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Article - Minnesota's Meat Trail: 5 small-town markets worth the drive

Dan

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(I'll move this to the ED subforum if there's enough relevant responses.)

A meat trail sounds very Midwestern.

New York State has a culinary trail system. NYS embraced the locavore movement as a part of tourism and economic development.

Buffalo has a chicken wing trail!

Around here, there's a wine trail for each of the Finger Lakes (it's really a very old concept), cheese trail, and beer trail. The wine trails are very popular for bachelorette weekends, and some of the smaller and higher end wineries now prohibit limos.

It's hard to do the beverage trails without a designated driver. It's about a 10 minute drive from our house to the southernmost Cayuga Lake west shore vineyards and wineries, but we don't go as often as we'd like. Some of the wineries and vineyards have restaurants and are destinations in their own right. To hit up winery after winery (and farm brewery, cidery, and distillery) for flights would be ... dangerous. We go mainly for the occasional weekend breakfast, or when there's friends or family in town, or for a weekend.

Any studies on the economic development benefits of cuisine/beverage trails?
 
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