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Cities/metros without Starbucks

Masswich

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DetroitPlanner

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You would have to be nice to me to get me to pay for Starbucks coffee. I normally drink it black so that is the worst tasting coffee I have ever had. I assume they make it that way assuming people are going to want to load it up with creams and sugars. For black coffee drinkers it tastes burnt!
 

rcgplanner

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Interesting how 10 years can change the presence of a company. People used to say Starbucks are everywhere, it is even truer now, even after their contraction in the late 2000's. I know that Peoria, IL has at least 4 locations, with 3 in the city of Peoria and 1 in East Peoria. My fair blue-collar farm community of 100k has SIX Starbucks, including one inside a grocery store that is less than 1/4 of a mile from a stand-alone Starbucks. :not:
 

hilldweller

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Interesting how 10 years can change the presence of a company. People used to say Starbucks are everywhere, it is even truer now, even after their contraction in the late 2000's. I know that Peoria, IL has at least 4 locations, with 3 in the city of Peoria and 1 in East Peoria. My fair blue-collar farm community of 100k has SIX Starbucks, including one inside a grocery store that is less than 1/4 of a mile from a stand-alone Starbucks. :not:
I'm surprised Starbucks has been able to make inroads in so many blue-collar areas.
 

Masswich

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I'm surprised Starbucks has been able to make inroads in so many blue-collar areas.
Well they are not really "Starbucks" all the time. They have more than one model. The "inside the grocery store/Target model"; the "with a drivethrough looking like a Dunkies" model; the "neighborhood coffee shop" model; and the "high end, you'll come here because we have a gas fireplace and sofas even if it is just a Starbucks" model.
 

Dan

Dear Leader
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That's why its called Scarbucks, no?
Charbucks!

I don't want to be all "Well, in Iceland ...:" all the time, but there were a couple of local coffeehouse chains in Reykjavik - Te og Caffe, which like Starbucks, has more polished stores having a consistent feel, and Kaffitar, which has more of an indie feel. Coffee culture is huge in Iceland, and coffee seemed to be one of the few reasonably priced goods in local supermarkets. (I wanted to bring some coffee from Kaffitar with me -- it was really good -- but being a inexperienced international traveler, I feared getting it through Customs.)


Cafe Babalu, one of Reykjavik's more iconic indie coffeehouses. It's owned by an American expat. :usa:

Everybody in Iceland seems to know about Starbucks, but there's none in the country. A tour guide told me that Icelanders like the latest and greatest, and embrace international brands. She feared that if Starbucks came to Iceland, it could drive the local chains out of business, even if the coffee isn't as good, and possibly pose a threat to the country's coffee culture.

Here in little Ithaca, New York, we have two Starbucks, two Dunkin Donuts, an outpost of Tim Horton's, and three local chains: Gimme' Coffee, Ithaca Coffee, and Collegetown Bagels. There's a lot of anti-Starbucks sentiment, but the locations keep much longer hours than the locals, have more reliable wi-fi, and are packed almost all the time.
 
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