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Architecture Appalachian Rustic Revival: is this a thing anywhere else?

Dan

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Appalachian Rustic Revival. is a term I made up for an otherwise nameless (as far as I know) kind of architectural style that's very popular locally among the crunchy crowd where I live. There's several "artisanal" bearded builder types that specialize in the style here. If I was going to describe it, the style looks something more like what you might see in a West Virginia holler than an upstate New York subdivision, yet that's where you'll find some of them. The cladding is usually unstained wood, which seems to be treated in a way to look like it's had decades of hard weathering a few years after construction. Roofs are usually metal. Construction includes conventional and timber frame. Landscaping is naturalistic, or just nonexistent -- just a house plopped down among the scrub. Driveways are gravel or dirt "pour and pray" parking patches.

⇲ Here's an example I pulled from a real estate Web site. This house was built in 2012. I'm not kidding. (In case you're wondering, $220K.)

973e60435aa12d3000eedc9f29139e64l-m1501306401xd-w1020_h770_q80.jpg


⇲ These units were built in 2006.

song.jpg


⇲ This one got its CO a few months ago. It's is a definitely-out-of-place new build in the subdivision where I live. If it weren't for the woods and wetlands in the "open space" behind my house, this would be in my backyard. It's across the street from a 4,000 square foot Georgian/Colonial revival house. I'm a lone voice in the wilderness in thinking this ... uhh, left a lot to be desired. My co-workers defend the design for being "sustainable". A vestibule and a few more windows in front, some landscaping around the foundation, moving the ductless AC/heat pump to the side, a ribbon driveway, and cleaning up the gravel and scrap (which is still on the site) would do so much to make the place look less utilitarian.

cabin.jpg


⇲ Here's another new build Appalachian Rustic Revival house., with a Cape Cod form, and no metal roof. It will look a lot different in a year or two, after the weathering kicks in.

appalachian_rustic_revival_2.jpg


⇲ A Craftsman bungalow variant. Maybe a year or two old.

timbers.jpg


⇲ A few more.

tiny timber 02.jpg


tiny timber 03.jpg


rustic rustic rustic.jpg


more rustic.jpg


⇲ Interiors are usually rustic as well. Yes, these are new houses with ≤ 7' ceiling heights on the ground floor.

low ceiling 01.jpg


low ceiling 02.jpg


low ceiling 03.jpg


So, is this a thing anywhere else?
 

Luca

Cyburbian
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1,192
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I find this quite interesting. The houses pictured above are quite a mix, aesthetically but clearly all based on some sort of poverty-shack-chic.

I had observed years ago that the post-aesthetic movement / ideology that began in the avant-garde world of 'fine' art had gradually permeated into other realms, notably attire while, for instance, household goods, interior decor, etc. were typically still strongly curated, notwithstanding changing forms.

It would now appear that the phenomenon is spreading to home exteriors / interiors.
Another interesting aspect of this is the utilitarian / egalitarian / ascetic rationales being deployed to support this (anti) style.
 
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23
Appalachian Rustic Revival. is a term I made up for an otherwise nameless (as far as I know) kind of architectural style that's very popular locally among the crunchy crowd where I live. There's several "artisanal" bearded builder types that specialize in the style here. If I was going to describe it, the style looks something more like what you might see in a West Virginia holler than an upstate New York subdivision, yet that's where you'll find some of them. The cladding is usually unstained wood, which seems to be treated in a way to look like it's had decades of hard weathering a few years after construction.

<snip>

So, is this a thing anywhere else?

Oh, yes, it is a thing!
Remember when the grunge clothing was a thing--and cost more money than classic clothing?
...The ubiquitous 'fad' of paying a fortune for a bleachy, weathered, torn-up pair of blue jeans?
Luca hit the nail on the head:
...some sort of poverty-shack-chic.
______________________________________________________________

Dan- the question is whether you want to coin the architectural style Appalachian Rustic Revival--or give the style a broader coinage. Seriously consider the latter; the following links (to a Smithsonian affiliate in Appalachian Tennessee) show how very specific the rustic Appalachian architectural style is:


The Village

The most candid photos are from yelp links:
 
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2,873
Points
23
Dan
Please Google Images for:
"Colonial Jamestown Architecture"
And also Google Images for:
"Jamestown Settlement Architecture"

In those images you will see a specific house architectural style that is "revived" in this brand new house you posted:
⇲ A Craftsman bungalow variant. Maybe a year or two old.

View attachment 48927
Uncanny resemblance, isn't it?
This is a thing, and while the word "Craftsman" is often used, the architectural style is so much older and has deeper roots.
Jamestown Settlement.jpg


Dan- If this architectural style is not already coined, you may consider coining two architectural terms:
"Colonial Jamestown Revival"
and/or
"Jamestown Settlement Revival"

In this case, the phrase "Jamestown Homestead" can not be used because:
  • Google searches will not be good - Google will "lose" many of the Settlement houses, and
  • I don't know if you ever visited some original "Jamestown Settlement" exhibitions, but it was/is a specific and unique area in Virginia.
 
Last edited:

Maister

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There's overlap, but I'm not sure Jamestown Revival is quite the same thing. The settlement was typical of standard Tudor style post and beam construction with the half timber framing and stucco walls common in England during the 16th and 17th centuries. I will, concede that a couple of the photos show dwellings without the stucco but do feature a pseudo half timber look.
 

Faust_Motel

Cyburbian
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741
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This reminds me to some degree of the board-and batten/ greenwood construction movement in northern New England in the 1970's and beyond. I think in that case, though, the stylistic similarities to "rustic revival" are just a function of budget and capability, not really an attempt at a style.
1598968307615.png
 

Planit

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It's a thing here in the mountains for vacation home rentals & 2nd mountain homes.

Chic Cabin type thing.
 
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