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City Stereotypes

Seabishop

Cyburbian
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3,838
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25
Wherever you are in this country you have an image of the character of a place according to what you’ve seen on tv and movies. In RI we’ve benefitted from one of the most kiss-ass tv shows of all time “Providence” (just cancelled) which was terrible but gave us positive exposure nationwide. Providence has many bad neighborhoods that never seemed to make it onto the show. New York seems to have improved from Taxi Driver to Friends. On the other hand, there was that Homicide show that every week showed people getting killed on the blood-red streets of Baltimore.

These seem to be other common images of places from tv and movies:

Boston – Hip, charming college town or tough, backward Irish enclave (Good Will Hunting)

Miami – Fun and carefree but overrun with flashy hispanic drug dealers

Detriot – See 8 Mile

LA – obvious

Portland, OR - Planning utopia where planners are treated like rock stars (OK that one I picked up from Planning School)

The entire Southeastern US - Illiterate slow talking buffoons and hypocritical religious zealots, eating racoon in trailers and shunning enlightenment all for the entertainment of us northerners.

The entire Midwest except for Chicago - Nothing

How do the stereotypes hold up to reality where you are? I’m especially interested in hearing from you Southerners – If I were you, I’d be pretty pissed by now.
 
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5,353
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You forgot New Orleans - public drunkeness, girls gone wild, public nudity and sex, etc.

I'd like to add, for the record, that I have never flashed the twin peaks for beads. ;)
 

Habanero

Cyburbian
Messages
3,241
Points
27
Seabishop said:
How do the stereotypes hold up to reality where you are? I’m especially interested in hearing from you Southerners – If I were you, I’d be pretty pissed by now.

I get a little upset that they feature Texans as stupid or slow- like the Pace Picante commercials or the Subway commercial (like we couldn't comprehend a dog walker or had never seen a poodle being walked).
 

PlannerGirl

Cyburbian Plus
Messages
6,377
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29
You know I will admit I am from the south, graduated high school in BFE Alabama-it was right out of some movie, it was HORRIBLE beyond words. I went to college in NC and beyond the tech crescent along I85 the majority of the state was still in the 50's. Mind you there are exceptions-Asheville etc but it was poor, very very very rural, backwards folks and it was a HUGE step up from Alabama.

*note I know rural does not mean one must be by default backwards but there is rural and then there is trailer with 5 rusted cars, chickens and half doz hound dogs in the yard. oh yes never forget the HUGE satellite dish and brand new camaro.*

Alabama's cash crop is weed, and no I don't mean dandelions. I was actually told when I was ready to graduate college that I should be a teacher, nurse or house wife. Not to worry about going out of state to college, it was not healthy for young women. Most girls were engaged by the Christmas of their senior year and married in June. No college, no real jobs unless you count working at the local Tyson's plant a job to support the house full of kids you were expected to have (average was 4).

Scary as hell
 

OhioPlanner

Cyburbian
Messages
304
Points
11
Ed is set in Ohio
same with the Drew Carey Show

I think both portray Ohio as ordinary with not much excitement.
 

Seabishop

Cyburbian
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3,838
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25
Re: Re: City Stereotypes

TexasPlanner said:



I get a little upset that they feature Texans as stupid or slow- like the Pace Picante commercials or the Subway commercial (like we couldn't comprehend a dog walker or had never seen a poodle being walked).
I'm sure that out of the several million people in Texas someone heard of a dog walker. Texans are always portrayed as actually having certain facial features - A big, boxy face and squinty eyes - like Nick Nolte or Gary Busy, I guess its just a cowboy thing.

I've never been to the South, but after reading PlannerGirl's post I guess there is still some truth to the "I don't need no ejumacation" thing. But there's also Atlanta, Charlotte, Memphis, etc. which are probably alot like every other city for better or worse. Movies are always set in the South for a REASON. If its not blatant racism, that reason is usually the main character's struggle against ignorance in their closed-minded small town.
 

Jeff

Cyburbian
Messages
4,161
Points
27
It's true what they say about Philly...

We will kick your ass if you show up at an Eagles game with a Cowboys jersey on...
 

jestes

Cyburbian
Messages
230
Points
9
Seabishop said:
The entire Southeastern US - Illiterate slow talking buffoons and hypocritical religious zealots, eating racoon in trailers and shunning enlightenment all for the entertainment of us northerners.
Actually, we Southerners are greatly entertained by hearing the misconceptions that you yankees have about us. Yes, we do wear shoes (sometimes even with socks). No we don't all live in trailers (some of us have ordinances that, GASP!!!, regulate them. I do tend to talk a bit slow but am far from illiterate. I am religious and a proud Christian but hardly a zealot. I have never eaten racoon but I have had my share of squirrel jumbalaya, gumbo (with oysters of course), venison, rabbit, and of course a frequent helping of Southern fried catfish.

We do have actual gasoline powered vehicles down here and paved roads. In fact, my County currently has less that 20 total miles of unpaved public roads (out of over 800 total miles). We have real colleges and universities where you can get real degrees. In fact, some of the greatest cultural influences in our society have come from Mississippi. For starters there is the Senate Majority Leader Trent Lott, Singer Jimmy Buffett, Authors William Faulkner and John Grisham, motivational speaker Zig Ziglar, and Green Bay QB Brett Favre. To see others check out this link: http://lott.senate.gov/ms/fame.html

Hey, don't think that I don't like yankees. In fact, as long as you continue to vacation down here, spend your money, and then leave when the money is all spent I will continue to appreciate ya'll.
 
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Re: Re: City Stereotypes

jestes said:


In fact, some of the greatest cultural influences in our society have come from Mississippi. For starters there is the Senate Majority Leader Trent Lott, Singer Jimmy Buffett, Authors William Faulkner and John Grisham, motivational speaker Zig Ziglar, and Green Bay QB Brett Favre. To see others check out this link: http://lott.senate.gov/ms/fame.html
Oh Jestes, I know you didn't just count Trent Lott as a great cultural influence! ;) Hey, where was Jim Varney from? Kidding.

Anyway, I think the cultural perception of the midwest is influenced by Drew Carey, Roseanne and Tommy Boy.

Minnesota=Grumpy old men

Hawaii = Magnum PI

Seattle = Singles
 

Seabishop

Cyburbian
Messages
3,838
Points
25
Re: Re: Re: City Stereotypes

KMateja said:


Anyway, I think the cultural perception of the midwest is influenced by Drew Carey, Roseanne and Tommy Boy.

Minnesota=Grumpy old men

Hawaii = Magnum PI

Seattle = Singles


By far the biggest purveyor of Midwest culture is JOHN COUGAR MELLENCAMP! Bikers riding on the plains, dive-bars, playing guitar in front of your pink house's big porch, rain falling on the scarecrow outside of the smalltown - JCM IS the Midwest.

Connecticut = Who's the Boss and general suburban escapism for New Yorkers

Wisconsin = Happy Days (positive), American Movie (Negative)

Seattle = Frasier

The entire country of Canada = Hockey, Maple products, Rush and shivering
 

jestes

Cyburbian
Messages
230
Points
9
Let's just take a look at some of the famous/influential people who have called Mississippi home:

Trent Lott - Senate Majority Leader
Walter Anderson - Artist
Jimmy Buffett - Singer
Jerry Clower - Comedian
Dizzy Dean - Athlete
Bo Diddly - Musician
William Faulkner - Author
Morgan Freeman - Actor
Bobby Gentry - Singer
Faith Hill - Singer
John Lee Hooker - Musician
James Earl Jones - Actor
B.B. King - Musician
Gerald McRaney - Actor
Willie Morris - Author
Hartley Peavey - Peavey Electronics Founder
Bob Pittman - Businessman/Creator of MTV
Elvis Presley - Self Explainatory
Leontyne Price - Opera Singer
Hiram Revels - First African American Senator
LeAnn Rimes - Singer
Richard Truly - Astronaut
Sela Ward (Hubba Hubba!) - Actor
Eudora Welty - Author
Oprah Winfrey
Tennessee Williams - Playwright
Jim Henson - Muppets Creator
And last but certainly not least - Jestes - Almost world famous County Planner.

Also, the last time I checked, Mississippi was ranked fourth in the nation in supercomputer power. Lets not forget about Stennis Space Center where every rocket booster in the Space Shuttle Program has been developed and tested.

The South has quite a bit to be proud of, perhaps we just don't do a good enough job of telling the world about it.
 
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Hi Jestes......I'm your snotty next door neighbor!! :) Just curious, how many of those people on your list STILL reside in Mississippi? :p
 

Zoning Goddess

Cyburbian
Messages
13,853
Points
39
I can't say I get pissed about the southern stereotype, as long as Yankees remember we stereotype them, also: loud, obnoxious, uneducated Archie Bunker types.
Actually, my dad taught me that there are Yankees and then there are Damn Yankees. Damn Yankees being the above-referenced loud obnoxious ones, usually from NJ and NY.
My hometown, Orlando, has its own public image, not so much from t.v. or movies, but from tourists who think it's all theme park-y.
 

Seabishop

Cyburbian
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3,838
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25
Its good to see shout-outs for the South!

An annual study that measures charitable giving always lists the southern states as the most charitable relative to income, and New England as the least charitable. This year Mississippi was most charitable and New Hampshire was least.

I thought it was sad when I read that teenagers in Louisiana aren't saying "ya'll" anymore because people on tv say "you guys." I guess I'm just a Southern sympathizer.

RI's most famous include . . . uh, James Woods, Vinnie Pazienza, and most importantly - John Cafferty and the Beaver Brown Band!
 

jestes

Cyburbian
Messages
230
Points
9
Planderella said:
Hi Jestes......I'm your snotty next door neighbor!! :) Just curious, how many of those people on your list STILL reside in Mississippi? :p

Well, considering that the vast majority of those listed are dead, not many. However, the point is that the South and particularly Mississippi (That is typically listed last in every category that the media thinks matters) is not a vast wasteland devoid of culture and intellect. I typically do not mind the silly stereotypes that people love to attach to the South. However, just like with most Planning issues, sometimes the best way to deal with a lack of knowledge on a particular issue is through education.

The South is actually quite rich in resources and as evidenced by my previous posts has produced a variety of great individuals who have made significant contributions to our culture and society.
 

jestes

Cyburbian
Messages
230
Points
9
Oh yea, I almost forgot Planderalla,

How are things in New Orleans lately? I am in Hattiesburg and used to get down to New Orleans regularly. Also, I think that we (USM) play Tulane next weekend. After our miserable showing against Louisville last night I am sure that ya'll won't have much of a challenge with us.
 
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jestes said:
Oh yea, I almost forgot Planderalla,

How are things in New Orleans lately? I am in Hattiesburg and used to get down to New Orleans regularly. Also, I think that we (USM) play Tulane next weekend. After our miserable showing against Louisville last night I am sure that ya'll won't have much of a challenge with us.
Don't bet on it. Tulane's been kicking some serious boo-tay lately. :)
 

BKM

Cyburbian
Messages
6,464
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29
Its too bad about the accent change. Even though I could never relate to Southern culture, I still hate the loss of interesting regional quirks. Not every local tradition is bad :)

I'm a born-and-bred (and fled) midwesterner, and I'm probably the only one out here in California who finds Drew Carey funny :)
 

NHPlanner

Forums Administrator & Gallery Moderator
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Seabishop said:
This year Mississippi was most charitable and New Hampshire was least.
My least favorite statistic about my home state. Too many "new" rich people that made money and don't want anyone to do anything with it. People up here are skeptical about giving their money to anyone for anything....just look at the mess we have with education funding up here and you get an idea about the fiscal mentality of most in NH....

http://www.eagletribune.com/specials/moneytalks/20000920/NH_002.htm
 

Seabishop

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If someone would just give me loads of money I would be SO charitable with it. The "Live Free or Die" thing has its virtues but does not lend itself well to charity I guess. What's up with those weird state liquor stores too?
 

Repo Man

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2,550
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Milwaukee gets this beer and brats stereotype. While the beer drinking stereotype is reality, this nonsense about people here eating nothing but bratwurst couldn't be any further from reality. We also get the Happy Days/Laverne and Shirley tag too.

I think that Milwaukee has a big time inferiority complex and these stereotypes seem to hurt the image of the City. Anyone who visits here, especially in the summer, would find out that there is a lot more to Milwaukee than beer, brats, and 70s tv shows.
 

Seabishop

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I was surprised to hear people call Milwaukee the most European city in America. That recent muder by all those kids must have really been awful for the city's image. Whenever cities start to get back on track there always seem to be hooligans who ruin everything and keep people in the area from ever going to the city much less live there.
 

Chet

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Seabishop said:
I was surprised to hear people call Milwaukee the most European city in America. That recent muder by all those kids must have really been awful for the city's image. Whenever cities start to get back on track there always seem to be hooligans who ruin everything and keep people in the area from ever going to the city much less live there.
Yeah, that hurt. Part of the Euro-comparison is people and not not necessarily architecture or style. It's a very friendly place.

Back on topic:

"Happy Days" and the early years of "Laverne and Shirley" - yeah that's our image...

"That '70's Show" is based in Wisconsin too. A very "Stevens Point" mid-state flavor.

"Step by Step" was set in Port Washington, WI 30 minutes to Milwaukee's north. Also very blue collar.
 

DA Monkey

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84
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4
Ive never really thought about America having city stereotypes before. I tend to lump you all in the one big basket - you know a little like a kids toybox. A mixture of GI Joes, barbie dolls, cabbage patch kids, monsters, buzz lightyears, yo yo's, matchbox cars, spaceships and leggo blocks.

I dont think I have heard of most of the cities you lot mention, I know of

New York - crowded, cold, brownstone buildings and Jerry Sienfeld

Las vegas - Casinos and CSI

Hollywood - wanna be's, has beens, consumerism and the Beverly Hillbillies

New Orleans - mardi gras

Springfield - The Simpsons

Its funny how you related your cityscapes to tv shows, here we tend to associate cities to cultural/sporting icons and weather (to an extent).

Sydney - raining or bushfires, big city plebs, the harbour bridge and the opera house.
Melbourne - cold, wet, dry, hot, snowing (usually all in one day), aussie rules football, and greeks.
Adelaide - cold, churches, wine and boring,
Perth - warm and sunny, too far away
Darwin - monsoons, damn hot, barramundi, big stubbies of beer
Brisbane - warm, big country town, rugby league
Cairns - warm to hot, best thing to do in cairns - catch a bus to Brisbane.

I dont think its related to the subject but it is interesting to note that in my grandparents day the orientated themselves around towns by using the post office, the firestation, city hall, the masonic temple etc - today my kids refer to mcdonalds, Kentucky chicken, pizza hut, seven-eleven, kmart etc.

It seems consumer icons (such as tv images) have replaced community icons.
 

Seabishop

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powerplan said:

I dont think its related to the subject but it is interesting to note that in my grandparents day the orientated themselves around towns by using the post office, the firestation, city hall, the masonic temple etc - today my kids refer to mcdonalds, Kentucky chicken, pizza hut, seven-eleven, kmart etc.

It seems consumer icons (such as tv images) have replaced community icons.
We're sorry about that .

I have a feeling this sort of thing is going to be like smoking which we exported through movies as an image of coolness. Now that everyone around the world smokes, we've found it unfashionable. When KFC and WalMart undermine local economies around the world we'll probably turn our backs on them and leave the rest of the world to deal with them.

In the US, Australians are always associated with extreme sports and extreme beer drinking in outback pubs - and of course, Men at Work.
 
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Ooh, I thought of some more movie geographies:
Canada - Strange Brew
Alaska - Mystery, Alaska
L.A. - The Player

And to put my two cents into the South discussion:
1. The difference between a Yankee and a Damn Yankee is that the Yankees go home.

2. The face of the South is definitely changing - When I worked in Anderson (SC), I was shocked at the number of people that came to my counter with midwest, jersey and upstate ny accents. I don't think anyone is saying that the South is lacking in cultural contributions, but that in certain parts of rural and remote areas, there is a pervasive sterotype of the McCoy's and Clampetts from Bugs Bunny. And I don't think that anyone would ever state that the South has cornered the market on trailerparks ignorance and racism - it's everywhere - At one time, the Long Island chapter of the KKK had the most members of any chapter in the US.
 

Dan

Dear Leader
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Australian city stereotypes, at least from the impression I get from US popular media. I know reality is much different, but for someone who might not dig a bit deeper, they'll probably think the following:

Sydney: Bronzed surfer, beer-chugging types.
Brisbane: Bronzed surfer, beer-chugging types.
Adelaide: Not much. It's just there.
Melbourne: Stuffy, uptight Victorian city where the pubs close at 9:00 PM.
Perth: Very wealthy, sunny city where everybody is a top-notch sailor.
Alice Springs: Dusty metropolis of rugged Paul Hogan-types and Aborignals. Diggeriedoos constantly moan in the background.
 

Dan

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KMateja said:
2. The face of the South is definitely changing - When I worked in Anderson (SC), I was shocked at the number of people that came to my counter with midwest, jersey and upstate ny accents. I don't think anyone is saying that the South is lacking in cultural contributions, but that in certain parts of rural and remote areas, there is a pervasive sterotype of the McCoy's and Clampetts from Bugs Bunny.
Increasingly, I think of "the South" not so much as a region as an honest-to-goodness ethnic group. There's African-Americans, Italain-Americans, Polish-Americans and Southern-Americans.

Take, for instance, Atlanta. When I stopped there for the night, I checked out the malls, the restaurants, the bookstores of the northern suburbs. I heard very few Southern accents, saw few pick-up trucks, and saw no Dale Earnhardt shrines. The only thing Southern was the landscape; kudzu and billboards.

Here in Orlando, mainstream US culture predominates. However, just as there are ethnic suburban enclaves in other US metros (Armenians in Glendale, California; Poles in Cheektowaga, New York and Parma, Ohio; Chaldeans in Dearborn, MIchigan; etc), there are enclaves of Southern culture; Winter Garden and Clermont. Southern culture? No, not just trailers and Klan meetings, but rather:

* Distincitve music: country and Southern rock.

* Specialized trades: In Buffalo, most builders are Italian, factory workers are Polish, government employees are dominantly Irish, and so on. Here in Orlando, most builders and those working in the building and construction trades are Southern. You don't encounter that many drywallers, pavers, contractors or HVAC technicians with Northern accents.

* Cultural traditions: Southerners are BIG into fishing, hunting, and active outdoors activities (four-wheeling, mudding, etc.). Check out all the trucks in WG with bass or deer stickers in the back window, next to the big "3" stickers. Northerners are more into passive outdoors activities, such as camping and hiking.

* Canada has hockey. Mainstream America has baseball. The South has NASCAR. Southerners have a passion for all things that move with internal combustion engines. Visit a Southern city or enclave, and you'll find far more used car dealers, auto repair shops, vehicle modification shops, and so on, than in similarly sized cities in other areas.
 

Seabishop

Cyburbian
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There are definitely cultural differences, although I know northerners who live up to all those criteria except the accent.
 

prudence

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688
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bturk said:

"Step by Step" was set in Port Washington, WI 30 minutes to Milwaukee's north. Also very blue collar.
My hometown...nothing like the TV show...the culture is dominated by taverns...31 at last count. Not bad for a town of 10,000 people.

It is a beautiful town...at times.





 

sleepy

Cyburbian
Messages
42
Points
2
Dan said:


Increasingly, I think of "the South" not so much as a region as an honest-to-goodness ethnic group. There's African-Americans, Italain-Americans, Polish-Americans and Southern-Americans.
*

*

*

*
* Distincitve music: country and Southern rock.
I find it interesting that when non-southerners use the term "southerner", they only use it in reference to white southerners, ignoring the fact that the south is the cultural home for African-Americans in the US.

I think southerners-black and white-use that term to mean both races.

I have read that one result of the civil rights movement of the 60's was that black southerners were able to finally call themselves southerners. And most African-American southerners have as fierce a regional pride as white southerners.

As a white southerner born in Memphis, I view southern culture as distinctive primarily due to the interplay of white and black culture, in speech, food, music, and literature.

I've always thought that the FUBU rebel flag--the one with the green field, the red cross, and the black stars--was the perfect flag for the South.

Aside from all that----I like the south because of the wonderful gap between appearance and reality--irony perhaps--that creates this crawl space which is fertile stomping grounds for music and literature. I like the south's oral traditions, the warmth of the people, the tolerance for eccentricity.

I also find southerners to be believers in tragedy--fatalists, I guess. All that tends to make southerners not believe in progress--the perfectability of human nature--but to take a more "life is a stage" approach to things, rather than the "life is a plan" approach popular here in the upper Midwest.
 
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Seabishop

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I think the rest of the country's disdain for religion* is what makes people think of southerners as ready to lynch you if you're not a practicing Southern Baptist. I think the Jerry Springer show has set back the South's image like nothing since segregation (ok and maybe Dukes of Hazard).

*unless its Richard Gere style Buddism
 

BKM

Cyburbian
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I really don't think the rest of the country has much "disdain for religion." The midwest, where I come from, is very religious. Even California is full of churches.

Now, the Chattering Classes (Gosh, I love that term and will use it wenever I can, even though I am probably at least partly a member:) ) are more irreligious than average. Richard Gere does not represent a very big segment of the population.

Of course, the rest of the country is not quite so dominated by evangelical protestantism and its more frantic practitioners (boy, a church I went to in high school was pretty wild, though), but there is plenty of ol' time religion in the US. So, this leads to some of the disdain you speak of.
 

sleepy

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42
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2
BKM said:
I really don't think the rest of the country has much "disdain for religion." The midwest, where I come from, is very religious. Even California is full of churches.

Now, the Chattering Classes (Gosh, I love that term and will use it wenever I can, even though I am probably at least partly a member:) ) are more irreligious than average. Richard Gere does not represent a very big segment of the population.

Of course, the rest of the country is not quite so dominated by evangelical protestantism and its more frantic practitioners (boy, a church I went to in high school was pretty wild, though), but there is plenty of ol' time religion in the US. So, this leads to some of the disdain you speak of.
I moved to the upper midwest--southern Minnesota--from the deep south and find this part of the country to be more committedly religious than the South. By that, I mean you are expected to belong to a church and the vast majority of people go.

Also, while many people in the south go to church, I find that where I now live has a much more abiding, religion-saturated "feel" to it than the south. Many southerners are hypocrites when it comes to religion (I don't consider hypocrisy to be particularly bad), but in Minnesota, you get the real thing.

In the South, "sinning" is an accepted part of life. Up here, a really strong sense of social control and propriety precludes a whole lot of sinning.

Also, religious fundamentalism in the south is just an excuse to act hysterical.
 

BKM

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sleepy said:
Also, religious fundamentalism in the south is just an excuse to act hysterical.
Without denying that some people do "feel moved by the spirit," I always wondered about the "gibbering in the aisles" churches. I still remember one church in Chicago I was invited to as a guest "Why, we just dispensed with the sermon that week and talked with the Lord"

But. . .I am somewhat agnostic/deist now, but I have trouble with people who instantly dismiss religion.
 

sleepy

Cyburbian
Messages
42
Points
2
BKM said:


Without denying that some people do "feel moved by the spirit," I always wondered about the "gibbering in the aisles" churches. I still remember one church in Chicago I was invited to as a guest "Why, we just dispensed with the sermon that week and talked with the Lord"

But. . .I am somewhat agnostic/deist now, but I have trouble with people who instantly dismiss religion.
I didn't mean to offend anyone when I said that southern fundamentalism is just an excuse to act hysterical.

First of all, I was being a little bit facetious.

Second, I don't really think "acting hysterical" is necessarily a putdown. I suspect there's something positive there. Don't forget, I live in southern MN, where no one, absolutely no one would ever act hysterical!

BTW--MN is a very nice place!
 

Plan Man

Cyburbian
Messages
125
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6
Love to see how each individual American city gets a stereotype, yet when it comes to Canada - a country that dwarves the US in size - there are only four or five generic stereotypes....
 

Cardinal

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10,080
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34
Plan Man said:
Love to see how each individual American city gets a stereotype, yet when it comes to Canada - a country that dwarves the US in size - there are only four or five generic stereotypes....
Let's see if I can get them all:

1) Nunavut, the First Nations - native people living in igloos up north of Hudson Bay.

2) French Canadians, Quebecois - leftovers from French colonial days who are Canada's version of Alabama rednecks or West Virginia hill people. They live in thier igloos along with their livestock.

3) Nice People - the majority of Canadians living from Ontario westward, i.e., "mostly harmless." They have bigger igloos and build tall buildings from sheets of ice.

4) The Atlantic Coast - Anne of Green Gables. Nice wooden houses and fishing shantys with igloos in the back.

5) New Cubans and New Floridans - they have moved permanently or spend their winters in the warmer climates, but are often wet becuase their igloos keep melting.

Am I close?
 

nerudite

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6,544
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Michael Stumpf said:


2) French Canadians, Quebecois - leftovers from French colonial days who are Canada's version of Alabama rednecks or West Virginia hill people. They live in thier igloos along with their livestock.

3) Nice People - the majority of Canadians living from Ontario westward, i.e., "mostly harmless." They have bigger igloos and build tall buildings from sheets of ice.

4) The Atlantic Coast - Anne of Green Gables. Nice wooden houses and fishing shantys with igloos in the back.

5) New Cubans and New Floridans - they have moved permanently or spend their winters in the warmer climates, but are often wet becuase their igloos keep melting.

Am I close?
Pretty close:

2) French Canadians, Quebecois - leftovers from French colonial days who are Canada's version of Alabama rednecks or West Virginia hill people. They live in thier igloos along with their livestock. Don't forget the cigarette smoke that billows from their igloos.

3) Nice People - the majority of Canadians living from Ontario westward, i.e., "mostly harmless." They have bigger igloos and build tall buildings from sheets of ice. Clarification: this doesn't include Ontario itself. Toward the western provinces, again, smokes billows from their igloos... but it ain't cigarettes.

Not a bad job, though. ;)
 

BKM

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29
sleepy said:


I didn't mean to offend anyone when I said that southern fundamentalism is just an excuse to act hysterical.

I wasn't offended or meaning that you were anti-religious. I was actually thinking about some other people/forums that I participate in. I may be a doubter, but I respect religion and truly held religious beliefs. (Just don't try to impose those beliefs-I hate thecoracy and theocratic leanings)
 

donk

Cyburbian
Messages
6,970
Points
30
Canadian stereotypes
1) Maritimers drunks on poggie eating fried bologna
2) Quebecois - ils fument et mangent du poutine
3) Toronto -'nuff said
4) Ontario -Uptight
5) the Prairies - huh?
6) Alberta - the 51st state
7) BC - San Francisco North, pass the bong
8) The north - cold, really cold, the weather not the people
 
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