Signs / billboards Architectural details as signage

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#1
We are working on a case with trying to decide of architectural details area actually signage for retail and service business. We consider the “golden aches” as signage, but what about Pizza Huts Red Roof? There are several logo and representations that seem to be integrated into building design these days. What does your ordinance say about them?

Also, can you think of more examples of this?
 

Repo Man

Cyburbian
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#2
Arches are undoubtably signage, but a red roof for Pizza Hut is not. If you want to control things like McDonalds and Pizza Hut using tacky colors on their buildings, I would strongly recommend implementing some design standards/guidelines in your ordinance. We were lucky enough to have some standards that kept McDonalds from painting a nice brick building white with a red roof. There are numerous guides, articles, and books that help communities deal with corporations who try and force their tacky image onto Cities. The truth is, if they really want to be in a community most will negotiate with the City so that both parties are satisfied.

We consider signage anything with a logo or lettering (excluding addresses).
 
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#3
What about things such as stars imprinted into the brick façade on a Toys R Us? There are the obvious ones such as fast food restaurants, but a lot of other businesses have symbols that are associated with their businesses. They may be still the same color as the remaining exterior of the building, but have been incorporated into the architectural façade of the structure. In the particular case we are dealing with right now, it is pre-stamped concrete/ stucco panels that are placed along top of the building. These symbols are not in their typical sign, but are representative of the type of products that they sell.
 
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#4
I went to a McDonald's once in the historic part of a city. The franchise got a "variance" from McDonald's to alter the standard design so it would be allowed into this historic district, with strict guidelines. The place was packed and the atmosphere was lovely and refined.

Write it into your code and the corporations can issue a variance or 'exception' or whatever if someone wants to start a franchise there.
 
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#5
Buildings as Signs

I am rewriting a sign code where the client is interested in a provision that keeps buildings from functioning as signs. I have rarely seen useful standards for this - just design guidelines that say things like: "Building elements shall not function as signage. The appearance of 'franchise architecture,' where the building functions as signage is discouraged. Incorporation of franchise or business design elements unique or symbolic of particular business shall be unobtrusive and secondary to the overall architectural design." Are there any examples of code language, or even design guidelines, that provide a more precise or useful way to identify the boundary between an architectural feature and a sign?
 

DVD

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#6
We go with the anti corporate architecture codes. Things like stars or painted dots or whatever either fall under the corporate architecture or we just ignore them depending on the situation. Generally we ignore them.
 
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