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Anyone have a degree/major in Policy Studies?

ebeech121

Cyburbian
Messages
83
Points
4
Planning and Econ Development at my school (GSU) is under Urban Policy Studies.

I am just wondering what types of entry level jobs are out there for someone with absolutely no experience.

I'll also have a BA in Sociology when I'm finally out of "prison" :D
 

JNA

Cyburbian Plus
Messages
25,807
Points
61
ebeech121 said:
Anyone have a degree/major in Policy Stuies?
I am just wondering what types of entry level jobs are out there for someone with absolutely no experience.
Answer to Q. 1 - Sorry not me. One of the many Geography Grads here.

Answer to Q. 2 - Not direct but, school helped get me a part-time job/Internship in a county planning dept. :) Many others here would agree and say the same.
Dumb me did not even register for independent study credit for that experience. :-$
 
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Cardinal

Cyburbian
Messages
10,080
Points
34
I missed this one the first time.

It is a catch-22 of this field that so many of the jobs ask for both a master's degree and two years of experience. The couple exceptions are 1) entry-level jobs in large cities, which tend to be bureaucratic in nature, and 2) rural places. The first gives you support but in return tends to pidgeon-hole you to a particular function day in and out. The second asks you to be a jack-of-all trades but requires you to learn on your own. Be sure to look at unconventional ways into planning, such as non-profits, Main Street programs, etc.
 

ebeech121

Cyburbian
Messages
83
Points
4
Being a Sociology professor is sounding better and better. I won't have time to do an internship (class credit-hour-wise). And since I just got a new job at a Publix (grocery store for those who don't know), I probably won't have time to work somewhere else.

The experience part is what is going to kill me, isn't it? I would really like to stay in my area (south-eastern ATL metro area) or go further souh, maybe past Jasper county.

Hopefully my contemporary planning class that I will be taking in the Fall will help me choose.

Thanks for the help.
 

annie

Member
Messages
39
Points
2
ebeech121 said:
Planning and Econ Development at my school (GSU) is under Urban Policy Studies.

I am just wondering what types of entry level jobs are out there for someone with absolutely no experience.

I'll also have a BA in Sociology when I'm finally out of "prison" :D
When I had no experience except for an unpaid intership in my hometown's planning office, I started as an intern at a consulting firm, worked really hard, and got hired full-time after a month. I don' t think that municipal planning quite works that way. Of course, while full-time, I was still treated in an intern-esque fashion, and after 16 months, quit, and am now looking for internships again! (school in the fall doesn't leave flexibility for full time)
 

giovannitp

Cyburbian
Messages
28
Points
2
In the same boat

Not only am I graduating with the same degree as you, ebeech121, I also go to the same school! I guess I'm not the only Georgia State person on here now.

I don't feel qualified enough to give you any good suggestions but I can tell you that my goal has been to get as much job experience variety as possible. I've worked for a nonprofit community development corporation downtown, the planning department of an Atlanta suburb, and now find myself doing research for an intown home builder. I originally wanted to do a couple of internships before going to grad school at Tech for a master's in planning but I've since found myself wandering into real estate development (go figure.) I also would like to stay in Atlanta and I can tell you that there are at lot of different opportunities out there for us but its tough to get paid and get your foot in the door.

That being said, I think it's all about how you present yourself to employers, whether they be public, private, or nonprofit entities. Whenever I tell people what my degree will be in, they always ask what it actually means. Some would see this as a negative but I see it as a positive. Use your knowledge of the employer's needs and your school work to explain why you can make a definite impact at that job. In my mind urban planning, economic development, and real estate all look at the same things but from different viewpoints. This is why I have come to appreciate the generalist approach of our program.The whole experience thing is kind of a catch-22 but I'm definitely going to work for a few years before I consider grad school again.

So now I'm going to get off my soapbox and hope that I've been able to help you out some. If not, shoot me an email and we can help each other out down here.
 
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