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Buried locomotive recovered

JNL

Cyburbian
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2,449
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Was this common practice elsewhere, to bury locomotives that had been made obolete by newer engines? I saw a news item on another engine recently, a steam locomotive that had been buried, discovered recently, and recovered and fully restored. The news item showed the keen enthusiasts who had restored it taking it on it's maiden journey since restoration.

I don't think you'd get away with burying obsolete trains any more. They just send 'em to New Zealand and we keep using 'em :)

HUNK OF HISTORY UNCOVERED

Blenheim, May 7 - Workers on a $6 million sewerage scheme in Blenheim have uncovered a 100-year-old, five tonne traction engine.

While digging part of a trench near the Burleigh Bridge on Tuesday, digger driver Waina Wynyard heard a crash and immediately told Fulton Hogan site engineer Mike Winkler.

Under worksite protocols any newly discovered artefacts have to be investigated. The traction engine, buried about 2m underground, was covered back over so it would not be disturbed and excavation began in earnest on Wednesday.

With some delicate crane manoeuvring around a fibre optic cable and a bit of hard work by DM Contractors drainlayer Darrin Meek, the traction engine was finally brought to the surface.

Opus International environmental planner and site engineer Victoria Fray said other objects dug up included some old boots and bottles.

Brayshaw Museum Park vintage farm machinery publicity officer Bob Thoms said that the traction engine was hard to date but he guessed it was an early Ruston and Procter model made in the 1890s.

Mr Thoms said the newly found traction engine was too far gone to be restored but parts from it could still possibly be used.

Many traction engines had been used in Marlborough during the early 1900s as they were the only heavy agricultural machinery available, he said.

They were used for a range of jobs from helping to establish farms through to construction work such as ramming piles for bridges.

Also found this:
http://www.employmentmatters.net.nz/story.asp?id=780
 

Cardinal

Cyburbian
Messages
10,080
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34
Warren Dunes, in southwest Michigan, has at least one Chicago streetcar buried in a dune (or at least it did). About twenty years ago I was camping with some friends there, and we came across it.
 

boilerplater

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916
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21
Buried at sea

Isn't a traction engine essentially a farm tractor with a steam boiler for power? What we call a locomotive pulls trains.

Occasionally you'll read about some old NYC subway cars being buried at sea off the coast to form artificial reefs. Gives the fish something to hide in, raise young in, etc. Seems to be a common fate for old ships too.
 

SGB

Cyburbian
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3,388
Points
26
The developer I worked for one summer as a laborer buried an old pickup truck at a job site after it had an uneventful but anticipated death.

IIRC, the location they buried it in was floodplain/wetland. 8-!
 

JNL

Cyburbian
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2,449
Points
25
boilerplater said:
Isn't a traction engine essentially a farm tractor with a steam boiler for power? What we call a locomotive pulls trains.

Um, yeah :-$ I read about a locomotive that was dug up recently, then I saw this, and it reminded me of the locomotive... but I couldn't find the other item so I posted this one.

I'll make sure I don't mix up my engines in future ;)
 

Dan

Dear Leader
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Old thread, but I came across it looking at the bot visitor list.

In the community where I was working at in Florida, workers uncovered the remains of old railroad locomotive when they were digging for a new pool. It was a couple of blocks away from a long-abandoned railroad ROW, but we couldn't find any record of tracks leading to the site.

The remains were rusted through in a lot of spots, and restoration just wasn't feasible. From what I remember, the locomotive was pulled out of the ground in pieces, and hauled off for recycling.
 

RandomPlanner

Cyburbian
Messages
1,762
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Old thread, but I came across it looking at the bot visitor list.

In the community where I was working at in Florida, workers uncovered the remains of old railroad locomotive when they were digging for a new pool. It was a couple of blocks away from a long-abandoned railroad ROW, but we couldn't find any record of tracks leading to the site.

The remains were rusted through in a lot of spots, and restoration just wasn't feasible. From what I remember, the locomotive was pulled out of the ground in pieces, and hauled off for recycling.
Slightly off-topic: The most interesting element in trying to uncover undocumented history is that we can make hypotheses but we really never know. I'm thinking of an old uncle who had a large vehicle collection. He actually had a train car brought to his house on a barge in the Atlantic because it was the easiest and cheapest way to go from Point A to Point B and he just wanted it. If somehow, it had remained hidden for 100 years, would future researchers be able to determine that it was brought over as part of a collection or would they, also, be looking for evidence of tracks out to the location?
 
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