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Land use Churches in industrial zones

Maister

Chairman of the bored
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Do you allow churches in industrial zones in your communities?

Industrial properties are attractive to churches with limited budgets because the land tends to be cheaper and a steel building fits right in.

What does RLUIPA have to say about this?
 
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mendelman

Unfrozen Caveman Planner
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Do you allow churches in industrial zones in your communities?

Industrial properties are attractive to churches with limited budgets because the land tends to be cheaper and a steel building fits right in.

What does RLUIPA have to say about this?
We conditionally permit them in all but one of our 12 zoning districts.

It's not permitted or conditionally permitted in our Industrial District, so given that it's conditionally permitted in about 2/3 to 3/5 of our City I'm confident we're ok by RLUIPA.

(RLUIPA...that's one of those things that was huge when I started in the profession in 2002 till about 2006, then poof we moved on to internet cafes and Mary Jane dispensaries.

RLUIPA.

meme_Who_GOTG.jpg
 

Maister

Chairman of the bored
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RLUIPA...that's one of those things that was huge when I started in the profession in 2002 till about 2006, then poof we moved on to internet cafes and Mary Jane dispensaries.
And chickens. Don't forget about chickens.
 

Dan

Dear Leader
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And chickens. Don't forget about chickens.
Portable on demand storage units, shipping containers, and solar facilities over here.

I like looking through old planning publications, and seeing the up-and-coming how-the-hell-do-we-deal-with-that uses of that era. Everybody hated billboards before the Germans even thought of zoning. Hot dog stands were apparently a menace between the 1920s and 1950s. Gas station proliferation was a big deal in the 1950s and 1960s. In the 1980s, it was video game arcades, sexually oriented businesses, and portable signs. In the 1990s, video rental and tattoo parlors. The 2000s were all about wireless facilities. Today, it's tiny houses, ADUs, weed dispensaries (which my community is supposedly going to treat like any other retail use, if/when NYS legalizes rec 420), electronic signs (which we outright ban), ghost kitchens (we've allowed community kitchens for a while now), and huge, often scammy clothing donation boxes. Once building-sized ice vending machines make their way north of the Mason-Dixon line, I think we'll be hearing a lot more about them too. I'm surprised loud, tinny Gas Station TV installations aren't on anybody's radar screen yet.
 

Faust_Motel

Cyburbian
Messages
783
Points
31
Portable on demand storage units, shipping containers, and solar facilities over here.

I like looking through old planning publications, and seeing the up-and-coming how-the-hell-do-we-deal-with-that uses of that era. Everybody hated billboards before the Germans even thought of zoning. Hot dog stands were apparently a menace between the 1920s and 1950s. Gas station proliferation was a big deal in the 1950s and 1960s. In the 1980s, it was video game arcades, sexually oriented businesses, and portable signs. In the 1990s, video rental and tattoo parlors. The 2000s were all about wireless facilities. Today, it's tiny houses, ADUs, weed dispensaries (which my community is supposedly going to treat like any other retail use, if/when NYS legalizes rec 420), electronic signs (which we outright ban), ghost kitchens (we've allowed community kitchens for a while now), and huge, often scammy clothing donation boxes. Once building-sized ice vending machines make their way north of the Mason-Dixon line, I think we'll be hearing a lot more about them too. I'm surprised loud, tinny Gas Station TV installations aren't on anybody's radar screen yet.

We don't churches in industrial zones, but in compliance with state law, they can go there after proving that they need to be there and will comply with local zoning to the extent that it doesn't impinge on their intended functional use as a church.

-Second button down on the right of the gas station TV screen is the "mute button" a few of them have been helpfully labeled with a sticker around me, but it has worked on every one I've tried it on.

-re arcades- have you seen this report from 1980s Boston that was going around a few months back? So good:
 

DVD

Cyburbian
Messages
15,424
Points
53
My current work has a cumulative zoning system so we allow them. I worked for another town in the area that we wanted to get them out of the industrial area because they kept taking up prime industrial buildings that we wanted you know industry to go in. So following the RLUIPA thing we went with no assembly use of any kind in industrial. We took it to mean if assembly is allowed then church is allowed.

Also, why is there a whole institutionalized person part to the RLUIPA thing. It seems odd.
 

bureaucrat#3

Member
Messages
104
Points
8
Deep South.... We allow churches conditionally everywhere.

I fought with the city attorney for a long time about an exemption on the books that removes historic preservation regulations on church properties. They were taking over any adjacent property and demolishing them for parking because they could do so cheaper than other non-residential uses. We finally got the City Council to agree to require historic regulations on any new property churches acquire in our downtown and historic districts.

I'm getting a push right now for adding daycares and worker dormitories in industrial. I'm ok with the daycares, but I worry about adding housing into our industrial. It's mostly Korean companies that are asking for it so they can bring in employees for a couple of years. I don't like the idea of company housing, but I'm not sure if its for land use concerns or more social issues.
 

michaelskis

Cyburbian
Messages
20,602
Points
54
Going back to the original question...

No. We do allow them in many of the commerical districts outside of downtown, and a few of the more dense residential districts. They are a special use permit in the lower density districts and a light intensity neighborhood commerical district classification.

However, I am considering changing our regulations to shift it out of "Churches" or "Religious Organizations" into a use classification of "Places of Assembly" which would expand into fraternal halls, sports venues, concert halls, and similar large mass gathering spaces. From there I will break them into 3 classifications based on size and occupancy. The use it self, from a land use perspective, does to seem distinctively different than other similar venues where you have a mass gathering with short durations of significant impact to the other surrounding uses in the form of traffic and congestion.
 
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