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Cheap Power Discussion

garethace

Cyburbian
Messages
137
Points
6
Who can just remember those cold, cold days of the 1960s. K-19 'The Widow-killer', starring Harrison Ford and another Irish man called Liam Nesson. It describes an aspect to the cold war - namely the sacrifices, accidents and sorrow of that time.

I like the way the film does its best to represent the age, the aspirations, the beliefs and so on.

That 'technology was the future and religious icons' were not allowed in the 'reactor room'.

The aspiration of free power for every household, nuclear powered cars and travel to other planets. It seemed that all that HAD to happen.

Look out for some pretty old, looking analogue kind of instrumentation and equipment - if you care for a trip down through memory lane in that regard.

My folks have always told me it was hard in those days, for example the young men on the sub, didn't at all know what going in to fix a nuclear reactor was about. They thought that 'chemical suits' would somehow protect them.

Anyhow, it is a very dark representation of the 1960s era. But possibly one that is quite true also. I am comparing it to the 'cowboy John waynes, and Clint Eastwood movies' that most people would have known back then.

I am wondering, what architects and urban planners of the 1960s thought the world would be like now? Is anyone old enough to remember?

I mean, the big motorway construction across Europe after the war, and the promise of this unlimited supply of cheap power? The way mass usage of motorways and automobiles have broken down the fabrics of community life.

It MUST have dictated more than a bit, of how they actually saw the world. Bearing in mind, that few people were thinking ecologically yet at this time - 1960s disposable culture and so on... or am i wrong?

Of course in present day Ukraine, there are still worries about safety. Old people there are still living within 100 miles of the reactor disaster area. But young people are the biggest losers, and the generations after them.
 

jresta

Cyburbian
Messages
1,474
Points
23
Europe's promise of cheap power in the 60's was our promise to take their nuclear waste. Most of it's stored at the SRS in South Carolina. Check out their website http://www.srs.gov
This is downstream from the watershed they were flooding in the book/film Deliverance.

They're constantly recalling old employees to tell them that they were exposed to this or that and that they need to be checked for various types of cancer.

Westinghouse, the SRS, and depleted uranium bullets. Throw in CBS news and it's a perfect match.
 

biscuit

Cyburbian
Messages
3,904
Points
25
This is what a portion of that Deliverance river valley looks like today (Actually it's the Keowee, Jocasee and Whitewater river-valleys)



The lakes were formed by Duke Energy for, get this...a giant nuclear power plant and a bevy of hydro plants. Even more stuff to ship downstate to SRS.
 

garethace

Cyburbian
Messages
137
Points
6
You can hear the X-Files theme music in the background for sure, and it isn't aliens they are after.

I watched a documentary about the US and Australian troops who had to occupy Hiroshima after the war.

Every single one of them almost are dead now - all from cancer. The Australian government never paid out any form of service pension, benefit or casualty claims. Fifty years on now, the poor old service men and women and still trying to fight their battle against the Australian government!

Its terrifying stuff, thankfully my generation hasn't had to live through a much hardship.
 

Chet

Cyburbian Emeritus
Messages
10,623
Points
34
garethace said:
Its terrifying stuff, thankfully my generation hasn't had to live through a much hardship.
Whah? Never heard of Gulf War Syndrome?
 

garethace

Cyburbian
Messages
137
Points
6
Yeah, i stand corrected there. Ireland is a neutral country, but after today - Europe seems to have come up with a European constitution document of some sorts, which expands ideas about defense against terrorism etc.

So our neutrality might be about to end. We did have alot of US planes re-fueling here already, and there was great giving out about that.
 

jresta

Cyburbian
Messages
1,474
Points
23
garethace said:

Every single one of them almost are dead now - all from cancer. The Australian government never paid out any form of service pension, benefit or casualty claims. Fifty years on now, the poor old service men and women and still trying to fight their battle against the Australian government!
What?! The australian gov't not compensating people for their losses (much less apologize)? I don't believe it!
 

garethace

Cyburbian
Messages
137
Points
6
Correct, apparently there was some scandal back in 1945 because the young Australian soldiers were setting up brothels for themselves, and trying to care for the women having STDs etc. Some Australian big wig came out to inspect operations in Nagasaki or Hiroshima and found what was going on, and told the soldiers they were a disgrace to their nations self-respect, or something to that effect. It was an interesting documentary, i think it is still a political issue now in Australia. A lot of Australian service men married Japanesse women, and are stil together.
 
Messages
7,649
Points
29
garethace said:
I mean, the big motorway construction across Europe after the war, and the promise of this unlimited supply of cheap power? The way mass usage of motorways and automobiles have broken down the fabrics of community life.

It MUST have dictated more than a bit, of how they actually saw the world. Bearing in mind, that few people were thinking ecologically yet at this time - 1960s disposable culture and so on... or am i wrong? [/B]
No, there weren't many folks thinking about it back then. In the 1950's and 1960's, people were just beginning to take notice. I believe 1969 was the first year that federal legislation in America was passed dealing with environmental issues. The '60s were sort of the 'birth' of concern about these issues, which means it wasn't terribly widespread. Yet.
 

Rem

Cyburbian
Messages
1,523
Points
23
garethace said:
The Australian government never paid out any form of service pension, benefit or casualty claims. Fifty years on now, the poor old service men and women and still trying to fight their battle against the Australian government!
The Australian Government pays a pension to all Service Men and Woman. The pension is higher for those that served overseas. Service men and women also receive other social benefits. The above information is therefore inaccurate.

The Australian Govt. does however have a sad history when it comes to special compensation for specific events/activities. Denying the long term ill-effects from the use of Agent Orange (defoliant) in Vietnam (wartime) or the Voyager disaster (peacetime) are two sorry examples.
 

jresta

Cyburbian
Messages
1,474
Points
23
Rem said:
The Australian Government pays a pension to all Service Men and Woman. The pension is higher for those that served overseas. Service men and women also receive other social benefits. The above information is therefore inaccurate.

The Australian Govt. does however have a sad history when it comes to special compensation for specific events/activities. Denying the long term ill-effects from the use of Agent Orange (defoliant) in Vietnam (wartime) or the Voyager disaster (peacetime) are two sorry examples.

yeah, not to say that uncle sam has a better record on these matters, but i was referring more or less to Vietnam vets and aboriginals.
 

Rem

Cyburbian
Messages
1,523
Points
23
jresta said:
yeah, not to say that uncle sam has a better record on these matters, but i was referring more or less to Vietnam vets and aboriginals.
I was attempting to correct Gathercae's statement that no service pensions were paid to a group of servicemen. It is not correct and not a political issue of the day over here.

Ironically the only political issue that raises its head in Australia, from time to time, about WWII and Japan is the absence of an apology for the treatment of POW's. Very rich considering our government's attitude to apologies.
 

garethace

Cyburbian
Messages
137
Points
6
I am delighted someone from down under has actually seen this thread, and cared enough to comment/correct my mistake. However there was a documentary broadcast in this country not too long ago, where they interviewed the people. I cannot imagine it is a very hot political issue, since most of the people are now very old or died.

However, if you do look at a movie such as K-19 Widow Maker, come back here to the thread and just let me know if you feel differently. I mean, when you see a movie like that it might depress you for a while, but then you think of how fortunate we are today, that young men and women do not have to make such sacrifices.

There is an interesting project now called 'Red Storm'. Here is a link if you like to investigate it more:

http://babelfish.altavista.com/babe...co.jp/docs/2003/0715/amd2.htm&lp=ja_en&tt=url
 

LouisvilleSlugger

Cyburbian
Messages
216
Points
9
garethace said:
You can hear the X-Files theme music in the background for sure, and it isn't aliens they are after.

I watched a documentary about the US and Australian troops who had to occupy Hiroshima after the war.
wow. very interesting! never knew about that. yeah, thank goodness I haven't seen anything like that during my short lifetime. and I hope I don't. I think it's so interesting how much of a presence the government has in Roswell despite their claim nothing of signifficance happened...
 
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