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Are you a member of AIA?

michaelskis

Cyburbian
Messages
20,154
Points
51
Before work this morning I heard a commercial promoting urban planning… here is the surprise, it was sponsored by the AIA. I remembered at the APA conference in Chicago, we went to a private firm, and the guy who did the tour said that that APA is good, but the AIA is where you want to be. Are there any people in here who are in the AIA, or have been to any events, and is it worth it?


http://www2.aia.org/myaia/communities/community.asp?UserID=2&CommunityID=200
 

Wannaplan?

Bounty Hunter
Messages
3,212
Points
29
:-0

If you don't have an architecture degree, then how can one become a member of AIA?

There is a type of architect out there that believes architects can do planning. Of course, this type has a physical planning perspective and is more interested in urban design moreso than urban planning. I wouldn't be suckered by the AIA pitch - if their focus is indeed physical planning, then that's certainly a limited perspective on our built environment and I'd be a bit weary of a professional organization that gives short shrift to social issues and other non-physical aspects of planning.
 

GeogPlanner

Cyburbian
Messages
1,433
Points
25
according to the AIA website:
Allied Individual Member
I do not hold a degree in architecture but share a special interest in the built environment as a professional colleague or enthusiast.
 

Howard Roark

Cyburbian
Messages
276
Points
10
I am a black turtle necked, black plastic framed glasses wearing, card carrying member of AIA since 1998. You do not need a degree in architecture to join, anyone can be a PAAIA (professional affiliate) in order to achieve full AIA status you need to be a licensed architect, which is still possible to achieve in some states w/o a degree, but is hard as hell to meet all the requirements.

Architects do have the option to emphasize certain aspects of the profession in school and after through AIA. Where you went to school, your own personal interest, and your professional background determines how in touch w/ the social and policy issues you are.

AIA is not a regulatory body, like APA, it is a professional club that harkens its origins to the “old boy’s network” that was 19th century profession of architecture. The AIA today works as a lobby force and to maintain the boundaries of the profession, in the public and private realm, and maintain professional standards amongst its members. The AIA has done a nice job w/ the professional interest focus areas, like urban planning. The nat. convention is in Chicago in June this year, they always have several events geared towards urban design and planning, if you are interested.

http://www.aiaconvention.com/aia_splash/index.asp

The new commercials are part of the AIA’s campaign to increase visibility of the profession, and reestablish a voice in community design.

I would like to think that my background in urban design (most of my tudors in school were planners, and I do some work w/ them now) gives me insight to both professions, I do believe that the greater understanding of design and policy, the better the product.

It would be nice to see architects and planners work closer together; we definitely could build off of each other’s strengths.

Howard Roark AIA
 

Wannaplan?

Bounty Hunter
Messages
3,212
Points
29
Howard Roark said:
You do not need a degree in architecture to join, anyone can be a PAAIA (professional affiliate)
Then why be a member? What are the benefits of PAAIA?


Howard Roark said:
in order to achieve full AIA status you need to be a licensed architect, which is still possible to achieve in some states w/o a degree, but is hard as hell to meet all the requirements.
Thank you for the clarification. This is what I was responding to. A licensed architect is one thing, it's entire different bag of tricks to be a member of a professional society.
 

Howard Roark

Cyburbian
Messages
276
Points
10
Wanigas? said:
Then why be a member? What are the benefits of PAAIA?
Mod note: Quote tags fixed - PD.

It appears that there has been a name change Professional Affiliates are now known as Allied Individual Members.

From the AIA website. Basically it buys you a seat at the table, the AIA does a lot of national lobbying that would probably of mutual interest to you

Allied Individual Membership in The AIA


Allied Individual Membership
Are you a designer? An Artist? An Engineer? A Contractor? Are you working in a field that is related to architecture? Then this membership category is right for you. Here are some of the benefits of being an Allied Individual Member of the AIA.

This membership category was created to promote communication among all the members of the design and construction team. Individual allied members include engineers, planners, landscape architects, sculptors, muralist, artist, those in government, education, journalism, manufacturing, industry, and other fields allied to architecture. Allied member must not otherwise be eligible for membership in the Institute. Allied members are both members of AIA and AAF (www.archfoundation.org/)


Benefits
Allied Individual members receive the same basic benefits as architect and associate members. This means they share Institute resources, programs, services, and activities. "Share" is the key word - allied members will learn from architects as much as they will inform them about their own disciplines, professions, and concerns.

Benefit Highlights include: (www.aia.org/join/benefits.asp)



Professional Interest Areas (www.aia.org/pia/gateway/default.asp) (PIAs) are the AIA's principle sources of information, expertise, research, development, and education. The 22 PIAs include building types - healthcare, justice, education, housing, interiors - and practice issues - codes and standards, construction management, environment, historic resources, specifications and building technology, and facility management. PIA membership provides access to conferences and publications, as well as opportunities to serve as speakers and task force members. Participation in the PIAs' is included with membership.

Architectural Record archrecord.construction.com/Default.asp magazine, as well as other publications, features design, economic trends, forecasts, government affairs and technological information.

aia.org (www.aia.org/) The AIA's electronic information network for architects, enables members to communicate and share ideas with colleagues across the country and directly with the AIA through bulletin boards and e-mail. It also provides access to Institute resources, databases, and directories 24 hours a day.

AIA Library & Archives, (library.aia.org/) the leading American source for information on the practice of architecture, may be accessed on-site or via telephone, fax, www.aia.org, or mail. Specialized research services are also available.

AIA Continuing Education System (www.aia.org/conted/) (CES) features courses and products on business development and marketing.

Significant member discounts www.aia.org/books/default.asp are available on print and electronic format documents, items sold through the AIA Bookstore catalogue, meetings and conferences, CES courses, AIA conventions, and mailing lists.

AIA Advantage offers discounts on such items as long distance service, car rentals, overnight deliveries, office equipment, insurance and a gold MasterCard.

AIA Trust www.theaiatrust.org/) offers members a range of major medical, accident, life, and disability insurance plans.
 

JNA

Cyburbian Plus
Messages
25,772
Points
61
I am interested but that's another $290 @ yr
I not ready / willing to spend.
 

Howard Roark

Cyburbian
Messages
276
Points
10
Yeah, one of the problems AIA has is the expense, on top of the national fee there is a local chapter fee that varies from place to place. Fortunately a lot of architects have their dues paid by the frim they work for. Frims pay a set fee and then a smaller fee for every licensed architect on staff. The obvious attraction for firms is the access to AIA contract documents.
 

ludes98

Cyburbian
Messages
1,264
Points
22
Howard Roark said:
Yeah, one of the problems AIA has is the expense, on top of the national fee there is a local chapter fee that varies from place to place.
Hmm thats sounds familiar.

Fortunately a lot of architects have their dues paid by the frim they work for. Frims pay a set fee and then a smaller fee for every licensed architect on staff. The obvious attraction for firms is the access to AIA contract documents.
At least the APA doesn't ding the gov'ts/firms for fees too, then we might have delegates from N Korea too.
 
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