• Ongoing coronavirus / COVID-19 discussion: how is the pandemic affecting your community, workplace, and wellness? 🦠

    Working from home? So are we. Come join us! Cyburbia is a friendly big tent, where we share our experiences and thoughts about urban planning practice, planning adjacent topics, and whatever else comes to mind. No ads, no spam, no social distancing.

another reason Iraq is going to hell

Floridays

Cyburbian
Messages
769
Points
21
Check this out:

Making the rounds on the Internet is this photo (below) of "camel spiders," photographed by troops in Iraq.


FOUND IN IRAQ !

They run 10 mph, jump three feet, are a nocturnal spider, so only come out at night unless they are in shade. When they bite you, you are injected with Novocain so you go numb instantly. You don't even know you are bitten when you are sleeping, so you wake up with part of your leg or arm missing because it has been gnawing on it all night long.

If you are walking around and you bump something that is casting a shadow over it, and the sun makes contact with it, you better run. It will instantly run for your shadow, and scream the whole time it is chasing you.

PS. The one on the bottom is eating the one on the top. These are Spiders found daily in IRAQ by our troops. Imagine waking up and seeing one of these bastards in your tent!!





Personally I hate spiders and bugs of any nature (except ladybugs). What is your take on "creepie crawlies?"
 

Dragon

Cyburbian
Messages
750
Points
21
I hate spiders with a passion :-c . Those suckers would have gotten a grenade :-D .
 

SlaveToTheGrind

Cyburbian
Messages
1,444
Points
27
From said link at the University of Washington:

Myth: In the deserts of the Near East, there are "camel spiders" which anaesthetize sleeping humans and eat large chunks of their flesh.

Fact: Most North Americans probably have not heard this legend (widespread in Arab countries) but it was disseminated to some degree by Gulf War veterans and also has been repeated by the uninformed narrator of at least one TV documentary.

"Camel spider" is a common name for solpugids, large non-spider arachnids found in desert regions. Solpugids have no venom, not even an anaesthetic, and are strictly predatory on smaller creatures.
 

GeogPlanner

Cyburbian
Messages
1,433
Points
25
Uhhhll...I hate spiders/snakes/scorpions. It's a good thing I am not in the service and over there. I would go running like a big @$$ sissy.
 

Rem

Cyburbian
Messages
1,523
Points
23
Call that a spider? Now this is a spider. No myths about the toxicity of its venom either.
 
Messages
7,649
Points
29
I used to be terrified of spiders. But I overcame my fear with a well-known psychological technique known as "flooding". In other words, the size and number of spiders I had to deal with in both Kansas and the Mojave Desert cured me of my fear of anything less awful than what REM had a link to. :)

In the Mojave, we also had a venomous snake in the backyard one morning that my husband relocated and coyotes digging in the trash -- at least 3 kids were seriously injured by coyote attacks and I would not send my kids to take trash out after dark. Small pet dogs routinely disappeared if the owners stupidly left them outside overnight, never mind the privacy fence in all the backyards (a military base: the housing was very uniform). The sound of the coyotes at 3am just out back of my home was quite eerie and creepy when I stayed up late studying for environmental law. We had a scorpion die on our front stoop. We had tarantulas in the living room, sun spiders in the family room and -- the absolute worst terrorists of the High Desert -- crickets in every nook and cranny who would SHUT UP until I felt like buy a bomb or ripping out kitchen cabinets or... no end of death and destruction in my fantasies. :-D

Spiders: no big deal. But the oversized cockroaches of the deep south still make me scream. All the more reason to remain in California. ;-)
 

michaelskis

Cyburbian
Messages
20,173
Points
51
When I was at college, there was a girl who had mentioned that she was going to school up there because she hated bugs, and it would be too cold for them. We then started to tell her about the "Snow Snakes"

They are snakes that have a thick heat producing fat layer just under there skin and they slither and burrow under the snow. They are blind, so they use a radar type thing to sense vibrations from possible prey.

They have been known to be able to bite though the side of a snow boot, and you can see the ripples on the top of the snow from where they pushed the snow up as they slither. To make things better, a friend had a scar on his foot from a water skiing accident, but we told her that it was from a snow snake.

She was terrified to go out into the snow for about two weeks, until she asked a science teacher about it.
 

Tom R

Cyburbian
Messages
2,274
Points
25
bugs

In Vietnam they have these cockroaches that are 3" to 4" long and they can fly. Not very well, like a preying mantis. Occasionally you would feel them run across your back when you're in bed. Got used to it after a while. They have centipedes that are 6" long. really nasty looking things, and rats so baig they used to stand in the chow line and nobody bucked the line either. Did I mention the mosquitoes? They could stand flat footed and rape a turkey. No....really.
 

el Guapo

Capitalist
Messages
5,995
Points
31
In the deserts of the KSA, Iraq and Kuwait I saw spiders, scorpions, dung beetles and gerbils (thousands of gerbils). But the thing that got me were the evil biting black and green flys. If you were not careful with your garbage after 3 days you could count on a billion flys at the end of a week. The greens were called either GSEF's which stands for Green S*** Eating Flys or AAA bait.

Vehicles traveled at one of two speeds: sub fly speed or hyper fly speed. If you were going SFS then the flys could keep up with your convoy. I believe that hundreds of thousands of years of evolution breed the "keep up with the guys on camels" response into these flys as a survival mechanism. Because if a fly got dropped there was no other place to go for food and breeding. Remember this place was like the surface of the moon. The Bedouins brought everything into the desert with them. My guess is that some flys may be genetically different from having followed one Bedouin tribe for thousands of years.

If you could travel at more than 20 mph you could drop the flys. But you kept the eggs and three days later you had flies again.

One other note of fly related trivia. The Army issued some bug killer to the troops that they bought on the local market. That stuff would kill a fly instantly upon contact. It was called SNIP. Be thankul for the US Consumer Product Safety Commission and the US Food and Drug Administration because they keep stuff like that out of the US. For entertainment we would pour out some SNIP on our MRE remains after lunch and watch flys die. SNIP is likely a contibuting factor to Gulf War Disease.

Dung beetles are some damn entertaining little devils. That is if you are in the middle of a desert with only a shortwave for 186 days.
 

Tom R

Cyburbian
Messages
2,274
Points
25
slither

My son has a pair of corn snakes. From their behavior last weekend, we might be having a retilian blessed event coming up. I'll keep you posted.
 

Doitnow

Cyburbian
Messages
496
Points
16
Floridays said:
oops...forgot the attachment!
crrepy

Theres this story about a school kid asked to draw a 'cow, eating grass'.
The kid leaves a blank sheet and answers when asked," theres no grass as the cow ate it. And the cow left after eating the grass." Thats why the sheet was empty.

When I read your first post I thought the spider jumped three feet out of your post. Then I saw your Avatar and thought that 'hey there's the spider". Later on I recognised the tiger and read your next post

Hey! I'm just kidding.

By the way, we have spiders in our house which are about 6 cm long. But no poisonous. I kill them whenever I see them.

Last month my parents found a 12 inch snake on the kitchen platform and kileed it instantly.

IN the last seven years or so we have had two near encounters with the deadly Cobra. Once when in the open plot next to us the labour digging and clearing rubble maimed a hissing and hooded cobra. It died eventually with a broken back from an accidental hit of a crowbar.
The second was when from nowhere a large cobra slithered into our compound and wound itself arounf the iron window grill of one of the rooms from the outside. All we did was to call the 'save the snake' society guys who came and wrapped up the poisonous snake and took it away.

all this in a totally urban areas with a few large open plots which haven't been built. 8-!

PS
The snap showing the supposedly US soldiers holding the camel spider is clearly of two spiders together in length. They look like one big creature. Uggh!
 

Rumpy Tunanator

Cyburbian
Messages
4,473
Points
25
I like spiders, they kill those pesky bugs that my cat can't catch. I hate bees the most though.

Anybody have these creepy crawlies running around their house? My cat Snarf likes to kill and eat them. They're pretty quick. I remember when I was in 4th grade I kicked a nest of these in the basement of school and they poured out everywhere :-c



 

NHPlanner

A shadow of my former self
Staff member
Moderator
Messages
9,945
Points
40
Rumpy Tunanator said:
I like spiders, they kill those pesky bugs that my cat can't catch. I hate bees the most though.

Anybody have these creepy crawlies running around their house? My cat Snarf likes to kill and eat them. They're pretty quick. I remember when I was in 4th grade I kicked a nest of these in the basement of school and they poured out everywhere :-c



YES....WTF are those things? My house is old....and I kill about 20 of them every summer.....just got my first of the year the other day.
 

Rumpy Tunanator

Cyburbian
Messages
4,473
Points
25
NHPlanner said:
YES....WTF are those things? My house is old....and I kill about 20 of them every summer.....just got my first of the year the other day.
House centipedes. It took me for ever to figure out WTF they were. I guess they're venomous, but only to the bugs they eat.
 

Planner Groupie

Cyburbian
Messages
173
Points
7
NHPlanner said:
YES....WTF are those things? My house is old....and I kill about 20 of them every summer.....just got my first of the year the other day.

Ewww...That was in your house? I am so glad I wasn't the one to find it!!
 

NHPlanner

A shadow of my former self
Staff member
Moderator
Messages
9,945
Points
40
Planner Groupie said:
Ewww...That was in your house? I am so glad I wasn't the one to find it!!
Uh huh....hopefully we won't find many (or any for that matter) when we pack up before we move. ;-)
 
Top