/College, but like budgie, pretty much like anything except country, and 95% of R&B and rap.
 

nerudite

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I still like some music from my teenage years (mostly the punk and ska stuff). But I was a total new wave addict at the time and a lot of that music doesn't suit me anymore. Many of the bands that I still love (see Repo Man's list), I really didn't figure out I liked until university or even a bit after. I actually like quite a bit of new music (White Stripes, Queens of the Stone Age, Bouncing Souls, Idlewild, Placebo, etc. etc.). I guess I just like to pick and choose my favourites from each decade.
 

Tom R

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tunes

Maister said:
On the other hand it could be argued that there's no particular merit in admiring derivative (or even 'bad') music....No music critic in his right mind would argue that the form is alive (pun intended) anymore - nothing new is being created and what's put out currently is at best a mediocre imitation. So by eschewing today's goth music one is staying true to the form. Much the same thing could be said of just about any form of music....
You're right. I didn't say that I liked all forms of music or that I could even tolerate some of it. But to the people who really like that which I can't stand, it's great. They have the aesthetic appreciation of it that I lack. It's just like my father listening to Summertime Blues by Blue Cheer.
 

Maister

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Tom R said:
You're right. I didn't say that I liked all forms of music or that I could even tolerate some of it. But to the people who really like that which I can't stand, it's great. They have the aesthetic appreciation of it that I lack. It's just like my father listening to Summertime Blues by Blue Cheer.
I know what you mean by 'keeping an open mind' - I have extremely eclectic tastes in music. Some forms appeal to me more than others but nearly every genre has something in it I like. As a rule I don't like rap and it seems to me that the form is at that creative stage now where it's enjoying its peak of commercial popularity but it's heart has stopped beating and there's nothing particularly new going on - it has crystalized. If there's anything nowadays that I try to keep an open mind to its something new more so than anything that someone's trying to emulate.
 

NHPlanner

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Eclectic is a good description for me as well.....made an mp3 CD the other day containing Melissa Auf der Maur, Rammstein, Mighty Mighty Bosstones, Veruca Salt, Perfect Circle, Danzig, and Smashing Pumpkins. :p
 

Elisabeth

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I grew up listening to Simon and Garfunkel and the Beatles (among other music not from my generation) and I would definitely say that on my top five favorite song list, "Kathy's Song" from the aformentioned S & G would have to be there. However, I like waaay too many genres of music (excluding country) to limit my top songs to just five. I don't think today's music is better than what it was ten, twenty, or thirty years ago. To me, everything sounds the same now--at least pop/rap/ hip-hop. So I think if those in their 30s and up think that the tunes from the 80s, 70s and 60s are better than what we have now, I'd have to wholeheartedly agree.
 

Repo Man

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I think that part of the problem of the music industry now is that it is targeting the wrong audience. Say you were a 12 year old girl when Britney Spears released her first cd in 1999. Well you are now 16 and probably wouldn't consider even purchasing her newest cd. In fact you are probably embarassed that you even listened to her. However if you have someone who liked the Pixies in 1987 chances are that person purchased every subsequent release and probably lined up to score tickets to this year's reunion tour. That person probably also purchased albums from bands that Pixies members were in like Frank Black and the Catholics or The Breeders. If they release an album after the reunion tour these same fans from 17 years ago will probably buy it. This failure to look at longevity is killing the music industry.

The industry doesn't want to esbablish long term fans, they just want this coveted teeny-bopper demographic. They focus on singles only not albums and are creating pre-fab stars like Jessica Simpson and Justin Timberlake instead of signing bands that have worked their way up from playing in basements and bars.

With that being said there are, as Nerudite stated, a lot of great bands out there today, I just think that for the most part the industry is ignoring them.
 

Seabishop

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An issue with nostalgia is that people forget about all the crap that was released alongside their old favorites. For every Sgt. Pepper or Dark Side of the Moon there are a hundred Tony Orlando and David Cassidy albums that were hits.

Rock radio is so pathetic now there's no point listening unless you're 14 and angry at dad. I finally have broadband as of yesterday so maybe I can start listening to things the radio stations don't think will move units.
 

ludes98

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Tom R said:
Being that my "imprint years" were in the late 60's and early '70s, I tend to gravitate towards the music of that era.
I think "imprinting" is big part of it. I think we are all a little nostalgic about our youth. Can anyone remember what they were listening to when they got their first speeding ticket or said goodbye to the big V?
 

Tom R

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Some of the music I'm getting into more and more was recorded while I was in diapers or before I was born. It started with Doo Wop, then Charlie Parker and bebop to Louis Armstrong, Billie Holiday, Sarah Vaughn among others. There's a lot of very good old stuff out there.
 

Gedunker

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Seabishop said:
Rock radio is so pathetic now there's no point listening unless you're 14 and angry at dad. I finally have broadband as of yesterday so maybe I can start listening to things the radio stations don't think will move units.
Louisville is radio wasteland -- which is why the biggest "act" to come near here in years was, like, Yanni or something. I mean it's pathetic. So not only am I stuck with what I grew up with, but I have never heard of many, many, many of the bands mentioned by earlier posters:

nerudite said:
(White Stripes, Queens of the Stone Age, Bouncing Souls, Idlewild, Placebo, etc. etc.)
Who? (and I don't mean that derogatorily -- I've just never heard of any of 'em.) B-)
 

tsc

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I am actually more accepting of music that I hated from when I grew up...like "Jump" from VanHalen. (late 70's-80's for me) It is a throwback. I think every generation has great music... and I love music from all generations... ...the mix I am listening too right now includes Dave Matthews, Incubus, Dinah Shore, Janet Jackson, Indigo Girls, Bob Marley, Van Morrison, La Bouche, Sarah McLachlan, U2, Joan Osbourne, Remy Zero, Eva Cassidy, Cold Play, Rosemary Clooney... so

Every generation has it's share of crap.... and contributions to classics.
 

Tom R

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sounds

ludes98 said:
I think "imprinting" is big part of it. I think we are all a little nostalgic about our youth. Can anyone remember what they were listening to when they got their first speeding ticket or said goodbye to the big V?
Yeah, sirens and bedsprings....sounds like a new group to me.
 

Maister

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ludes98 said:
I think "imprinting" is big part of it. I think we are all a little nostalgic about our youth. Can anyone remember what they were listening to when they got their first speeding ticket or said goodbye to the big V?
In both instances probably Kashmir, by Led Zep!! Pretentious? Histrionic?Overblown? Wagnerian? You bet, but isn't that the essence of being 17?
 

Budgie

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Born and breed on Bluegrass. Into AC/DC, Van Halen, Metallica, Diamond Head, Iron Maiden, GNR, Megadeth, Nuclear Assault, Acid Reign, etc...... during my junior and high school years. Primus, Red Hot Chili Peppers, Black Sabbath, Led Zepplin, Pantera, Fishbone, etc ...... during college.

Now I'm into late 60's early 70's stuff like Santana, Kinks, Thin Lizzy, Pink Floyd, Styx, Grand Funk Railroad, Heart, Joe Cocker, Jefferson Airplane, etc..... Also recently picked up the old bluegrass again -- The Dillards, Country Gazette, Pete Rowan, Earls and Scruggs, Billy Boy Monroe, etc... And I have this strange craving for Beethovan's Ninth Symphony.
 

tsc

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ludes98 said:
I think "imprinting" is big part of it. I think we are all a little nostalgic about our youth. Can anyone remember what they were listening to when they got their first speeding ticket or said goodbye to the big V?
Bruce Springsteen "born to run"
Sade :-D
 

Rumpy Tunanator

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Repo Man said:
I think that part of the problem of the music industry now is that it is targeting the wrong audience. Say you were a 12 year old girl when Britney Spears released her first cd in 1999. Well you are now 16 and probably wouldn't consider even purchasing her newest cd. In fact you are probably embarassed that you even listened to her.
That is so like untrue Repo Man, her newest album is like so total awesome. I mean come on, did you like see the video like where she was like totally dying?;)


BOT: I guess I still listen to to the same stuff I did in HS and college although I did get into some older stuff over the past couple of years. I really haven't been to impressed by alot of the newer stuff that has been processed and crapped out lately.
 

mgk920

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Elisabeth said:
I grew up listening to Simon and Garfunkel and the Beatles (among other music not from my generation) and I would definitely say that on my top five favorite song list, "Kathy's Song" from the aformentioned S & G would have to be there. However, I like waaay too many genres of music (excluding country) to limit my top songs to just five. I don't think today's music is better than what it was ten, twenty, or thirty years ago. To me, everything sounds the same now--at least pop/rap/ hip-hop. So I think if those in their 30s and up think that the tunes from the 80s, 70s and 60s are better than what we have now, I'd have to wholeheartedly agree.
Right now, I have about 2000 song files in my IPod, mainly a steady diet of mid-1960s and later 'radio hits', but with a precipitous dropoff starting about 1992. Music quality dropped a LOT at about that time, not co-incidently with the labels' collective decision to deep-six the single and go with high-priced CDs. The refocus on the 'quick buck' and away from nurturing their fans took hold about then, too.

In all, the record labels are so screwed up right now that they are reaching for any straw that they can to explain their drop in CD sales (I look upon the rise of the 'illegal' peer-to-peer file-sharing networks as a classic black market, nothing more than a symptom of their problems, but certainly NOT the cause of them), while the 'performing rights' organizations (ie, ASCAP and BMI) both reported their best years ever in 2003.

My taste is mainly radio hits, with smatterings of older country mixed in. I also like good, rhythmic dance club stuff. NO hard rap/punk/headbanger or country less than about 20 years old, please.

Another good question, what do you like listening to on roadtrips? I'm looking for 'playlist' ideas for my IPod. :)

Mike
 

Duke Of Dystopia

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Maister said:
Let me rephrase that, does anyone ENJOY today's music more than the music of their youth.
Could 'stagnation' be the best term for this phenomenon?
I enjoy todays music more than I did in my youth or early adult stage. I appreciate it more now and respect the effects it can have on me. :-D

I am sure I will stagnate at this point, but it will be a while. I like experimental types of music and don't mind it being a bit rough (not engineered to death).

Maister said:
........Does anyone still make 'goth' music nowadays? Yes, but it's not 'happening' anymore. No music critic in his right mind would argue that the form is alive (pun intended) anymore - nothing new is being created and what's put out currently is at best a mediocre imitation. So by eschewing today's goth music one is staying true to the form. Much the same thing could be said of just about any form of music....

OH, I assure you it is alive and well. If your up for a night of such adventure, come to chicago outside of an laefest. I know the spots. Then burritos and french fries at 4:15 am in the morning, its well worth it.

The music has changed a lot since the split from punk with bauhaus and others. It continues to be very eurocentric, but there is some truly interesting stuff out there. Other names that continue to split from that same tree are Darkwave, Coldwave, Dark Ambient, Synthpop, electro. Basicly, the neat thing is that its not POP and it's base shifts so often. If your looking for interesting experimental electronic genre, the buding "Dark Folk/ Gothic Folk" is interesting. If you want, pm me, got an interesting url for you to visit and listen where they have interspersed WW II war music into dark ambient overtones. interesting mix.
 
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Miles Ignatius

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Whoa There, Pardner!

Duke Of Dystopia said:
Music is not "better" now, it is "different" than it was. Most people seem to stagnate within one genre in thier mid 20's. Country music, or 80's, or what have you. Some get snobby and get stuck on Jazz or Classical.:-D
Duke: Snobby? I started with jazz & classical and evolved to an appreciation of rock,too. There's even some country music I'll listen to. I think it's more about having "big ears" and being open to different styles and not stagnating. Or, to paraphrase Duke Ellington who made a career dispensing with "labelling" of music -There's only two types of music - good and bad.
 

Duke Of Dystopia

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Miles Ignatius said:
Duke: Snobby? I started with jazz & classical and evolved to an appreciation of rock,too. There's even some country music I'll listen to. I think it's more about having "big ears" and being open to different styles and not stagnating. Or, to paraphrase Duke Ellington who made a career dispensing with "labelling" of music -There's only two types of music - good and bad.

Not disagreeing at all. In fact, I would argue that the greatest piece of music created was Bethoven's 9th Symphoney. I love the Flying Dutchman opera. But my point about being snobby is more directed at the public broadcast stations that push Jazz & Classical down our throats at night. They never try to connect with a younger audience. The people who listen to Jazz & Classical arn't awake after midnight when they paly it. Let some young blood in and add a younger demographic of "Somthing" to the mix.

Used to be a really neat guy on Pub Radio, who would take time to show what the standard at the time Mozart was creating. Then he would play Mozart, and point out that during his time, Mozart was creating "GRUNGE" music that was over the top. :-D

Havn't heard that guy in 6 years :(

At least if I get stuck and stagnant in music, it is 15 years past my highschool days! :-D
 

Budgie

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Duke Of Dystopia said:
In fact, I would argue that the greatest piece of music created was Bethoven's 9th Symphoney.
No doubt about that. But for a shorter composition, I think "Stairway to Heaven" is the greatest song ever.
 

Miles Ignatius

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Duke Of Dystopia said:
But my point about being snobby is more directed at the public broadcast stations that push Jazz & Classical down our throats at night. They never try to connect with a younger audience. :-D
-Right! And if they don't connect with that audience, they'll wither and die. That's why, as a parent of a 15 year old son, I try to expose to him a wide range of stuff so he'll be aware that it exists. Maybe someday he'll choose to listen to it as opposed what the :"mainstream" has provided.
 

Mud Princess

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ludes98 said:
I think "imprinting" is big part of it. I think we are all a little nostalgic about our youth. Can anyone remember what they were listening to when they got their first speeding ticket or said goodbye to the big V?
Deep Purple.... :-c
 

Floridays

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Maister said:
Let me rephrase that, does anyone ENJOY today's music more than the music of their youth.
Could 'stagnation' be the best term for this phenomenon?
I admit it, still stuck in the 70's. Guess the term would be "classic rocker." Was born in mid-60's but always tagged along after the girl next door who was a TEENAGER (I thought she was so cool!) and grew up listening to her music. It's stuck ever since.
 

Repo Man

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After thinking about it for a bit I came to realize that a lot of bands that I like now are bands that were heavily influenced by bands that I liked in the late 80s and early 90s and thus sound very similar. Yikes, i guess I am stuck in my youth!

Black Rebel Motorcycle Club - Sounds like Jesus and Mary Chain
Interpol - Sounds like Joy Division
The Stills - Sound like Echo and the Bunnymen
The Rapture and Franz Ferdinand - Sound like Gang of Four and Public Image Ltd.
 

Maister

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Repo Man said:
After thinking about it for a bit I came to realize that a lot of bands that I like now are bands that were heavily influenced by bands that I liked in the late 80s and early 90s and thus sound very similar. Yikes, i guess I am stuck in my youth!

Black Rebel Motorcycle Club - Sounds like Jesus and Mary Chain
Interpol - Sounds like Joy Division
The Stills - Sound like Echo and the Bunnymen
The Rapture and Franz Ferdinand - Sound like Gang of Four and Public Image Ltd.
I don't think there's anything by definition 'wrong' with intensely liking the music of one's youth. IMHO its only when folks listen to it to the exclusion of all else that I think its bad. I seriously dug Iggy Pop and the Stooges - I'm sure anyone who's heard the Jet's 'are you going to be my girl' can't help but hear the Stooges. It's not the most original thing in the world but it still rocks.
 

Big Easy King

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IMO, music was better when I was coming of age. Current music doesn't compare to the vintage music that I still listen to...Parliament Funkadelic, Prince, New Order, Cure, Public Enemy, James Brown, etc. There's nothing like old-school music! :8: :-D
 

Jen

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I listen to a local community supported radio station that -plays folk, rock, blues, jazz and world beat. I hear some great stuff every day. A lot of it is recent some of it is old old old. I came of age in the 70's, and most of the music playing on the radio stations then you can still hear on classic rock stations today. I don't tune in to classic rock stations at all.

These days I am listening to Aretha Franklin's 2 disc set called 'Queen in Waiting
' great songs recorded in the early 60's, man can she sing. Todays song stuck in my head is I'm an evil gal, don't you mess around with me...
 
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Maister said:
Is it just me or has anyone else noticed that if you ask someone to name 5 great songs/groups in 10 seconds they invariably list songs/groups that were popular when they were coming of age/young adulthood? The same people will be able to list other great songs more recent but their first impulse is to go to their youth. Let me ask this - does anyone think that on the whole music is better now than it was when they were coming of age (this is sorta directed towards folks over 30)
Ahhh the greats of my youth ... Sonny Bono, Zager and Evans, Tiny Tim ...

Seriously I doubt there's either been a significant decline or improvement in most forms of popular music. It's just that I can describe rock or folk music from 1957 - 1969. I don't keep current enough to even know the names of very many recent performers.
 

Elisabeth

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mgk920 said:
Another good question, what do you like listening to on roadtrips? I'm looking for 'playlist' ideas for my IPod. :)

Well, Mike, on my iPod (mini--blue) a current roadtrip playlist is:

Bleed to Love Her--Fleetwood Mac
Mona Lisas & Mad Hatters OR Tiny Dancer--Elton John
Solsbury Hill--Peter Gabriel
Thunder Road (from the MTV plugged)--Bruce
Babylon (Live)--David Gray
Someday--The Strokes
To Be Young--Ryan Adams
Summer, Highland Falls--Billy Joel
Follow You, Follow Me--Genesis
Oh La La (cover of Wish That I Knew What I Know Now)--The Faces
As--Stevie Wonder (actually, most any Stevie song from the late 60s-70s and early 80s would suffice)
The Obvious Child--Paul Simon
Angel of Harlem--U2 (some might prefer "Where the Streets Have No Name"
On Your Side--Pete Yorn
Blue Sky/Ramblin Man--Allman Bros
Free Fallin--Tom Petty
Clocks--Coldplay

...I could make this longer, but I'll stop here. Hey, what do you recommend for playing your iPod in the car? I bought one of the wireless radio transmitters and it doesn't work well at all. I was hesistant to get the tape deck thing, but I might have to. Anyway, hope the list was helpful!
 

mgk920

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Elisabeth said:
Well, Mike, on my iPod (mini--blue) a current roadtrip playlist is:

Bleed to Love Her--Fleetwood Mac
Mona Lisas & Mad Hatters OR Tiny Dancer--Elton John
Solsbury Hill--Peter Gabriel
Thunder Road (from the MTV plugged)--Bruce
Babylon (Live)--David Gray
Someday--The Strokes
To Be Young--Ryan Adams
Summer, Highland Falls--Billy Joel
Follow You, Follow Me--Genesis
Oh La La (cover of Wish That I Knew What I Know Now)--The Faces
As--Stevie Wonder (actually, most any Stevie song from the late 60s-70s and early 80s would suffice)
The Obvious Child--Paul Simon
Angel of Harlem--U2 (some might prefer "Where the Streets Have No Name"
On Your Side--Pete Yorn
Blue Sky/Ramblin Man--Allman Bros
Free Fallin--Tom Petty
Clocks--Coldplay

...I could make this longer, but I'll stop here. Hey, what do you recommend for playing your iPod in the car? I bought one of the wireless radio transmitters and it doesn't work well at all. I was hesistant to get the tape deck thing, but I might have to. Anyway, hope the list was helpful!
Thanx for the suggestions :)

Since my car came with only a basic AM-FM radio (it was a former rental), I had to bodge together a sound system for the iPod. Along with the 15GB iPod, I bought a Belkin car cord and a set of inexpensive Altec Lansing amplified speakers (the ones shaped like triangular prisms). Those, along with a 65W AC inverter adapter that I already had, a multi-outlet car cord from Radio Shack and a bunch of zip-ties (to keep the cords from becoming a rats' nest) became the sound system. I plugged and zip-tied everything together (trimming the ends of the zip-ties with a flush-cut wire cutter), put the speakers on the back seat floor, the power inverter in the little well under the dashboard (late 1990s Chevy Cavaliers are nice for that), plugged in the car cords, attached the Belkin car cord to the bottom of the iPod, turned everything on and am in roadtrip bliss. :-}

(note, those Altec Lansing speakers are a very heavy on bass, so I had to set the iPod's equalizer to 'Treble boost'.)

Newer cars have actual 'audio in' ports on their radios/sound systems, so a Belkin car cord and a short, inexpensive patch cord will do fine. A Belkin car cord and a tape deck adapter may work well in your case, it wouldn't hurt to try it. (The Belkin car cord will recharge the iPod while it is being used.)

This all replaces the cassette mix tapes that I had been using since the 1980s. For the last couple of roadtrips, I had to get the cheapest cassette tape boombox with detachable speakers that I could find, putting the main unit on the passenger side floor (or the floor behind the passenger seat), plugging it into the inverter adaptor, toss a speaker behind each seat and lug along the case of tapes. It is an understatement to say that trying to get two other people into the car, which I did for part of a day during last year's trip, was an unpleasant experience for those two people. The iPod eliminates all of that bulk and I have already replicated all of the material on those tapes into it.

BTW, I am not turned on by those mini-FM transmitters, mainly in that I would have to retune it while driving from city to city. Frequencies that are blank in one market may well be used in others.

I'll put up a couple of my playlists when I have a little more time :)

Mike
 
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