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Regulation Any recent state bills passed that directly affect your planning functions? ADU's and architecture, here.

SlaveToTheGrind

Cyburbian
Messages
1,583
Points
28
State lawmakers just passed a bill requiring cities to permit accessory dwelling units. I have not read the final bill but cities will not be required to have at least 25 percent of single-family dwellings the option to have an accessory apartment. This was the last I read so it could have changed. I'm sure there are standards tied to the bill and will hear the final in the local APA legislative download meeting. Also, we cannot tie architectural restrictions to certain types of residential units. I believe apartments still can have standards. If we want restrictions they need to be in the form of a development agreement. I do not like zoning by DA as they get lost over the years and people leave and institutional knowledge follows them out the door.
 

Faust_Motel

Cyburbian
Messages
836
Points
33
We have a new preemption that ADUs (already allowed by-right under existing state preemption wherever there is a SFD) cannot be limited in size below 900sf. (was 30% of the size of the primary not to exceed 600SF before) This does raise the possibility of somebody splitting a split level up/down in half into a structure that for the world looks and acts like a duplex- however ADUs have to have either the primary or accessory unit occupied by the owner and ownership cannot be split/condoized- so there are still differences.
 

DVD

Cyburbian
Messages
15,481
Points
53
Every now and then we get a WTF bill, but this year I think the state is trying to fix the blunder of saying cities can't regulate vacation rental housing. You know, tourism is good. Now that a couple houses in rich neighborhoods are getting rented out for parties the state is changing their mind and thinking the cities should have some control over the issue.
 

arcplans

As Featured in "High Times"
Messages
6,727
Points
35
You want state wide legislative mandates? Check out California. This year the state legislature is trying to change the following:
  1. Allow by right housing in commercial zones
  2. Eliminate parking minimums for any development within 1/2 mile of a transit stop
  3. Allow developments containing 2 residential units within a single-family residential zone to be considered ministerially, without discretionary review or hearing, if the proposed housing development meets certain requirements
  4. Allow municipalities to exchange regional housing allocations for affordable units (think palos verdes exchanging affordable housing with compton)
  5. Restrict agencies from using minimum lot sizes for certain single family zones
It's no wonder the masses are beginning to revolt around here.
 

mjgplanner

Member
Messages
1
Points
0
State lawmakers just passed a bill requiring cities to permit accessory dwelling units. I have not read the final bill but cities will not be required to have at least 25 percent of single-family dwellings the option to have an accessory apartment. This was the last I read so it could have changed. I'm sure there are standards tied to the bill and will hear the final in the local APA legislative download meeting. Also, we cannot tie architectural restrictions to certain types of residential units. I believe apartments still can have standards. If we want restrictions they need to be in the form of a development agreement. I do not like zoning by DA as they get lost over the years and people leave and institutional knowledge follows them out the door.
I work in a small but growing North Carolina community that wants to approve major neighborhood developments only via conditional rezoning + development agreement due to the ability to better dictate architectural standards (bad experience with last developer back-tracking on their commitment to the "agreed upon" build quality). Know any good avenues to get up-to-speed quickly with DA's?
 

dw914er

Cyburbian
Messages
1,542
Points
21
You want state wide legislative mandates? Check out California. This year the state legislature is trying to change the following:
  1. Allow by right housing in commercial zones
  2. Eliminate parking minimums for any development within 1/2 mile of a transit stop
  3. Allow developments containing 2 residential units within a single-family residential zone to be considered ministerially, without discretionary review or hearing, if the proposed housing development meets certain requirements
  4. Allow municipalities to exchange regional housing allocations for affordable units (think palos verdes exchanging affordable housing with compton)
  5. Restrict agencies from using minimum lot sizes for certain single family zones
It's no wonder the masses are beginning to revolt around here.
Don't forget SB10, that would allow 10 du/ac for cities in a transit-rich area, a jobs-rich area, or an urban infill site to be defined by the state.
 
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