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Canada and inclusionary zoning...

nerudite

Cyburbian
Messages
6,544
Points
30
I'm working with an Affordable Housing Advisory Board (AHAB... I guess NIMBYism will be our giant whale)... and we are working on various options for trying to diversify our affordable housing stock. Despite that my humble town of St. Albert is in a different country than the city I have the most experience with affordable housing initiatives (Davis, CA), the communities are very similar. Davis had a really comprehensive affordable housing program, owing it's relative success to strict inclusionary zoning.

I was trying to find an example of where inclusionary zonig has worked in Canada... and lo and behold, guess what? There are no cities that use this as a tool (well according to Canadian Housing Information Centre)!

What I can't figure out is why? I would assume that there is some type of legislative reason why... but the report I read did not claim any. I've been pouring over Alberta Planning Law books and I can't find anything... anyone know what the hurdles are? I'm going to look into a few more leads, but otherwise, I have no idea where to go next.

All help appreciated!
 

donk

Cyburbian
Messages
6,970
Points
30
I think I know what you mean by "inclusionary zoning", but am not sure. If you would explain it a bit I'll try to provide an answer. (ie what does it do and how does it do it)
 

SCM

Member
Messages
19
Points
1
An inclusionary zoning ordinance is a policy that either ties development approval for projects of a certain size to , or creates regulatory incentives for, the provision of low- and moderate-income housing as part of a proposed development. One of the benefits of this type of program is that it ensures that the natural market mechanisms that drive private residential development also create integrated affordable units without utilizing local tax dollars. In one way or another these policies imply that the private sector should or could bear a portion of the burden for the provision of affordable housing in those municipalities in which it conducts business (ie: if a developer makes lots of money from building and selling market rate units in a community, he/she should give back to that community in the form of affordable housing units).

In Canada, the provision of social services/goods is still thought of, primarily, as government's responsibility. This may be one of the reasons, regulatory incentives such as inclusionary zoning have not been adopted their yet.

Hope this helps.
 

The One

Cyburbian
Messages
8,289
Points
29
Attainable Housing

I like the term attainable housing, and this term seems to be less difficult to get by the NIMBY's and BANANA's....

Some codes allow for smaller lots and corresponding smaller homes in an attempt to lower the cost of housing units in a subdivision (also variation in the materials used) as long as the homes built exhibit significantly lower cost and are "attainable" by lower income families (can also be defined)

Check out the Pitkin County/City of Aspen regulations
 

nerudite

Cyburbian
Messages
6,544
Points
30
Whoa... this old thread has been resurrected! I have found some of my answers since my initial question a few years back, so maybe I should update this. Planning legislation in Canada varies from province to province. Some provinces allow for inclusionary zoning (B.C./Ontario), and some don't (Alberta :-@). Some of the best examples are in the Vancouver metro region, just in case some other lost Canadian needs one sometime. I'm hoping that some of the Sustainable Cities initiatives will spur some changes to Provincial planning legislation to allow for inclusionary zoning. Without it, we are pretty much hooped.
 
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