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Zoning 🟧 Conditions for coffee house with ancillary alcohol service

Roach_Motel

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Has your city approved any coffee houses (no full kitchen) with alcohol service? If so, could you share your resos for this? I'm curious what type of conditions are set to prevent the use from becoming a bar.

I heard from word of mouth that Starbucks Reserve serves alcohol without a full menu and looking into how those were approved too.
 
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Doohickie

Cyburbian
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4,153
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I would think alcohol would be regulated by the state. I know in Texas it's very, very complicated with different rules for, say, micro-breweries and craft brewery tap rooms. I have a friend who started a craft brewery and he said the regs are crazy complicated.
 

Dan

Dear Leader
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@Roach_Motel, how would the zoning code you're working with treat a coffee house with no full kitchen differently than a bar that doesn't have a full kitchen? What about a restaurant that serves alcohol? What is the public benefit? Just wondering, because a lot of problems with zoning relate to use categories that are too granular, when that granularity really doesn't serve a public purpose or help implement a comp / neighborhood plan.

It seems like older zoning codes, and codes from communities in socially conservative areas, make a bigger deal about alcohol than what's warranted in the real world. I get there's the fear of worst case scenarios, like biker and party bars. Maybe this is a situation where restaurants, coffee houses, etc. are allowed by right in certain zones, but serving alcohol triggers the need for a special use permit.
 

Faust_Motel

Cyburbian
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I work in one of those "no bars" jurisdictions- pretty much just a cover for "no adult entertainment bars" as best I can tell. Everything has enough food these days to get over the threshold that it's "more than a bar." And you're more than welcome to serve "adult brunch" in the eyes of zoning.
 

arcplans

As Featured in "High Times"
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6,791
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@Roach_Motel , why do you hate America? :rofl: Seriously tho.. what makes that use different from say a restaurant? check into see what your state requires for a full bar license and condition appropriately based on license types.
 

bureaucrat#3

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152
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10
We've been pretty lax about alcohol as a secondary product. About 90 percent of our downtown restaurants serve alcohol. We also now have an art studio, bicycle shop, a few hair salons and record store that all have wine and beer licenses. We put a stipulation in every one that at least 50 percent of sales have to come from non-alcohol uses. They self report the numbers back to revenue. Usually, its not an issue, but occasionally we'll have some put exactly 49% alcohol sales for a quarter or two. In about 15 years they've been doing it this way, I don't think its ever become an issue. Adds a little extra revenue to some of the businesses.

Frankly, it was a bigger deal to allow the tobacco shop to allow both liquor sales and in-door smoking. Its also almost impossible to get a new liquor store approved.
 
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