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Article - Here's a map of where Payless ShoeSource is closing 2,500 stores

Dan

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There's so many brick-and-mortar discount shoe retailers that don't have the stigma of Payless Shoes, that I doubt many will miss them.

I think there's more nostalgia for the lost middle end shoe stores that used to be a fixture in American shopping malls -- Florsheim, Kinney, and Thom McAn come to mind.
 

Maister

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Looks like we're losing a couple stores locally. I bought a pair there once. Well, two pairs now that I think of it. Because BOGO!
I tend to shop at real shoe stores. Although not exclusively, because they can be pricey.
 

DVD

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When I was a kid Payless was an upgrade. Most of my shoes came from K-Mart. Today, I think I may have bought a pair of flip flops from Payless that I still own. They exist more because of limited use than quality in the shoe.
 

WSU MUP Student

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My wife was lamenting the loss of Payless because she says it's her favorite place for cheap shoes for the kiddos, especially sandals and flip flops or dress shoes they will wear once or twice before out growing them.
 

RandomPlanner

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Looking at the map, I see there's a store closing in the town where I live and one in the town where I work. Interestingly enough, I have no idea where either of these stores are located.

Does that mean I'm a shoe snob? Maybe. (After my latest trip to the shoe repair guy, I've vowed to only buy real leather shoes from now on.)
Do I just not fall into that category of shopper (with kids; looking for cheap shoes)? Maybe.
Or is Payless closing because they've become irrelevant and people can find inexpensive shoes elsewhere?

Personally, I won't miss them. I'm not sure my community will either.
 

Doohickie

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There's one near the house we sold last year, across from the old Blockbuster Video.
 

Hawkeye66

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Its always surprised me a little that shoes have gone the cyber route since it was such a big deal to try them on first, etc. in the old days. My mom always took us to the shoe store to try them on before she bought any.
 

Maister

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Its always surprised me a little that shoes have gone the cyber route since it was such a big deal to try them on first, etc. in the old days. My mom always took us to the shoe store to try them on before she bought any.
You're the second person I've heard say this in as many days. How true. Comfortable footwear is very important and how does one know whether a pair of shoes feels just right until actually trying it on? This would be one area where I would think brick and mortar stores hold a clear advantage.
 

Hawkeye66

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You're the second person I've heard say this in as many days. How true. Comfortable footwear is very important and how does one know whether a pair of shoes feels just right until actually trying it on? This would be one area where I would think brick and mortar stores hold a clear advantage.
I think some of it is that shoes have become "more disposable". A pair of shoes was a big investment in those days. I don't have the data, but I am pretty sure that the real price of shoes has fallen considerably since 1980.
 

mike5440

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An outdoor shopping mall opened in my area a few years ago. It reminds me of what malls of the future might look like. It is modelled as a pedestrian-friendly downtown environment, but has only a couple of actual retail stores (one of which is a children's shoe store). The rest of the mall consists of restaurants and other service/experience types of businesses, as well as offices.

There is an old indoor mall across the street, which has all but closed down. There has been a controversy in my community for a while concerning what to do with it. Not surprisingly, all the options seem to involve a wrecking ball.
 
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