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Article - Study on business subsidies in Pennsylvania.

boiker

Cyburbian
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3,889
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26
http://www.pjstar.com/news/pierce/b2tqls6b002.html

Does the fall and decline of old manufacturing cities have to be so brutal? Must so many jobs be lost to new plants built on suburban greenfields?

New reports suggest that with smarter state policymaking and a dose of ingenuity, much more could be done to defend and redevelop older cities - the Youngstowns and Bethlehems, the Buffalos and Fall Rivers of America.
 
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Rumpy Tunanator

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4,473
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25
Interesting article. When I lived in Pittsburgh, even though new projects were being built in the city, the city continued to lose population. People always complained about youngings moving to arch rival Cleveland. I think Pennsylvania has the second oldest population for states behind Florida.

Well I'd like to see what happens with the control board in Pittsburgh, ours in Buffalo seems to be pushing a lot of buttons and pissing people off. Red tape, red tape, red tape.
 

pete-rock

Cyburbian
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1,550
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24
Interesting article, and I agree with a lot of the premise -- we need to invest more in existing communities.

Problem is, we are a nation that like to pick up and leaves for greener pastures, and investing in our cities is sort of counterintuitive to people who look at farmland and see new development.
 

jresta

Cyburbian
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1,474
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23
NJ and PA have the least transient populations in the union. Something like 56% of our populations live within 50 miles of their birthplace.

Pittsburgh is on the right track, i think they just started 10 years after they should have. When those other towns stop chasing smoke stacks and start focusing on small business incubation and QOL they'll turn around too.
 

BKM

Cyburbian
Messages
6,463
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29
pete-rock said:
Interesting article, and I agree with a lot of the premise -- we need to invest more in existing communities.

Problem is, we are a nation that like to pick up and leaves for greener pastures, and investing in our cities is sort of counterintuitive to people who look at farmland and see new development.
Eventually, won't we grow up?

Urban designers always talk about "sense of place" in cities. One of the reasons that we have generic places is because people in the United States are always moving around and reinventing themselves. That may be good for the individual household, of course.
 
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