• We're a fun, friendly, and diverse group of planners, placemakers, students, and other folks who found their people here. Create your FREE Cyburbia ID, and join us today! Use your email address, or register through your Reddit, Facebook, Google, Twitter, or Microsoft account.

Are long term plans becoming obsolete?

Slideruler

Cyburbian
Messages
116
Points
6
The RTP or LTP is arguably the most theoretical of the three documents (the TIP and UPWP being the other two) because it spans so many years. Other than large 1 million+ metro areas such as Boston, New York, Bay Area, or Houston that might find it useful and visionary, I get the feeling that most folks in the smaller metro areas don't really care for it. Should it really be required anymore then? What do folks think?
 

DVD

Cyburbian
Messages
13,311
Points
34
To me the problem comes in with sustained elected official and public buy in on a plan. It's still a good thing to have to base staff decisions on and as LP said, something to deviate from.
 

glutton

Cyburbian
Messages
401
Points
11
I think LRTP's are required for all MPO's (big or small) to get federal funding...so doesn't look like they'll be going anywhere anytime soon. For municipalities, sometimes they'll just lump it in with their general comp plan and add a transportation chapter or section.
 

Coragus

Cyburbian
Messages
1,293
Points
24
Aside from being required by MPOs, LRPs are a good opportunity make the general public aware of potential road projects that are on the radar a few years out.
 
Messages
1
Points
0
LRP, MTPs (or whatever you'd like to call them) are important but they have to be written and packaged so that people can use them (and by people, I mean stakeholders, elected and the general public). I ran an MPO and the MTP I inherited was messy-even for me. The one I left was broken into smaller documents and easily read. I also believe, as planners, we have to be sensitive to our areas and be ready to shift. Nothing is written in stone. I also try like crazy to educate the public whenever I can-an educated electorate makes better decisions.
 

zurbanist

Member
Messages
8
Points
0
I would argue that they are very important. For example, the city I work for currently is trying to revitalize our "downtown" the RDA has spent millions of dollars purchasing the property and we have the area zoned very liberally to allow a diverse mix of uses. However, there is a tricky issue with our historic preservation section that makes in nigh impossible to get something off the ground. Staff determined that we need to do rewrites of the code. There was no formal downtown plan or guiding document outside of a couple paragraphs in our General Plan. This has lead elected officials to not know what they want for the area and cannot come to a consensus. The elected bodies think that there was something done to guide growth but it was a "vision" that was done with a master developer that has since gone away. The City Council doesn't seem too interested in funding a new masterplan for the area. It is making decision making very difficult, without a plan I don't see much happening to our downtown which is unfortunate.
 

Suburb Repairman

moderator in moderation
Moderator
Messages
7,311
Points
30
They remain important, but they need to build in some agility to respond to changing circumstances. Take, for example, the need to consider the curbside in light of changing ownership dynamics, rise in rideshare platforms, autonomous technology, etc. They need a solid framework to revisit emerging issues.
 

glutton

Cyburbian
Messages
401
Points
11
Also, for project grant application, it helps a lot to show that this project didn't come out of thin air and was mentioned somewhere in the LRP/LRTP/comp plan.
 
Top