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Schools: Canada 🇨🇦 Concordia University thread

isaacv

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I'm looking to get an undergraduate degree in planning, and I'm looking at the few options for that in Canada.

I used to live in Montreal, and i love it there so i would like to be there, and i'm aware that Concordia's degree isn't recognised by the CIP. Has anybody done this program, or is anybody currently in it? Do you know if it's a more theoretical or technical approach? It's rather hard to find any information about.

Secondly, does anybody have any information about Ryerson's undergraduate program?
 

JeromeRaymond

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I've graduated with a B.A. in planning from Concordia. The degree is not accredited as you mention, but the program offers a nice amount of practice and theory. The higher level faculty is great with upper level urban planning /design studios (2 years, 12 credits) at the core of the urban planning degree.

You have to put your heart into it and not expect to be taught everything you need before hand. To gain more applicable/technical skills it's important to compensate with either classes (advanced GIS, CAD) or extra curricular activities (helping out a professor in his research, or going to design competitions).

The program is heavy on research, with the honours option giving you the opportunity to do a thesis, and if lucky get published. I went through it and while it's hard and sometimes (read: all the time) very confusing and frustrating (as you are expected to figure things on your own), it is very rewarding.

I am, myself, very interested in urban design. I found that if you work hard you can make important connections between the different classes. Behaviour and the environment and theory of urban form give you great theoretical background, while the urban design studios give you practical experience and know-how. Do a thesis and some competitions and you got all aspect covered for a single area of interest.
The same can be true for urban development (especially international) / economics, as well as transportation. All have specific classes attached with very good professors.

Hope this helps. I can only recommend that you ask to sit in on some of the classes, especially the studio courses, which you will spend most of your time and effort on, if you attend the program.
 

12345678

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Their program is not qualifying for accreditation. Should it be one I totally avoid for my undergrad?
 
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-bump-

Last month - November 2020 - Concordia University (in Montreal) launched its Next-Generation Cities Institute.

In the past, Concordia's planning degrees did not qualify for accreditation and were not recognized by the Canadian Institute of Planners (CIP).

Big, game-changing question:
Would the Next-Generation Cities Institute lead to future Concordia planning degrees qualifying for accreditation and being recognized by the CIP?





(Edited in: link to Concordia's announcement of Next-Generation Cities Institute.)
 
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