• Cyburbia is a friendly big tent, where we share our experiences and thoughts about urban planning practice, planning adjacent topics, and whatever else comes to mind. No ads, no spam, no echo chambers. Create your FREE Cyburbia ID, and join us today! You can also register through your Reddit, Facebook, Google, Twitter, or Microsoft account.

Calling Lyle Lanley...Monorail !!!

prudence

Cyburbian
Messages
688
Points
20
Anybody in Seattle have info on the monorail thay will be buliding?? The $1-BIL plus project passed referendum last month with a 50.24% majority...
 

Wannaplan?

Galactic Superstar
Messages
3,149
Points
27
Another one?!!

Geez, the piece of junk they already have should be torn down.

Must be all that rain.
 

nerudite

Cyburbian
Messages
6,544
Points
30
The approved plan for the first phase was adopted in August of last year by the Elevated Transportation Company. Now that the citizen petition has passed in Seattle, this "company" has been morphed into the Seattle Popular Monorail Authority. There is one intial line (the green line) that will have a basically north/south route from Ballard to West Seattle (going through the major sites in and around downtown). Supposedly this first line will be built and operating in five years. Future lines will require additional ballot measures. A map of the green line route, and future routes and a great
FAQ can be found at the SPMA website.
 

Cardinal

Cyburbian
Messages
10,080
Points
34
Monorail

Lyle Lanley: Well, sir, there's nothing on earth
Like a genuine,
Bona fide,
Electrified,
Six-car
Monorail!
What'd I say?

Ned Flanders: Monorail!

Lyle Lanley: What's it called?

Patty+Selma: Monorail!

Lyle Lanley: That's right! Monorail!

[crowd chants `Monorail' softly and rhythmically]

Miss Hoover: I hear those things are awfully loud...

Lyle Lanley: It glides as softly as a cloud.

Apu: Is there a chance the track could bend?

Lyle Lanley: Not on your life, my Hindu friend.

Barney: What about us brain-dead slobs?

Lyle Lanley: You'll be given cushy jobs.

Abe: Were you sent here by the devil?

Lyle Lanley: No, good sir, I'm on the level.

Wiggum: The ring came off my pudding can.

Lyle Lanley: Take my pen knife, my good man.

I swear it's Springfield's only choice...
Throw up your hands and raise your voice!

All: Monorail!

Lyle Lanley: What's it called?

All: Monorail!

Lyle Lanley: Once again...

All: Monorail!

Marge: But Main Street's still all cracked and broken...

Bart: Sorry, Mom, the mob has spoken!

All: Monorail!
Monorail!
Monorail!

[big finish]

Monorail!

Homer: Mono... D'oh!
 

nerudite

Cyburbian
Messages
6,544
Points
30
Michael Stumpf said:
Barney: What about us brain-dead slobs?

Lyle Lanley: You'll be given cushy jobs.

Lol... I forgot the lyrics... now it will be my sticky song for the day.

Oh yeah... BTW... the SPMA has cushy jobs open.
 

Howard Roark

Cyburbian
Messages
276
Points
10
A city with money is like a Mule with a spinning Wheel, no one knows how he got it, and darn if he knows how to use it!

On a serious note, is this the most efficent thing they could come up with? I don't want to sound like Wendel Cox, but there has got to be a better way to move people at a less prohibitive cost.
 

Cardinal

Cyburbian
Messages
10,080
Points
34
There probably are more efficient ways to move people, but will they use them? I think one of the problems with transit in our country is that middle class people often prefer not to ride buses because they would then need to associate with "those people." Trains have had some success where there was an established rail network to begin with. Chicago is a great example of this, though waning in its utilization as jobs have become more dispered.

Light rail and monorail are always sexy, monorail perhaps more so. Just ask Walt Disney. I suspect some aspect of land assembly or terrain may be the reason behind their choice of monorail. I wonder if, in the end, it may be something akin to Chicago's "L" (elevated local train service in the downtown area).
 

green22

Cyburbian
Messages
101
Points
6
Seattle hasn't yet chosen which of the 3 types of monorails it is building. I heard that it is possible that they might build a system similar to Vancouver's. Athough I have not ridden on the Vancouver system it is supposed to be moving people quite well. As for the critique of monorail and light rail over bus. I've used many light rail systems in Philly, Boston and New Jersey that move people much more efficiently than buses, especially if on their own reserved rights of way. Freways and arterials with few cross streets give the advantage to autos over transit. Rapid transit gives the advantage to transit use over cars. If planners continue to zone subdivisions only for auto use served by highways which are expanded and widened, while not investing in rapid transit, then transit use will continue to go down and car use up.
 

Jeff

Cyburbian
Messages
4,161
Points
27
Do we have a big donut to stop the thing, or is this monorail going to have brakes that work?
 

Howard Roark

Cyburbian
Messages
276
Points
10
Michael Stumpf said:
There probably are more efficient ways to move people, but will they use them?

I don't have a problem with spending a little to make things more desirable but the numbers on this just scream waste, 14 miles, 1.7 billion dollars (according to Newsweek) that is over 12o million per mile. I seem to recall light rail costing about 20 million per miles, makes it look like they are giving it away in comparison.

Was this just a cool ruse (everyone has light rail, we will have monorail!) or is it really necessary based on existing conditions in Seattle? I don't know enough about the city to comment, but it seems they could have gone with a less maintaince intensive subway for a similar amount
 

Cardinal

Cyburbian
Messages
10,080
Points
34
Howard Roark said:
Michael Stumpf said:
There probably are more efficient ways to move people, but will they use them?

I don't have a problem with spending a little to make things more desirable but the numbers on this just scream waste, 14 miles, 1.7 billion dollars (according to Newsweek) that is over 12o million per mile. I seem to recall light rail costing about 20 million per miles, makes it look like they are giving it away in comparison.

Was this just a cool ruse (everyone has light rail, we will have monorail!) or is it really necessary based on existing conditions in Seattle? I don't know enough about the city to comment, but it seems they could have gone with a less maintaince intensive subway for a similar amount
I wish I knew the answer. I would guess that much of the cost is in property acquisition, which asks the question; why not a subway? Or for that matter, consider again Chicago's L. Built over 100 years ago, it is still heavily used and a believe was recently expanded. It is built in the street right of way.
 

Jeff

Cyburbian
Messages
4,161
Points
27
We got one in Philly (an El), it's great. Carries 1000s every day.
 

green22

Cyburbian
Messages
101
Points
6
One of the advantages of monorail is that the overhead rails look better than the els. Philly is planning to rebuild the west leg of the Market Frankford el over Market. I looked at the sketches and it resembles a 2 lane concrete highway viaduct with single supports. The city is trying to remake Market into a vibrant main street. It already has a lot of bars.
 

Quail64

Cyburbian
Messages
55
Points
4
Also, a bit about Seattle. I live pretty far away (Spokane), but I know it pretty well. I think light rail is overall implausible there because of the existing gridlock on the ground, its unbelievable. Light rail would probably just end up hurting more than anything. It would also probably be very expensive to build in the first place and to maintain the way Seattle is set up. As far as that goes, either an elevated track or a subway was needed.

I think they vouched for the monorail because a) They already built one line B) People here are unable to see the long term benefits of constructing a subway system and are unwilling to sacrifice the time neccesary for constructing one C) Monorails add a sexy look to the downtown that fits into the Seattle image D) Downtown transportation in Seattle seems more about image than commuting anyways so what the heck.

What Seattle really needs is commuter trains that connect to the suburbs and sattelite cities around it so people can actually commute. There are alot of people around Seattle and that's where the traffic is the worse.

Overall I think the expanded system will be good for downtown Seattle, but its not what the Seattle area needs in order to really get its people on mass transit.
 
Top