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GIS / spatial Arcgis online alternative

arcplans

As Featured in "High Times"
Messages
6,714
Points
34
Hello throbbing brain of cyburbia. My organization has let our ESRI maintenance plan lapse. We are a small group and only myself has capabilities to access GIS and use it regularly. When I reached out to ESRI about starting their maintenance plan back up to receive access to arcgis online so that we could put our zoning map online (which includes access to arcgis and other garbage I don't need), they asked for the 2 years back, plus this year, which in our current budgetary front is a no go (a total of $4,500).

So with that said, has anyone used mango or other platform to place their zoning maps in an easily accessible web interface that is somewhat cheaper than the $1500 BS that ESRI is pulling? To preface, I am a one man gang, I do not code, and just need something easy to access and setup, but easy for the public to use.
 
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estromberg

Cyburbian
Messages
272
Points
11
I have looked a little at using postgis and geoserver for personal use, but haven't gotten around to really implementing anything. Might look at that route, along with qgis for editing.
 

arcplans

As Featured in "High Times"
Messages
6,714
Points
34
I have looked a little at using postgis and geoserver for personal use, but haven't gotten around to really implementing anything. Might look at that route, along with qgis for editing.
Let me re-phrase. We still a single seat arcgis pro / arcmap seat, just looking for a way to port maps for public use.
 

DVD

Cyburbian
Messages
15,420
Points
53
Side thing, in Soviet Kansas there was a consortium of counties that got together to pay the capitalist ESRI fees. Can you team up with other towns to make it easier to afford?
 

Wannaplan?

Bounty Hunter
Messages
3,229
Points
30
Is the "Your places/Maps" feature in Google Maps a viable option, technically speaking? It's free, so you're more than halfway there. My work flow would be to open my shapefiles in Google Earth, save them as KML/KMZ, then upload them to the "Your places/Maps" feature in Google Maps.
 

Dan

Dear Leader
Staff member
Moderator
Messages
19,147
Points
70
Let me re-phrase. We still a single seat arcgis pro / arcmap seat, just looking for a way to port maps for public use.
I might not be getting exactly what you want right, but Google Earth can read .kmz files. This assumes you want to make the raw files available to the public, and that those downloading it have and know how to use Google Earth. Not nearly as easy as an interactive online map, I know.

Beaten by @Wannaplan?
 

arcplans

As Featured in "High Times"
Messages
6,714
Points
34
Is the "Your places/Maps" feature in Google Maps a viable option, technically speaking? It's free, so you're more than halfway there. My work flow would be to open my shapefiles in Google Earth, save them as KML/KMZ, then upload them to the "Your places/Maps" feature in Google Maps.
Can this be accessed publicly? That may be the easiest thing to do, however, can they query or just view static zoning?
I might not be getting exactly what you want right, but Google Earth can read .kmz files. This assumes you want to make the raw files available to the public, and that those downloading it have and know how to use Google Earth. Not nearly as easy as an interactive online map, I know.

Beaten by @Wannaplan?
Yea.. we can't make the raw files public (our vendor does not allow this for the first year), however, I want to people to be able to query their data, which google earth can do.
 

dw914er

Cyburbian
Messages
1,529
Points
21
Side thing, in Soviet Kansas there was a consortium of counties that got together to pay the capitalist ESRI fees. Can you team up with other towns to make it easier to afford?

The local COG may have something, or since there are a few smaller cities in your area, they may be able to take the lead on providing a regional account. We have some ESRI-based GIS opportunities through SCAG, which we will start supplementing with our in-house ArcGIS online.
 
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