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Atlanta's future rail map

AubieTurtle

Cyburbian
Messages
894
Points
21


Sorry about the huge size of the map but scrolling never hurt anyone (well, maybe).

This is a fantasy map, though most of it is based on either current plans or past studies.

Blue Line: This is the current North-South line extended to Windward Parkway. There would be five new stations on the northern end of this line.

Red Line: This is the current Northeast-South line extended into Gwinnett county. There are three new stations: International, Pleasentdale, and Presidential.

Other new stations on the red and blue lines:
Jackson Terminal - The new international terminal at the airport will have its own station.

Firefly & Whitehall - Both of these station are in old industrial areas ripe for redevelopment. The proximity to downtown, interstates and the main transit line would almost guarantee success.

Yellow Line: This line would be an extension of the current Proctor Creek and East/West lines. Six new stations would be built deep into currently underserved southern DeKalb county.

Purple Line: This line would also travel along the current East/West line. At the west end would be one new station, Fulton Industrial. The east end of the line would terminate that the Avondale station. Avondale is slated to be transformed in a TOD. This, along with a connection to the gray line would make this station relatively busy.

Black Line: Not currently on any long range plan or study, the black line would have four new mini-stations in the rapidly densifing Midtown and Downtown areas. The new underground station platforms would be small, servicing trains with only two or three cars. The purpose of the black line would be to reduce the time between trains, making use of trains more appealing to intown residents. MARTA was designed for 90 second headways. Currently the time between trains is as short at four minutes on the main line during rush hour and as long as twenty minutes on the northern sections during non-peak hours.

Green Line (light rail): This light rail line is most likely the first line to be built. It enjoys strong support from the neighborhoods along the path of the rail lines and is being championed by the president of the city council. This line would likely be built with private funds by developers along the route who see it as a way to open old industrial properties into high density mixed use.

Orange Line (light rail): When MARTA was originally conceived, a northwest line to Marietta was part of the plan. The residents of Cobb county opted to go with more roads instead of transit. Times have changed and Cobb is more open to a rail line. Besides the green line, this line has the second greatest chance of being built. The new 17th Street Bridge over the downtown connector includes a lane for the orange line.

White Line (light rail): One of the problems with the current rail system in Atlanta is that many residents of the northern suburbs have jobs that are located in another part of the gridlocked sprawl from where they live. The white line would help move riders across the northern part of the metro, connecting the various employment centers together.

Brown Line (light rail): The brown line would help connect south and west DeKalb county residents to the rest of the transit network. It would also service Turner Field.

Gray Line (light rail): These has been strong opposition to rail lines by neighborhoods along the gray line. For this reason, I've left the stations off this line since the route would have to be carefully designed to prevent opposition. Emory and the CDC have been very supportive of rail proposals and would certainly have at least one station on this line.
 

jordanb

Cyburbian
Messages
3,232
Points
25
Nice map, but I wish it were geographically accurate. This way, it's impossible to see what kind of coverage the system would actually have.
 

simulcra

Member
Messages
127
Points
6
that's an amazingly ambitious plan.

but then again, what are plans if not ambitious.

but along jordanb's line of thought, i would like to see an actual to-scale map that shows streets, scale, etc.
 

AubieTurtle

Cyburbian
Messages
894
Points
21
Hceux said:
Why am I not able to see the map?
Some users of Internet Explorer can not view PNG images. Here's a GIF version, which unfortunately isn't as clear as the PNG version:

 

AubieTurtle

Cyburbian
Messages
894
Points
21
jordanb said:
Nice map, but I wish it were geographically accurate. This way, it's impossible to see what kind of coverage the system would actually have.
Making such a map would be difficult. I might post a map later that shows the terminal stations of each of these lines so you can get an idea of coverage.

No matter what, because Atlanta is so sprawled, the system can't serve the majority of the population for day to day trips. Hopefully developments will start increasing around the current stations, and density will increase along the transit lines so more stations can be added. Right now there are long stretches between stations with little development.
 

ablarc

Cyburbian Emeritus
Messages
713
Points
20
If they put in a station where there was no development, would the development occur?
 

AubieTurtle

Cyburbian
Messages
894
Points
21
Maybe... maybe not.

Marta has been working with developers to create mixed use projects around existing stations. There is a large amount of old industrial and undeveloped land within the city. As more people move back in town, the economics of developing these properties will hopefully spur action.

Developers and transit authorities have to get together on this. A developer can't assume their transportation needs will be met after they've built (this is how Atlanta got into its current traffic nightmare... developers build huge subdivisions in areas with no way of handling the new traffic load). Just building a random transit station in an undeveloped area isn't any better since it is possible no one will ever come develop the land.

In general, I don't see the traffic and sprawl getting better so the renewal intown should pick up, which hopefully will result in better transit. It scares me to think what will happen if people move back in town and decide to still use their cars to go everywhere.
 

Hceux

Cyburbian
Messages
1,028
Points
22
Thank you AubieTurtle...

O/T - what's PNG stands for and what programs use it?

Back on topic...wow, what an ambitious plan! Let's just hope that the city never build one of the line partly done just like what Toronto did with their Sheppard Subway, which branches off from a mainline and only goes for like 4 or 5 stations, not finishing at another line...how silly?!

It's funny. I would have never thought of Atlanta having this kind of transportation. I always got a feeling that Atlanta was the Old South of Los Angeles - mobile-ville! Am I wrong on this?
 

jordanb

Cyburbian
Messages
3,232
Points
25
PNG is a newer image format than GIF that's superior in a lot of ways. For some reason, though, Microsoft has been very slow in supporting it, even though every other browser I know of handles it just fine.

I, personally, use Mozilla Firebird. It has tabs and can block popups, and it's free.
 

bocian

Cyburbian
Messages
212
Points
9
If implemented, I wonder if ridership levels would be decent on the new lines... My sister lived in Atlanta and always drove everywhere despite it having the Metro.. she moved to Boston and now rides their T everyday - is it the minset down South, or do people just do what others do?
I like Atlanta's Metro, but the stations are too far for many folks to walk to though, and vast sprawl in general encourages driving rather than taking train or bus.
 

H

Cyburbian
Messages
2,850
Points
24
Nice Fantasy Map

MARTA into Cobb County is a noble idea. The I-75 corridor to Marietta desperately needs a line, but I am willing to bet that the majority of the “voters” in Greater Cobb County don’t want a line. Heck, that is half the reason why they moved from Fulton to Cobb in the first place, not to subsidize [sarcasm] “foolish things like public transit” [/sarcasm]. I have friends in family out there, I know the general attitude.

But GO MARTA! As a native Atlantan I personally hope the entire fantasy map gets built out. :)
 

passdoubt

Cyburbian
Messages
407
Points
13
bocian said:
If implemented, I wonder if ridership levels would be decent on the new lines... My sister lived in Atlanta and always drove everywhere despite it having the Metro.. she moved to Boston and now rides their T everyday - is it the minset down South, or do people just do what others do?
I like Atlanta's Metro, but the stations are too far for many folks to walk to though, and vast sprawl in general encourages driving rather than taking train or bus.
There is an anti-public services mindset that's prevelant in a lot of the South, not to say that it doesn't exist in the Northeast... but yeah, the joke that affluent white suburbanites in Atlanta throw around is that MARTA stands for "Moving Africans Rapidly Through Atlanta." A lot of people there associate public transit with poor non-whites, crime, lower housing costs etc. Some people like the fact that people without cars can't get to their neighborhoods. They feel safer.
 

Griffin

Member
Messages
6
Points
0
Opinion from a relocated Chicagoan

Having been raised on the south side of Chicago and using the Orange Line on a daily basis for my commute into downtown and now living in the northern ‘burbs of Atlanta, I can unequivocally state that transportation will be the downfall of Atlanta. The mindset of the long-term residents is no way to mass transit and all the northerns that are relocating here bring and spread the “fear” of what comes with mass transit. Couple these mindsets with a very strong road lobbying group where concrete and asphalt lobbyists are trying to convince the state delegates that double-decker highways are the answer to Atlanta’s congestion and sprawl. Working in the public sector down here for the last 4 years and I cannot even people to hear me out on the benefits of mass transit has driven me nuts!!!!!!

My contract is up in November and I have seriously considered moving out of Georgia with a major reason being the lack of transportation options.
 

vaneau

Member
Messages
10
Points
1
Griffin said:
Having been raised on the south side of Chicago and using the Orange Line on a daily basis for my commute into downtown and now living in the northern ‘burbs of Atlanta, I can unequivocally state that transportation will be the downfall of Atlanta. The mindset of the long-term residents is no way to mass transit and all the northerns that are relocating here bring and spread the “fear” of what comes with mass transit. Couple these mindsets with a very strong road lobbying group where concrete and asphalt lobbyists are trying to convince the state delegates that double-decker highways are the answer to Atlanta’s congestion and sprawl. Working in the public sector down here for the last 4 years and I cannot even people to hear me out on the benefits of mass transit has driven me nuts!!!!!!

My contract is up in November and I have seriously considered moving out of Georgia with a major reason being the lack of transportation options.
Papi I gotta agree with you there....I am considering the same thing....throw in the towel
 

nuovorecord

Cyburbian
Messages
444
Points
13
ablarc said:
If they put in a station where there was no development, would the development occur?
That hasn't been the case in Portland. In a speculative deal, Bechtel provided most of the funding for the line to the airport, in exchange for the development rights to the adjoining, mostly vacant property. In 3 years, development out there has been slow, at best. It's zoned for light industrial purposes and the businesses haven't really been flocking to parcels adjacent to the light rail line.

Development along the other, more densely populated lines has been brisk, however. The new Yellow Line has seen a ton of redevelopment occuring along Interstate Avenue, the main ROW for the light rail line.
 

ablarc

Cyburbian Emeritus
Messages
713
Points
20
Truly a fantasy map. Here's how a place looks that can support rail transport:

NEW YORK


By contrast, ATLANTA:


Are you ever really in the city when you're in Atlanta? There are places with skyscrapers, there are places with parking lots, there are places with people hanging around. But I don't think there's any city.

It makes me mad when I go to Miami or Atlanta and see the heavy rail metros rattling around without passengers. Those precious federal funds should have gone to New York, Boston or Philadelphia, which are built for rail transport, where transit is heavily utilized, and which are in perpetual funding crisis.

Reminds me of all that homeland security for Billings, Montana.

SAN FRANCISCO Bay area is also built for rail. Corridors:
 

teshadoh

Cyburbian
Messages
435
Points
13
Oh boo hoo ablrac - what transit system isn't in financial peril these days? It's certainly not because MARTA is 'stealing' money away from 'deserving' transit systems. As for 'empty trains', I haven't been aware of them when commuting. Which does explain one complaint you have regarding density - MARTA was not initially designed to serve density oriented areas but to serve more as a commuter rail service. Atlanta does well with the limited service area:

2002 Ridership / Miles In System / Ratio
MARTA: 510,361.6 / 96.1 / 5310 people per mile
CTA: 995,621.0 / 206.3 / 4833 people per mile
SEPTA: 376,456.6 / 76.1 / 4946 people per mile

http://www.apta.com/research/stats/rail/index.cfm

But to clarify something, I'm hesitant to support increased heavy rail in the Atlanta metro area - except a northeast, north, & northwest corridor parrallel to the freeway. Otherwise light rail would be best utilized in the suburban area as well as in the city - MARTA rail is expensive to function as a full day, let alone 24 hour service due to it's lower density & higher dependance on commuting.
 
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