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Building Code Question/Interpretation

Habanero

Cyburbian
Messages
3,241
Points
27
If a light switch has to be "readily accessible" (capable of being reached quickly for operation, renewal or inspections, without requiring those to whom ready access is requisite to climb over or remove obstacles or to resort to portable ladders, chairs, etc.)

would you consider a light switch that is not within arms reach but about 2 feet inside a room to the left of the door frame to meet that requirement?
 

ludes98

Cyburbian
Messages
1,264
Points
22
In a word, no. My hall switch is like that and it irritates me. I checked my situation and my problem is the AC sub panel is on the other side of the wall. |-)
 

giff57

Corn Burning Fool
Staff member
Moderator
Messages
5,443
Points
34
I'd say it meets the defintion that you listed. Not very handy, but I would call it acceptible.
 

Howard Roark

Cyburbian
Messages
276
Points
10
Habanero said:
If a light switch has to be "readily accessible" (capable of being reached quickly for operation, renewal or inspections, without requiring those to whom ready access is requisite to climb over or remove obstacles or to resort to portable ladders, chairs, etc.)

would you consider a light switch that is not within arms reach but about 2 feet inside a room to the left of the door frame to meet that requirement?
swing side or hinge side? if swing side yes, if hinge side, no
 

Habanero

Cyburbian
Messages
3,241
Points
27
The door opens to the right, but if anything is ever put on this wall you'd not be able to access the switch.
 

Chet

Cyburbian Emeritus
Messages
10,623
Points
34
Can it be reached by Herve Vilachez? Then yes, its accessible. B-)
 

boiker

Cyburbian
Messages
3,889
Points
26
Nope.. only commercial and industrial or those regularly accessed by the public (gov. buildings) structures must meet ADA requirements. Private residences do not unless they were constructued under certain HUD guidelines/money to create an accessible unit.
 

Plannerbabs

Cyburbian
Messages
1,037
Points
23
There's also the idea of "visitability", though--the idea that every house should at least be accessible and have a bathroom that is accessible for visitors who may be handicapped. Then again, most visitors don't go around turning lights on and off, so I'm not sure how far you'd want to go with that, beyond being able to get in the front door, bathroom, and living room etc.
 
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