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Buses Gain Muscle in Road Wars (Article)

Tranplanner

maudit anglais
Messages
7,903
Points
35
Toronto Star Article

Does anyone out there live in a jurisdiction where this practice is in force? I am leery about enforcement, and about the practicality of buses being able to move back into traffic on high-speed roadways.
 

Rem

Cyburbian
Messages
1,524
Points
23
Yes, a bus signalling its intention to leave the kerb has the right of way over any vehicle in a travelling lane behind it in NSW. It doesn't legally apply to lane changes but it seems the practice of yielding is now universally accepted for moving vehicles as well.

It works well over here. It was introduced a few years ago now - certainly within the last ten. There was a period where it took some car drivers a while to understand the rule (you know the type - live under a rock, never read a newspaper or watch TV, didn't know it was coming) and there was some belligerance for a while but I never see that now.
 

jresta

Cyburbian
Messages
1,474
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23
This is interesting b/c i just finished reading this bus/shoulder feasibility study . . .

It's on US Route 9 in New Jersey, which is a very congested corridor that runs, for these purposes, from central NJ north to NYC

it looks just like this (Rt. 1 is actually featured here)


most principal arterials in NJ look like this. 2 or 3 lanes in each direction with a concrete divider (jersey barrier) and a 8-10 ft. shoulder w/curb that is used as a decel lane.

You obviously can't turn left with the divider so all traffic has to exit the highway just as you would on a freeway - from the right lane - on ramps we call "jughandles". Not only is it much safer but it keeps the slow/turning traffic in the right lane - it's also much easier to synchronize signals when left turn arrows aren't in the equation.

This is a very busy bus corridor running at 12 minutes or better headways throughtout the day and late into the night and carrying some 20,000 people per day.

At any rate, the shoulder has always been a de facto bus lane (albeit, illegal) on busy highways like Rt. 9 - but more because people won't let the bus back into the travel lane after it pulls off on the shoulder to pick up passengers.

The shoulder is now in the process of being upgraded to officialy accomodate buses (signs will go up saying "bus & right turn only")but in several places, some of them bridges, where buses have to merge back into the general travel lane this could become a helpful part of the solution.
 

nuovorecord

Cyburbian
Messages
444
Points
13
Oregon has a state law which mandates that traffic yield to buses pulling back into the traffic lane. Most buses are equipped with flashing "yield" lights on the left rear of the bus. To my knowledge, there hasn't been any major controversy over this law, which was passed in 2001.
 

ilikefish0

Cyburbian
Messages
204
Points
9
The problem withg stuff like this is that no one wants to get behind a bus. In New Orleans, at least, if a bus manages to get in front of you, there will invariably be about two other buses waiting at the next stop, forcing trhe bus that you let over to stop in a traffic lane. This process then makes you late for school.
 

jordanb

Cyburbian
Messages
3,232
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25
ilikefish0 said:
The problem withg stuff like this is that no one wants to get behind a bus.
That's not a problem with the law, it's the reason why there needs to be a law.
 

nerudite

Cyburbian
Messages
6,544
Points
30
nuovorecord said:
Oregon has a state law which mandates that traffic yield to buses pulling back into the traffic lane. Most buses are equipped with flashing "yield" lights on the left rear of the bus. To my knowledge, there hasn't been any major controversy over this law, which was passed in 2001.
Edmonton has something similar. It seemed like a common sense thing to me, so I assumed a lot of places do this... I have never heard of any problems.
 
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