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Biomass power generation

fringe

Cyburbian
Messages
634
Points
17
I live near two biomass power generation plants in two adjacent counties that are generating howls of protest from neighboring areas. The plant operators initially proposed burning "clean C&D", but now are burning creosoted rail ties.

Anyone here dealt with this kind of operation?
 

Maister

Chairman of the bored
Staff member
Moderator
Messages
28,414
Points
71
I live near two biomass power generation plants in two adjacent counties that are generating howls of protest from neighboring areas. The plant operators initially proposed burning "clean C&D", but now are burning creosoted rail ties.

Anyone here dealt with this kind of operation?
No I haven't. How is it known they're burning rail ties? I take it this is more than just a rumor?
 

fringe

Cyburbian
Messages
634
Points
17
A very twisted permitting path led to the tie burning. Almost immediately the locals grabbed their pitchforks and stormed the county commission.

The crosstie burning may well be outlawed in weeks, but they also have problems with waste water and ash disposal.

See link to local story. It is another example of big corporations located most polluting activities in rural settings.

 

shell_waster

Cyburbian
Messages
243
Points
10
I've been following this story since the news broke. I don't imagine it is safe to inhale creosote particulate matter and that is what neighbors have been doing for many months now, not to mention the livestock. I wonder what incentives Veolia Energy received from state and local levels for developing these sites? I imagine multi-year tax abatements, work force training, reduce or waived permit fees, etc.
 

fringe

Cyburbian
Messages
634
Points
17
We have learned that Veolia Energy was the company that performed the infamous water supply switchover in Flint, MI.

One of the two afflicted counties ran a new water line to feed the plant, and went way into to debt to get it done. Then the plant operators started juggling their permits and ended up permitted to burn ties.

GA is having more trouble with industries looking for dumping grounds, and with utilities coal ash disposals.

Pasted below is a letter to paper I sent in December.




Dear editor,


The story of the ongoing imbroglio over operations at the biomass energy plants in Colbert and Carnesville looks like one lifted from the pages of Southern literature.


Like Flannery O’Connor’s traveling Bible salesman, or even like Twain’s well-known King and Duke, some slick operators from who knows where rattled into town some years back and sold the local yokels a bill of goods, some bottles of snake oil, or some magic beans.


The locals were fooled into providing considerable logistical support for an operation that turns out to be a full frontal assault on the public’s health and safety.


The operators’ initial presentation promised clean, safe, “renewable” energy generation, but they certainly knew, as early as 2016, that a dirty alternative was fully permissible under recently reversed regulations.


What we see now is a heavy drop of the fruits of a popular political sentiment that holds all government regulation, at any level, as pesky, irrelevant, and distasteful.


Such sentiment deifies the private sector as the only means of efficient operation of any activity. It vilifies public servants as hapless, bungling bureaucrats, that only work like a sea anchor to slow the swift clipper of the private market on its full sail voyage toward a glorious and golden yonder shore.


The regulation reversal that applies carries the curious irony of application only to corporate entities. Individuals cannot burn even one old tie, yet corporations can burn thousands. There is no more smelly example of “corporate welfare”, a funny fat-cat flip-flop of Reagan’s iconic and false myth of the “welfare queen”.


A recent Madison Journal story about Franklin County shows Carnesville locals as being wised up and ready to ride the impostors out of town on a rail, just like Twain’s colorful King and Duke. Madison County, having mortgaged its future on the carpetbaggers’ pitch, cannot afford such relief, and is left only to deal with the devil it thought it knew.


Jim Baird


Comer. GA
 
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