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buying a digital camera

JNA

Cyburbian Plus
Messages
25,816
Points
61
I am looking to buy a digital camera
Is this a question for "The Throbbing Brain"

currently have a traditional 35 mm - manual only w/ 3 lens
28, 50, 75-150
 

martini

Cyburbian
Messages
678
Points
19
Cool, welcome to the digital age. Whatcha gonna use it for? Seems like you can get a ton of features for a really good price now.

For someplace to start, I'd go with at least 3 megapixels. One thing I wish I had on mine is a 'burst' mode, where the camera will take shots in rapid fire action, saving each one to internal memory before storing it to a card. Saving images to the card takes a second or so, potentially having you miss the item or action you were intending to shoot. Durability is not really much of a concern any longer, they're built kinda tough now-a-days. This mini-video caputre is really nice. On a 128mb card, you can store almost 5 min of video, sometimes 'tricking' the camera into more.

One thing you'll notice right away w/digital is the lag 'tween hitting the botton and the shutter articulating. It's annoying, but you'll get used to it soon enough.



What ever you do, keep the manual as a back up, 'cause the digi will give up the ghost at inoportune moments. Or the lack of batteries....
 

SGB

Cyburbian
Messages
3,388
Points
26
[rant]If you are buying the digi camera as a gift, make sure the recipient really wants one and is actually willing to open it and read the !@#$! manual. [/rant]
 

donk

Cyburbian
Messages
6,970
Points
30
If you've got the cash and the lenses fit I'd look at a canon eos digital slr. I only wish my old AE1/F1 lenses would fit .

If my bikes did not need a giant overhaul next spring I'd be all over a new camera system.

We have a canon here in the office that I really like, it was expensive, but it works well and has lots of features. My parent's have had good luck with their high end consumer nikon.

Depending on what you are doing, you may also want to look at some of the new DVD camcorders.
 

Cardinal

Cyburbian
Messages
10,080
Points
34
I would echo donk's comments, but i really suppose it depends on how you will be using it. I have been shooting with 35mm Canons for about fifteen years. The advantage to getting the Digital Rebel body is that I could use the same lenses and accessories that I already have for my Elan. Its controls would likely be easier to learn, since they are similar to the other Canons.

That is a good set-up for the serious photographer. It can cost quite a bit more. The body is twice the cost of a point-and-shoot, and if you don't have lenses, figure on spending anywhere from $200 on up on each. If you want something for more casual use, where you don't need to mess with lenses, and it is small enough to fit in a pocket, get a good point-and-shoot. Five megapixel cameras are now pretty affordable. They provide a noticably better picture.
 

Trail Nazi

Cyburbian
Messages
2,779
Points
24
I use at least one digital camera a day, sometimes more for a project that I have (at least one photo of the baby for the first year of his life). (Husband is a camera company rep, so I have a whole slew of cameras to choose from.) It all depends on what you want to use your camera for and how large you want to make prints from. The reality is that you don’t need something super fancy to make good pictures. The most important things I would ask are: Do you want a point and shoot type (or a PhD camera – push here dummy) or do you want a digital SLR camera? Also, are you brand loyal, if so, you may want to stick with your brand.
 
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