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Article - Third temporary planning director hired to lead Teton County department

JNA

Cyburbian Plus
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24,576
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50

filling the planning director role has been difficult because of a nationwide shortage of planning candidates,
the complexity of the position unique to Teton County and “our interest in finding the ‘right’ candidate for this position, as opposed to settling for ‘a’ candidate.”
 

AG74683

Cyburbian
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5,762
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23
There is no reason a county that size needs that large of a planning department. I'm a one person department here and we have more people than Teton County does. Teton is an enormous county but a huge portion of that is in the Grand Teton NP and the Yellowstone NP. The density is 5 freaking people per square MILE.
 

Suburb Repairman

moderator in moderation
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The most interesting aspect of the article is recognition of the shortage of director-level candidates, which relates to the "lost generation" of planners. Planning was hard hit in the recession, and resulted in a lack of planning professionals entering the field between 2008 and 2012 (and some that had 3-5 years experience leaving the profession due to layoffs, etc.). That would be your sweet spot of experience for a director position, and has resulted in a smaller pool to fish in. I've also observed that many planners are choosing not to make that jump due to how ugly the politics have become in some jurisdictions--they simply don't think it is worth it. That particular issue I link back to an underlying "illness" in the city management profession. Personally, I've noticed a significantly increased degree of spinelessness in city managers or city managers that seem to view equal treatment under development regulations through an ethically ambiguous lens.
 

RandomPlanner

Cyburbian
Messages
1,547
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22
The most interesting aspect of the article is recognition of the shortage of director-level candidates, which relates to the "lost generation" of planners. Planning was hard hit in the recession, and resulted in a lack of planning professionals entering the field between 2008 and 2012 (and some that had 3-5 years experience leaving the profession due to layoffs, etc.). That would be your sweet spot of experience for a director position, and has resulted in a smaller pool to fish in. I've also observed that many planners are choosing not to make that jump due to how ugly the politics have become in some jurisdictions--they simply don't think it is worth it. That particular issue I link back to an underlying "illness" in the city management profession. Personally, I've noticed a significantly increased degree of spinelessness in city managers or city managers that seem to view equal treatment under development regulations through an ethically ambiguous lens.
AGREED!!

Plus, quite frankly, the economy is good right now so basically -- Planning Directors have decent jobs which gives us the flexibility to be more discerning when looking for new employment. Directors will research the community (ie Council/ Commission/ CM) and really decide if the job/ community is right for them rather than taking any job out of desperation.
 
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