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City vs. City #2: Savannah, GA vs. Santa Fe, NM

Savanna or Santa Fe, or...

  • Savanna, GA

    Votes: 16 72.7%
  • Tybee Island

    Votes: 1 4.5%
  • Santa Fe, NM

    Votes: 4 18.2%
  • Taos Pueblo

    Votes: 1 4.5%

  • Total voters
    22

Cardinal

Cyburbian
Messages
10,078
Points
33
Savanna: The world-reknowned layout of old-town with its squares; city market and the warehouse district; 300 years of history; ghosts; wonderful colonial and victorian architecture; great restaurants. Still, many of the squares are run down; crime and decay throughout the central area; history of slavery/racism; disparity between rich and poor.

Santa Fe: Defines the southwest; culturally diverse with strong Native American influence; vibrant arts community; southwest cooking; 400+ years of history, Palace of the Governors/Plaza; Rocky Mountains. Still, sprawling at the edges; a "cow town" despite its cultural assets; a vulnerable economy.

So, Santa Fe or Savanna? Or maybe something else....
 

mike gurnee

Cyburbian
Messages
3,066
Points
30
Too close to call. Love them both. Does Savannah still have the nearby paper mill with that distinctive odor?
 

gkmo62u

Cyburbian
Messages
1,046
Points
23
It certainly does, I think its International Paper. I once played Golf on this crummy goat track of a course on its property--I had to drive my car through a washer in order to exit the property. That cannot be good.
 

El Feo

Cyburbian
Messages
674
Points
19
Smell and all, I'll take Savannah

At least it's not filled with fake cowboys and the more obnoxious variety of California expatriates. Sorry, but I won't even DRIVE through Santa Fe anymore, much less think about staying or living there - which is probably cause for Santa Fe to move up a few notches on everyone else's list.

Taos feels much more "genuine" to me.

I could drive to Tybee Island from Savannah if I needed to see the ocean - I wouldn't live there, though.
 

H

Cyburbian
Messages
2,850
Points
24
I have never been to Santa Fe, but I always vote for the southern city :-D


***actually, my mother was at a conference in Santa Fe two weeks ago and when I visited with her last weekend she went on and on about how wonderful a city it was. :)
 

passdoubt

Cyburbian
Messages
407
Points
13
an excerpt from
"For Those of Us Who Need Such Things"
by Brock Clarke
I was driving through Savannah, Georgia, and discovered that the city was deserted, agreeably so, and so I made some inquiries and one thing led to another and I ended up buying the whole city, cheap.. Of course, the city fathers had to sign off on the deal first. They were suspicious of my motives, and asked: "Are you one of those fellows who buys up abandoned cities, remakes them into sanitized versions of their former, authentic selves, and then sells them off at a huge profit?"

"Oh, no, not me," I said, because I had heard of these men, had read about them in all the major magazines, and it gave me a little bit of revulsion, what they did to perfectly good, deserted cities like Santa Fe, New Mexico, and Monterey, California, and Charleston, South Carolina, the way they hired people from the suburbs and had them move to the city and pretend to be genuine abode-dwelling Pueblo Indians or authentic downtrodden cannery workers or fourth generation Gullah basketweavers. "Not my style at all," I said to the city fathers.

"So why in the world would you want to own a whole city?" they asked.

"It's complicated," I said.

"Try us," they said. It was clear that the city fathers weren't going to finalize the sale of the city until I told them the whole story. So I sighed and told them the whole story: of how my wife had just left me and moved back to upstate New York, where her parents lived, because of certain personality conflicts which had caused us to grow apart after three years of marriage. And one of those personality conflicts that had caused us to grow apart was that I had cheated on her, once, with her best friend, and then lied about it, and my wife happened to be the kind of upstanding person who needed to be able to trust her best friend and her husband, and she was also the kind of upstanding person who hated cheaters and liars. Even so, it was an amicable breakup, so amicable that it became clear that I was losing a wonderful, singular woman who had such extremely high moral standards that, if you were a cheater and a liar, she wouldn't give you one more chance even if you begged her. It pained me to know that I would never find another woman like my wife again, and it also pained me to sit around our house in Jacksonville, Florida, which was so cramped with regret and despair that I couldn't think straight. So I decided to find a bigger place, a place like Savannah, where I could be by myself with my few worldly possessions and contemplate how I had ruined my marriage and how I might someday set things right again.

The city fathers sat there quietly and listened to my story. When I was done, they asked: "You mean you've got yourself a broken heart, don't you?"

"Yes, I suppose so."

"Well goddam, why didn't you just come out and say so," they said, because the city fathers were highly sympathetic toward broken hearts, themselves having been divorced by wonderful women for cheating and lying. We all got teary and agreed how difficult it was to live in the cruel, cruel world, and then we talked about the weather for a few minutes, and then the city fathers stood up, smoothed out their khaki pants, hitched up their belts, signed over the city to me, got into their Lincoln Town Cars, and drove back to their duplex condominiums and their youngish second wives on Tybee Island, just outside the city.

So that was that. I moved my stuff and myself into an enormous pink brick house off Bull Street. For a long time, I simply walked around Savannah and surveyed my new property. Even though it was run-down and mostly abandoned, it was still a very pretty city, with all its lush parks and waving palm trees and sagging wrought iron balconies and that good, rotten salt smell blowing in off the water and all that spooky, dying sunlight filtering through the Spanish moss. Yes, it was a fine Southern city I'd purchased, an excellent place to be by yourself and contemplate your broken heart and store your few worldly possessions.
 

Follow the $$

Cyburbian
Messages
126
Points
6
Savannah

I vote Savannah, probably because I was just there for the first time a couple of weeks ago and was very suitably impressed. We took one of the "Home and Garden" tours of five mansions on Victory Drive. We were informed that this was the first year that "suburban" homes had been included on the tour. The most memorable interior decor was in the mansion where the owners had apparently had two of their pet cats taxiderimied and they were curled up on the hassocks in the living room. :) The town lay-out really is beautiful. For all those who care, Williams Seafood Restaurant burned down a couple of months ago and arson is suspected. A very close friend of ours grew up on Tybee Island. When asked if he would move back there, his response was, "The white/black thing is just too wierd."

Santa Fe is a little too contrived for my tastes. A restaurant I visited there had some really cool lamps that I wanted one of, though. They were clay flower pots filled with a green neon tube shaped like a cactus. Does anyone know where I can buy one? Thanks!
 

Lee Nellis

Cyburbian
Messages
1,371
Points
28
Never been to Savannah. I do not agree that Taos is less contrived than Santa Fe - it is just a few years behind it on the curve, perhaps. Being smaller makes it more tolerable. Santa Fe is like Aspen or Sun Valley, or increasingly even smaller places like Durango or Cody (inappropriate western attire capital of the world). If you can't love it for what it is, you can't love it. Despite all the changes, I still like to stroll the plaza after a dinner by the fountain at India Palace and browse the galleries.

If you want a "real" northern New Mexico town, you have to hang out in Espanola (I sometimes dream about the spapiallas at El Paragua, but Espanola is tough duty) or Las Vegas.

I don't know about Savannah, but the disparity between rich and poor in Santa Fe is about as great as anywhere in the west.
 

BKM

Cyburbian
Messages
6,464
Points
29
Lee Nellis said:
Never been to Savannah. I do not agree that Taos is less contrived than Santa Fe - it is just a few years behind it on the curve, perhaps. Being smaller makes it more tolerable. Santa Fe is like Aspen or Sun Valley, or increasingly even smaller places like Durango or Cody (inappropriate western attire capital of the world). If you can't love it for what it is, you can't love it. Despite all the changes, I still like to stroll the plaza after a dinner by the fountain at India Palace and browse the galleries.

If you want a "real" northern New Mexico town, you have to hang out in Espanola (I sometimes dream about the spapiallas at El Paragua, but Espanola is tough duty) or Las Vegas.

I don't know about Savannah, but the disparity between rich and poor in Santa Fe is about as great as anywhere in the west.

Las Vegas,. New Mexico, is quite a jewel in the rough, isn't it? Boy those counties have Third World levels of poverty, though. Especially Mora County.
 

Suburb Repairman

moderator in moderation
Moderator
Messages
7,317
Points
30
I despise Santa Fe. It's the epitome of a tourist trap and seems very fake.

Give me Savannah any day of the week!
 

dbarch

Cyburbian
Messages
52
Points
4
Like both cities, but my vote has to be Savannah all the way...
My ideal city needs to be on or near a large body of water!
 

Trail Nazi

Cyburbian
Messages
2,779
Points
24
Savannah = crime/gentrification - at least while I was in school there.

Santa Fe - never been there.

Vote = Charleston, SC.
 

H

Cyburbian
Messages
2,850
Points
24
Trail Nazi said:
Savannah = crime/gentrification - at least while I was in school there.
Did you go to SCAD? (did I already ask you that at flaefest?)
 

Queen B

Cyburbian
Messages
3,179
Points
24
Haven't been to Savannah.

I have been to a couple of conferences in Santa Fe. Only stayed in the downtown area, which is wonderful and quaint. Loved visiting but would never want to live there. I need green in my life.
 

Trail Nazi

Cyburbian
Messages
2,779
Points
24
H said:
Did you go to SCAD? (did I already ask you that at flaefest?)
Yes, I did go to school there.

Savannah is a beautiful town but I would not want to live there again.
 

BKM

Cyburbian
Messages
6,464
Points
29
While dry, the climate of Santa Fe, along with the topography (gotta have mountains!) is superior. (Although Savannah does have the coast) As green as it is, I hate dripping humidity more than anything else.
 
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