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Buffalo, New York - Williamsville [w/images]

Dan

Dear Leader
Staff member
Moderator
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18,200
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Practically every city in the Northeastern United States has at least one of these neighborhoods ... a foo-foo, sugary sweet village with a "carriage trade" business district that caters primarily to upper middle class women.

Buffalo has a few such communities; East Aurora is the most famous, but there's also the Village of Orchard Park, and the Village of Williamsville. This thread shows off Williamsville, a few kilometers east of the University at Buffalo South Campus.

Williamsville was founded in the mid-1800s around Glen Falls, where Ellicott Creek plunges over the Ononadaga Moraine. From the 1890s to the 1930s, an interurban line served the village, promoting residential development. Since World War II, Williamsville has evolved into an affluent residential community, increasingly absorbed into the sprawl of Buffalo's booming Northtowns.

Since busy Main Street runs through the heart of Williamsville (four traffic lanes, two parking lanes, and a center "suicide lane" for left turns), there isn't much pedestrian traffic, even with the area's textbook quaintness.

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Dan

Dear Leader
Staff member
Moderator
Messages
18,200
Points
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Williamsville has some impressive residential areas. Like Main Street, they scream "quaint," but fortunately they experience far less vehicle traffic.

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The reason for Williamsville's existence: Ellicott Creek and Glen Falls.

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The end.

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tsc

Cyburbian
Messages
1,905
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23
what huge signs..... way out of scale for the area. The women should demand better design guidelines for their shopping district....
 

Rem

Cyburbian
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1,524
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23
Thanks again Dan.

You captured the 'absence of pedestrians - plenty of cars' look pretty well. I see that suburbs get knocked a fair bit on Cyburbia, but the residential area looks pretty nice for family living to me.

The heaviness of some of the overhead cabling struck me in some of the commercial district photos. There appeared to be some bundled cable that I assume is TV or Broadband? I wonder if there was any controversy surrounding its installation? There are some other shots without any overhead wires - the residents in those areas must have been more successful in their 'discussion' with the Telco maybe.
 

steveanne

Member
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176
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7
Nice, Dan.

I know Williamsville well. I've seen a holiday concert at Williamsville South, shopped at the Wegmans, wondered how the heck Ellicott Creek could possibly twist and turn so much that I drove over it on every single road I was on, and even dated one of the snobby women that hail from the area. The houses there are gorgeous (I think they just did a Trading Spaces episode there too) and a bunch of the Buffalo Sabres live or have lived in that area as well... Nice pics!

I am going home to Rochester for the holidays and I am planning on taking some pictures of one of the other neglected cities in New York. So, plan on some Nick Tahoe's Hots pictures around January '04.
 

Rumpy Tunanator

Cyburbian
Messages
4,473
Points
25
Dan said:
Williamsville has some impressive residential areas. Like Main Street, they scream "quaint," but fortunately they experience far less vehicle traffic.
-On Main Street? They've been complaining about the traffic on Main Street as of late. With more companies looking for the urban oasis in the suburbs, traffic is becoming a problem along Main St. Some people are using res. streets for shortcuts and peak hour travel has been congested for the longest time. There is nothing quaint about this area, its another typical suburban area (even though the village is old) where people are now realizing that there village feel is gone.
 

biscuit

Cyburbian
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3,904
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Rem said:
The heaviness of some of the overhead cabling struck me in some of the commercial district photos. There appeared to be some bundled cable that I assume is TV or Broadband? I wonder if there was any controversy surrounding its installation? There are some other shots without any overhead wires - the residents in those areas must have been more successful in their 'discussion' with the Telco maybe.
This is something I've noticed in many older Northeastern US cities. Here in Pittsburgh all but the most Froo-Froo of neighborhood centers, and most of Downtown, still have this major mess of wires and telephone poles. I know burying these utilities is a major expense but I have always wondered why they were never placed in the allys during the original insallation. Perhaps Dan or someone else could shed some light on that.
 

jordanb

Cyburbian
Messages
3,232
Points
25
biscuit said:
This is something I've noticed in many older Northeastern US cities. Here in Pittsburgh all but the most Froo-Froo of neighborhood centers, and most of Downtown, still have this major mess of wires and telephone poles. I know burying these utilities is a major expense but I have always wondered why they were never placed in the allys during the original insallation. Perhaps Dan or someone else could shed some light on that.
They probably don't have alleys. I noticed that in San Francisco too. Wires all over the fronts of buildings due to a lack of alleys.

I suppose they could bury most of them, but then the cost of installation and maintence is sky high.
 

Rumpy Tunanator

Cyburbian
Messages
4,473
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In the city of Buffalo most of the lines are buried downtown, while most telephone lines are along the end property lines of people's back yards (if this makes sense). I once lived in a carriage house that was on a alley and all of the power/telephone lines where back there.
Suburbs, anything goes.
 

Kathie_WE

Cyburbian
Messages
34
Points
2
Dan,

Great pics! Williamsville is a very nice area -- have close family that live there. The houses in the neighborhoods are pretty diverse actually with a wide range of sizes, styles, and ages which seem to meet a diverse group of income levels. Love the park -- its one of my favorite urban parks anywhere!!!

That said, the Main Street doesn't do anything for me. On visits, I ride bikes and walk the neighborhoods a lot but avoid the Main Street except to cross from one neighborhood to the next. Its really not pedestrian/biker friendly. Too bad because there seems to be some interesting shops....

CHEERS!

Kathie
 
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