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Best Places to Camp

Cardinal

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We’ve discussed the best places to stay, which most people interpreted as hotels. Let’s put a twist on this and name the best places to camp. (I shouldn’t have to say it, but sleeping in an RV is not camping.) Where do you pitch a tent or simply throw down a sleeping bag?

My first choice - About fifteen kilometers into the Escalante Canyon, the Escalante River and Deer Creek come together beneath 100-meter high walls of varnished sandstone. Neither is ever much more than ten or fifteen feet across and ankle deep, but they are clear streams fed by melting snow from the nearby mountains. Here where they join they run across a ridge of sandstone with several short falls and slides, adding their melody to the song of the birds soaring there. A few waist-deep pools offer a chance for a dip, with flat boulders nearby to soak in the sun. The campsite lies just a few meters off in a grove of old cottonwoods that filter the sun and rustle in the breeze. The sand is soft and cool, perfect for walking around barefoot. No need for a tent.

A close second – About ten kilometers north from Gargantua Bay in Lake Superior Provincial Park, there is a long sandy beach running the length of a cove. The water is azure blue, looking like the Agean except for the pine and maple forest on the shores.The bay is filled with several rocky islands. This is all beautiful enough, but at the end of the beach there is another cove of an even more striking blue color, lined by a low rock cliff and complete with its own island in the center. Shallow, sandy and secluded, it is the perfect place for a swim (clothing optional). The wild blueberries and thimbleberries are thick along the edge of the forest in August. Fifty kilometers from any town, the night sky is spectacular. Your best bet is to forget the tent and simply shape a comfortable bed on the sand. Watch the stars until the waves lull you to sleep. If you are lucky, you may be nuzzled awake by a bear.
 

Zoning Goddess

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Florida is not so dramatic... but Silver River State Park, near Ocala, is brand new and very nice (with heated bathrooms, esp important for the ladies...). Roomy campsites, hiking trails, a museum on site, etc.
 

tsc

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... I am not too partial to waking to bear.... I am getting old and would rather camp on water.....just drop anchor in a cove. Love the 1,000 Islands on the NY/Canada Border... the Canadians Islands Park chain is just fabulous.

You can canoe and camp on the islands.... but my hound dog likes his big bed under the dinette.
 

SkeLeton

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... as inspired by SkeLeton?

From the best places thread:
Now, the best place I've gone camping is a small lake called Tinquilco, that's the opening gate to a very interesting national park called Huerquehue (near Pucon). One of the greatest things is that since the lake is small and a part of the national park, no motor boats are allowed. And for people that like trekking, there's a lovely trail in the national park, one of the heaviest parts of the trail is the 7km (~4-5 miles) of climbing a steep trail. Afterwards you have a few lakes that are even more quiet than Tinquilco (because the only way to get there is the trail, that is quite narrow so at most you can do it with a MTB).
:)
 

The Irish One

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About 2 miles east (I think) of Half Dome in Yosemite. Backpackers only and the bears do come through. In the morning you walk up to Half Dome for the view of a lifetime. A masterpiece. Anywhere on the John Muir trail, and plenty of places along the Pacific Coast.
 

Rem

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Kinchega National Park
On the banks of the mighty Darling River in far western NSW. The only permanent water for about 500 kilometres in any direction and home to the most extraordinary River Reg Gums. The birds are fantastic as well as the shinglebacks, goannas and water dragons. Because you are in the 'fair dinkum outback' the stars are brilliant, the nights cold and clear. The river banks are perfect camping spots.

Lord Howe Island
I don't know if sleeping on a yacht after a race is prohited under the No RV Rule (TM), but the lagoon on the western side of Lord Howe is one of the most spectacularly beautiful places I've ever been. The sail is reputedly always tough (it certainly was on my one visit) and the lagoon extremely welcome. The lagoon on the east side is full of extraordinary fish - you can walk in off the beach and swim with them. There is an honesty box hiring snorkelling gear on the beach. The walks on the island give you varying, wonderful perspectives on the island and with only a handful of cars, the place is paradise. I've got to go there again soon.
 

Greenescapist

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White Mountain National Forest in New Hampshire. I've just spend so much time there - there are a lot of beautiful spots, especially once you get the areas that you have to backpack into, like the Bonds.

Acadia National Park in Maine is breathtaking.... but you've got plenty of company to share the views. Still worth the drive to Bar Harbor, though.
 

Jeff

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PA has so many great places to camp. Potter County aka "Gods Country" is as close to the wilderness as you'll get without getting lost in Montana somewhere.

Its where our hunting cabin is, absolutely beautiful.

The kinda place where deadbeat dads go to lose their ex-wives ;)
 

Tranplanner

maudit anglais
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tsc said:
[BLove the 1,000 Islands on the NY/Canada Border... the Canadians Islands Park chain is just fabulous.[/B]
If you like the 1,000 Islands, you should cruise up to The North Shore - area of Georgian Bay between Manitoulin Island and the mainland. It is supposedly ranked in the top 3 areas to cruise in the world. The Benjamin Islands are spectacular.
 

tsc

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Tranplanner said:
If you like the 1,000 Islands, you should cruise up to The North Shore - area of Georgian Bay between Manitoulin Island and the mainland. It is supposedly ranked in the top 3 areas to cruise in the world. The Benjamin Islands are spectacular.
That is a long way to trailer... ....Lake Ontario is about as far as I go... unless I win the lottery...

Next summer... Lake Champlain... the quasi-great lake...
 

Tranplanner

maudit anglais
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You can get up there via the Trent-Severn canal - probably a two day trip from Trenton to Georgian Bay. I guess you'd probably have to have a couple of weeks available to do the whole trip.
 

Plannerbabs

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Ask me again in a few weeks when we get back, but we're heading to the Jim Thorpe Camping Resort, which looks really pretty. Plus the trees should be in glorious technicolor by then. And Cliffty Falls State Park in Madison, IN. Crowded, but lots of nice trails, caves, and ravines to go scrambling around in. And only 15 min from Madison, which is a National Historic destination.
 

Richmond Jake

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Raising River/Hat Creek area north of Lassen Nat'l Park, California. Great wild trout fishing. Beautiful views. But don't go there, you won't like it. ;)
 

SGB

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tsc said:
Lake Champlain... the quasi-great lake...
Also known affectionately as New England's West Coast.

Are you going to take the canal up, or trailer the boat?
 

PlannerByDay

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My Camping has been pretty limited to Michigan both the UP and LP. The two best places I've found so far are

Anywhere along the Lake Superior Trail in the Porcuipine Mountians Wilderness Area in the UP. A particularly nice spot is just west of the mouth of the Little Carp River, great water source, fantastic sunsets on the lake and no bugs.

The next best spot is at the Big Knob Campground in the Lake Superior State Forest, again in Michigans UP however this campground is on Lake Michigan. YOu can catch the sun rising over the Lower Peninsula/Lake in the distance.
 

martini

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Best places I've camped?

Along the Colorado Trail near Durango.

On the Grand Mesa(CO) at Beautiful Camp.

In the Gunnison Nat'l forest near the West Elk Wilderness.

The UP has many great spots. There's nothing like camping on the beach, being lulled to sleep by the waves and gently awoken by the sun creeping over the horizon.

Something that hasn't been mentioned yet, camping on the prairie. I've stay at a few spots in SW Minn. that were simply spectacular.
 

otterpop

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Glacier National Park is my favorite place to camp. Just about any campground or backcountry campsite is primo. All time favorite spot is Two Medicine Campground. It has a magnificent view of Rising Wolf Mountain, which is incredible at sunset when the sunlight hits the reddish rock slopes. A wonderful day hike from the campground along Two Medicine Lake to Upper Two Medicine Lake, then back around the other side of Two Medicine Lake and back to the campground is a perfect day. There are bears, including grizzlies, but I have yet to see one there.

I used to go once a year to a campground near the Salmon River, not too far from the ghost town of Custer. The campsites are near a very fast-flowing and loud creek. After a few days there, I found that when I left I could hear the creek in my ears for a couple hours afterwards.

Any beach or riparian area along a river while canoe-camping is also primo.
 

jmf

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otterpop said:
Glacier National Park is my favorite place to camp.
My parents just got back from a trip out west which included a drive through Glacier Mtn Nat.Park. My mom is raving about it, although she said not to tell her when we go there because the roads made her very nervous.
 

Cardinal

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otterpop said:
Glacier National Park is my favorite place to camp. Just about any campground or backcountry campsite is primo. All time favorite spot is Two Medicine Campground. It has a magnificent view of Rising Wolf Mountain, which is incredible at sunset when the sunlight hits the reddish rock slopes. A wonderful day hike from the campground along Two Medicine Lake to Upper Two Medicine Lake, then back around the other side of Two Medicine Lake and back to the campground is a perfect day. There are bears, including grizzlies, but I have yet to see one there.
Two Medicine is nice, and tends to be less crowded than the three other major jumping off points. I have hiked Upper Two Medicine Lake in the past, and this past trip I did Cobalt Lake/Two Medicine Pass. That would not be a bad camping spot.
 

nerudite

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One of my favorite places to camp in California is a county park near Sequoia/Kings Canyon National Park. It's called Balch Park and it's great because it has a little fishing lake, beautiful forests and you can even camp right amongst the sequoias (my favorite reason for camping there). It's always more quiet (and much cheaper!!!) than staying in the national park.
 

Bear Up North

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PlannerByDay said:
My Camping has been pretty limited to Michigan both the UP and LP. The two best places I've found so far are

Anywhere along the Lake Superior Trail in the Porcuipine Mountians Wilderness Area in the UP. A particularly nice spot is just west of the mouth of the Little Carp River, great water source, fantastic sunsets on the lake and no bugs.

The next best spot is at the Big Knob Campground in the Lake Superior State Forest, again in Michigans UP however this campground is on Lake Michigan. YOu can catch the sun rising over the Lower Peninsula/Lake in the distance.
I was doing a search on CANOE and ran across your reference to Big Knob. I have stayed at this campground for nearly twenty (20) years. This is the place where I burnt my butt, doing a very long and quite naked beach walk. Ouch.

Good bars close by, too. We saw bear on the trail as we drove back from the bars, a few times.

Bear Swatting Biting Sand Fly
 

Bear Up North

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otterpop said:
Glacier National Park is my favorite place to camp. Just about any campground or backcountry campsite is primo. All time favorite spot is Two Medicine Campground. It has a magnificent view of Rising Wolf Mountain, which is incredible at sunset when the sunlight hits the reddish rock slopes. A wonderful day hike from the campground along Two Medicine Lake to Upper Two Medicine Lake, then back around the other side of Two Medicine Lake and back to the campground is a perfect day. There are bears, including grizzlies, but I have yet to see one there.

I used to go once a year to a campground near the Salmon River, not too far from the ghost town of Custer. The campsites are near a very fast-flowing and loud creek. After a few days there, I found that when I left I could hear the creek in my ears for a couple hours afterwards.

Any beach or riparian area along a river while canoe-camping is also primo.
When I was at Glacier for my honeymoon it was just beautiful. We stayed at Apgar Campground, in a tiny tent. Newlyweds.

Bear In Bear Land
 

JNA

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Growing up it was anywhere our Boy Scout Troop went camping, and near Tupper Lake, NY.
In college it was Logan Canyon, UT.
Around me now it is Shawnee NF, Illinois, or Hoosier NF, IN.
 

Richmond Jake

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mendelman said:
[ot]
look at post #15 - I'm getting dejavu all over again. :p ;-)[/ot]
New England has a west coast? I'm geographically challanged, I guess.
 

PlannerByDay

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The Yoho River Campground, in the Yoho River Valley, in Yoho National Park in Birtish Columbia. The site is on an island, a 2 mile uphill hike, up the river valley past numerous waterfulls. At the campground you will have stunning views of the Yoho Galcier at the far end, and water falls on each side of the campground. One word,

BEAUTIFUL
 

Lee Nellis

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This thread is depressing. Next time around can I be please be born rich?

I am reminded of being high in the Chisos (Big Bend) for Christmas many, many years ago. And of a deluxe place to camp where Silver Run Canyon comes out on the Escalante. Way too many years since I've been there, too, or down in Ernie's Country (where is that? gee, I forget). Then there's Upper Salt Creek and the high Chiricahuas and Hunt Mountain and . . .

The most magical places are deep in the Yellowstone wilderness. The worthy will find them without more information from me.
 

Greenescapist

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PlannerByDay said:
The Yoho River Campground, in the Yoho River Valley, in Yoho National Park in Birtish Columbia. The site is on an island, a 2 mile uphill hike, up the river valley past numerous waterfulls. At the campground you will have stunning views of the Yoho Galcier at the far end, and water falls on each side of the campground. One word,

BEAUTIFUL
I don't know if it's the same site (I think not) --- but I stayed at a backcountry site called "Little Yoho" this past August in BC. It was about an 8 mile hike in from the road that cuts in front of Takkakka Falls. It was the most gorgeous place I've ever camped. We actually took a photo of the outhouse because it had an incredible view.
 

PlannerByDay

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Greenescapist said:
I don't know if it's the same site (I think not) --- but I stayed at a backcountry site called "Little Yoho" this past August in BC. It was about an 8 mile hike in from the road that cuts in front of Takkakka Falls. It was the most gorgeous place I've ever camped. We actually took a photo of the outhouse because it had an incredible view.
Was it at the confluance of 2 rivers and next to the Laughing Falls? It sounds like it might be the same spot.
 

Greenescapist

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PlannerByDay said:
Was it at the confluance of 2 rivers and next to the Laughing Falls? It sounds like it might be the same spot.
No, I did hike past Laughing Falls, but that was on the way out from the campsite. I think I camped at a higher elevation, beneath a mountain called "the President."

In Canada I also liked the backcountry sites in Jasper Nat'l Park along the Skyline Trail. We saw two Grizzlies and some Elk there at the Little Shovel site. Watchtower site was also nice but it poured there.

I also hiked through Banff, but stayed in hostels there with hordes of other people.
 

SkeLeton

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If you like deserts... The atacama Desert should be extreme enough to camp... I've heard that camping in the Valley of the moon is quite interesting as the only thing you hear at night is how the salt cracks while cooling after a warm and sunny day.
The bad thing is that you need lots of suplies, because otherwise you're really screwed, because there's nothing close and therese nothing to drink or eat. (it's a desert, duh!)
 

PlannerByDay

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Greenescapist said:
In Canada I also liked the backcountry sites in Jasper Nat'l Park along the Skyline Trail. We saw two Grizzlies and some Elk there at the Little Shovel site. Watchtower site was also nice but it poured there.

I also hiked through Banff, but stayed in hostels there with hordes of other people.
Never made it up to Jasper, that is on the agenda for next years trip up north.

I hated the City of Banff, WAY to many people. Hiked Lake Louise one day, got out early (7:00am) and hiked to the Lake Agnes Tea house for breakfast, then over the Big Bea Hive Peak into the Lake Louise Valley where we ran into Tons of people and hiked to the Lake Louise Tea House for Lunch. I much perferred the Yoho area, far fewer people, could probably count them on my two hands.

Cant wait to get back up there.
 

Greenescapist

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PlannerByDay said:
Never made it up to Jasper, that is on the agenda for next years trip up north.

I hated the City of Banff, WAY to many people. Hiked Lake Louise one day, got out early (7:00am) and hiked to the Lake Agnes Tea house for breakfast, then over the Big Bea Hive Peak into the Lake Louise Valley where we ran into Tons of people and hiked to the Lake Louise Tea House for Lunch. I much perferred the Yoho area, far fewer people, could probably count them on my two hands.

Cant wait to get back up there.
All right, now all I can think about is the mountains.

Here's a link to my pictures that are online: http://share.shutterfly.com/osi.jsp?i=EeAuW7Jo1aNGF7

I agree with you about Banff. It was just so rich and unauthentic. Field, BC was a cute little moutain town and I did like Jasper, AB.

I also went up to that tea house on Lake Agnes. A funny thing that happened up there was when a bird dive bombed our tea bread and jelly basket and caused a chorus of screams from tourists on the porch.
 

PlannerByDay

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Greenescapist said:
I agree with you about Banff. It was just so rich and unauthentic. Field, BC was a cute little moutain town and I did like Jasper, AB.

I also went up to that tea house on Lake Agnes. A funny thing that happened up there was when a bird dive bombed our tea bread and jelly basket and caused a chorus of screams from tourists on the porch.
Great Pictures,

I went to Fields and at lunch at the little grocery store/deli on the corner across the the old water tower. A very neat town. I stayed in Canmore. That is a really laid back town. Larger than Banff but with about 1/8 of the tourists.

Moraine Lake was cool, we canoed there and sayed one night in one of the Moraine Lake Lodge Cabins That was an expensive night but well worth every penny of it
 

roger

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Jessie-J said:
Pedernales Falls or Lost Maples

Big Bend in the winter

all in Texas, of course... :)
I second the vote for Big Bend. Probably the best kept secret in the National Park system. Especially if you like solitude. :)
 

The One

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Here are a few

Anywhere on Mt. Desert Island Maine (Echo Lake)
Anywhere between Dubois and Pinedale Wyoming
Anywhere between Dubois and Yellowstone Wyoming
Mt. Kenya, Kenya Africa
Lost Park Campground- 20 miles SE of Jefferson, Colorado
Flamingo, Everglades in July.....ha ha ha....just kidding.....in February
 

cololi

Cyburbian
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1,185
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22
Anywhere around Moab
Uinta mountains in UT
Anywhere outside of an organized campground in Yosemite, Yellowstone, Grand Teton National Park
Napali Coast, Kauai
Rocky Mt National Park
Beartooths, MT
Wind River Range, WY
 

nighthawk1959

Cyburbian
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334
Points
11
Blue Ridge Parkway

I don't know about best places but the best trip was my father and myself, two motorcycles, and the Parkway from Cherokee NC to Front Royal VA. about a 3-4 day trip. great memories
 

lec9496

Member
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128
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I like the Denali National Park & Denali State Park areas. When the mountain is out, the view is amazing. With the National Park, you have the option of taking the bus into the park, hike for as long as you want, then catch the bus out or to a different area to keep hiking. Bears are an issue though.

I also like the Homer Spit. You can camp on the sand within a few meters of the ocean.
 

thestip

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Cranberry Lake in the Adirondack Mountains, NY
Algonquin Park, Ontario
Isle Royale, Michigan
 

Trail Nazi

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Cumberland Island, Georgia is a beautiful place and is perfect for camping with the mosquitos, if you want to camp with them. Aside from those pesky creatures, it is a picturesque Southern island that is relaxed and a perfect place to get away from it all. (JFK, Jr also wed there.)
 
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