City entrances

Streck

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#1
Does anyone have some interesting photos of city entrances or "gateways" to show what makes a good entrance?

If no photos, does anyone have some recommendations on what to do or not do?
 

Dan

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#3
I can tell you what NOT to do. Many small towns around here have a welcome sign with logos of all the services or groups in town. Here is one but I have seen some here in Iowa that have literally 20 logos on them.
Places still do that? Such signage is really old-school Northeast/New England, and I seldom encounter anything like that anymore. I still see them in the Buffalo area, but then again, it's the Buffalo area. :r:

I found that around here in Austin and the 'burbs. there's not many grand entrance monuments, probably because city limits are always expanding.

Very affluent old-money suburbs of Cleveland tend to have very small, often understated signs that hung from a post at the city line.

Olathe, Kansas had a large monument sign that incorporated a waterfall, located in the median of a prominent road. I'm not a fan of Olathe, but they were very good at this kind of branding.
 

arcplans

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#4
My firm has done quite a few gate way entry features (specifically are LA team). This photo is the latest one done in Riverbank,CA along its major highway corridor:




The gateway entry feature was funded through RDA/State DOT funds.

If that doesn't work try the flickr link:
http://www.flickr.com/photos/arcastillo/3589599407/
 

Cardinal

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#5
My favorite is from Sycamore, Illinois. It has been at least 15 years since I was there, and I don't know if the sign exists. As I remember, it was not much mor ethan a simple billboard at the entrance to the city, that read "Life Offers More in Sycamore." Oh yeah, right behind it was a large cemetery.
 

Rygor

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#6
Well, this one's pretty iconic, though I don't think it's really at the "entrance" to the city anymore.

 

Rygor

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#7
This is from my city and an example of what NOT to do. Nobody in a car is going to be able to read this sign travelling at 40mph, so what's the point of including all that information on there?

 

DVD

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#8
A lot of the suburbs of Phoenix are putting up signs like CPSURaf was showing, but with the city name. My city (being one of those suburbs) is still trying to find funding to do some kind of entrance. It would involve some kind of extra landscaping and street scape, plus a sign.

The most effective I've seen for suburbs, is to do a distinct streetscape change. The city of Tempe (outside of Phoenix) uses a different streetsign/stop light than anyone else, so you know when you're in their city.
 

jmello

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#10
Here's one from our city. I was PM on this thing. The talk radio hosts absolutely adore it, not.

 
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Veloise

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#11
^^ Looks like a white cat in a snowstorm!

Here's the one from Sprawlville (where I am 9 to 5).



No one walks here; sidewalks are an afterthought. The dusty trail carved beneath the sign must be fall-out from the adjacent state highway.

Turn around, travel a couple blocks. No sidewalks here, either.
http://maps.google.com/maps?f=q&sou...d=IipioO_zl9UT0rFO1L7xSQ&cbp=12,308.32,,0,5.7

I think the key is to give the sign-monument-thingscape a sense of presence that's in scale with what's nearby. (Back away from the Kentwood sign, compare it with the motel on the same parcel. The Cascade one gets lost amongst all the fast food pedestals.)
 

Rygor

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#12
In our defense, not all of Urbana's entrance signs are that bad. Here is another example at one of our main arterial entrances (sorry a bit small). It's near our "welcome center".



Of course, the University had to do us one better and installed very nice signs at each corner of the the campus and built an actual gateway park, complete with fountain.


(from http://gct13.com/e/20080815/hallene-gateway)
 

Dan

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#13
From a few wealthy Cleveland 'burbs ...







Rule of thumb: the wealthier the suburb, the more understated the sign. Kirtland Hills is one of the wealthiest communities in Ohio.
 
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#14
This is from my city and an example of what NOT to do. Nobody in a car is going to be able to read this sign travelling at 40mph, so what's the point of including all that information on there?

Methinks I smell an IDOT bureaucrat...
 
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#15
Out in these parts there is always a sign next to the deteriorating Lions/Kiwanis/Optimist thingy...a sign glorifying the high school championships from 20 years ago.
 
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#17
That sign from Urbana is almost exactly like the ones in Ann Arbor, MI (in that it is just way too much to read from a car at 55 mph) except in Ann Arbor they list all the sister cities instead of Nobel Prize recipients.

 

Rygor

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#18
^ That's a new one! And I thought listing the Nobel recipients was unique. Actually, the Nobel sign was made for us by twin city Champaign, not IDOT. I believe that Champaign has an almost identical one somewhere.
 
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