• Ongoing coronavirus / COVID-19 discussion: how is the pandemic affecting your community, workplace, and wellness? 🦠

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Coronavirus and other pandemics

Planit

Cyburbian
Messages
12,532
Points
47
Today Governor Cooper has closed all salons, barbershops, nail salons, gyms, health clubs, and sweepstakes parlors; they must close by 5pm on Wednesday, March 25th.




This weekend, we stayed more or less at home. Yard work on Saturday. Went for a drive yesterday to hit a grocery store for Mrs. P's parents (still no ground beef or eggs). Our friends (a couple & a single) came over Friday night (grilled steaks) & Sunday evening (chicken pie) for shared meals.

I have some mixed feelings about continuing those meet ups. We have a fairly small circle, but 3 of the 5 of us work in the public sector (& still working at different city halls), 1 runs programs at science center (which has cancelled all activities), & Mrs. P is HR at a plant (still operating). Cases are just starting to show up in the county. The Girl stayed on the deck all weekend (it was great weather), but today met her 3 friends probably for the last time until this blows over.
 
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AG74683

Cyburbian
Messages
6,665
Points
32
Today Governor Cooper has closed all salons, barbershops, nail salons, gyms, health clubs, and sweepstakes parlors; they must close by 5pm on Wednesday, March 25th.
My money is on a full stay at home order by 5 pm Wednesday.

I really hope we learn from this. Not only how to be better prepared for something like this, but how to be better people towards one another.
 

michaelskis

Cyburbian
Messages
19,853
Points
47
Public Schools will be closed until May 15th..

My money is on a full stay at home order by 5 pm Wednesday.

I really hope we learn from this. Not only how to be better prepared for something like this, but how to be better people towards one another.
I think you are correct...
 

WSU MUP Student

Cyburbian
Messages
10,117
Points
41
Once this shakes out and things are back to normal, I wonder how this will affect planning and development? Many of our core cities were just starting to experience an uptick in new residents and population growth, while other cities like DC, San Fran, Seattle, NYC, Denver, etc. continue to see demand for housing outstrip supply. Will this result in people thinking twice about wanting to live in relatively crowded cities like NYC or the Bay Area and slow the growth there while exacerbating sprawl in the exurbs and new greenfield development?

What sort of changes in ordinances might this result in? You know, for the sake of public health and welfare...
 

AG74683

Cyburbian
Messages
6,665
Points
32
Well my vestibule idea doesn't seem to be working. People are flat out ignoring my carefully dictated check lists on how to get things done and just barging in trying to open the inner door. They then pitch a fit when they can't get inside.

I've put up huge CLOSED TO THE GENERAL PUBLIC signs now, so maybe they'll get the point, but one more day of this will cause them to lose all paper access to this building.

EDIT* It just happened again. THIS time they read by 5,000 CLOSED signs and decided to read other signs and have sat down to fill out a permit. I feel like I'm herding cats right now.

EDIT 2* Y'all, they are just all piled up in the vestibule like caged rats right now. I'm not sure whether to find this hilarious or sad.
 
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DVD

Cyburbian
Messages
14,354
Points
50
No word on Arizona giving the stay at home order. We like to wait on things like this.

The office is closed to the public except appointments. I'm getting a lot of paperwork done.

1st death in the state is someone who worked at the same city. Granted different department and building, but the city response is still the same. Thank you for working during this hard time.

Spoons. Spoons are what I don't have enough of. I have plenty of forks, but I hate having to go to the giant serving spoons just to eat something.
 

JNA

Cyburbian Plus
Messages
25,306
Points
56
Longest closures are

schools - May 1
libraries until further notice
 

michaelskis

Cyburbian
Messages
19,853
Points
47
Sitting in various meetings regarding this it is fascinating to see how different people react to this and how some are better to adapt to change were as some are indicating that something is not standard operating procedure. Although, I think we have all come to the realization that there is nothing standard about this situation.

For those of you in states with orders to stay in... what all is open? Are liquor stores and day cares still open?
 

Reefe

Cyburbian
Messages
70
Points
4
Singapore has kept their schools open throughout. Here's a message from the Minister of Education, Ong Ye Kung, regarding the question of whether schools are re-opening after their usual March break.
--------------------

School is re-opening tomorrow.

I have received many emails and messages from parents. Some asked why not extend the March holidays, especially given the rising numbers of imported cases and impending border closures. Others, including several students, urged MOE to keep schools open as they would like to go to school.

I have personally replied to many parents and students. Actually, part of the reason for the tougher border measures is to ensure we keep Singapore as safe as possible, so that daily activities, like going to work, eating out and attending school, can go on.

But let me lay out MOE’s thinking on why school will open tomorrow, but with more precautionary measures. There are three key considerations.

First, science. With the virus being around for several months now, there is a body of scientific evidence showing that COVID-19 does not affect the young very much as compared to adults. Parents will be familiar with this concept, as this is the case for other diseases such as chicken pox.

Neither is there evidence to show that the young are vectors or spreaders of the virus. The reverse appears to be the case, where the young get infected by adults at home. This is the advice of Prof Dale Fisher, Group Director of Medicine at NUHS and Chair of the WHO Global Outbreak Alert and Response Network.

Indeed, for the small handful of our students (including those from Institutes of Higher Learning) who were infected, every single one caught it outside of their schools.

In this context, it may not be a bad idea for our children to spend the bulk of their day in school, where lessons and activities are arranged such that they mingle only with their classmates, who are less susceptible to the virus than adults. They will be quite a resilient group. If we close schools, many will not stay home, but may run around in the community and mingle with a lot more people, exposing themselves to more risk.

In that sense, schools remain safe places for children, especially as they seem to be more resilient against the virus.

Second, disruption. Closure of schools will disrupt many lives, especially parents who are both working, with no domestic help, and have limited childcare options. We are particularly concerned about parents who are healthcare workers and providers of essential services.

Keeping our healthcare system strong is paramount in the fight against COVID-19. Our frontline warriors will be much more assured if their children are in school, meaningfully engaged, in a safe and healthy environment.

Third, precautions. Notwithstanding that the young are more resilient to COVID-19, there is no place for complacency. We have consulted our healthcare experts and put in place many significant additional precautionary measures to safeguard the entire system, to maintain the calm situation we enjoyed before the March holidays.

We have implemented a Leave of Absence/Stay Home Notice policy, with the result that come Monday, every student, teacher, staff, canteen stall operator in school would not have gone overseas since the start of the March school holidays. As a further precaution, there will be 100% checks on their travel history at the gates.

Also, students will only spend their time with two groups - their class and their CCA. All other activities that involve mingling have been suspended. With CCA suspended for two weeks, their only social group is their class.

Another significant precaution is that every morning, every student who is not feeling well, be it with a cough or sore throat, and not just fever, will have to be in an isolation room or sent home.
In class, students will sit apart, just like during exams. Teachers and students will continue to upkeep the highest standards of hygiene. There is constant supervision (for the younger students) and reminders for all students to wash their hands properly and regularly, and avoid touching their faces.

Implemented together, these measures will serve as a robust layer of system defence, complementing the natural defence children may already have, to enable school to continue.
 

luckless pedestrian

Super Moderator
Staff member
Moderator
Messages
11,994
Points
46
Well my vestibule idea doesn't seem to be working. People are flat out ignoring my carefully dictated check lists on how to get things done and just barging in trying to open the inner door. They then pitch a fit when they can't get inside.

I've put up huge CLOSED TO THE GENERAL PUBLIC signs now, so maybe they'll get the point, but one more day of this will cause them to lose all paper access to this building.

EDIT* It just happened again. THIS time they read by 5,000 CLOSED signs and decided to read other signs and have sat down to fill out a permit. I feel like I'm herding cats right now.

EDIT 2* Y'all, they are just all piled up in the vestibule like caged rats right now. I'm not sure whether to find this hilarious or sad.
Why didn't they close the whole building down? We have a little lobby space for people that has drop boxes for bills and stuff and that's it.

Their congregating there is missing the point of keeping your distance argh - why are humans at the top of the food chain
 

AG74683

Cyburbian
Messages
6,665
Points
32
Why didn't they close the whole building down? We have a little lobby space for people that has drop boxes for bills and stuff and that's it.

Their congregating there is missing the point of keeping your distance argh - why are humans at the top of the food chain
That's my fault actually. I tried to keep that portion of the building open so people could still fill out permits and drop things off. At least half of the people we deal with on a daily basis don't use the internet (or can't for what ever reason). I was trying to limit the disruption to the process. We don't generally have more than one drop in at a time so I didn't expect it to get crazy so fast. I also thought maybe the word would get out that we were closed, but they just don't listen or can't read (or both).
 

luckless pedestrian

Super Moderator
Staff member
Moderator
Messages
11,994
Points
46
That's my fault actually. I tried to keep that portion of the building open so people could still fill out permits and drop things off. At least half of the people we deal with on a daily basis don't use the internet (or can't for what ever reason). I was trying to limit the disruption to the process. We don't generally have more than one drop in at a time so I didn't expect it to get crazy so fast. I also thought maybe the word would get out that we were closed, but they just don't listen or can't read (or both).
wow, okay, I am sorry - put lots of hand sanitizer out there! yikes
 

Bubba

Cyburbian
Messages
5,101
Points
32
Looks like Georgia will take that step at 5 pm today.
...and not quite. "Medically fragile" ordered to shelter at home, bars and nightclubs closed, no gatherings larger than 10 people. Didn't change much of what was already in place.
 

DVD

Cyburbian
Messages
14,354
Points
50
So this office is open by appointment only, but all it takes to get an appointment is to have something that can't be done over the phone or email. So I get this story from one of our counter workers and of course the lady was standing right at the counter not behind our blue tape that tells you a safe social distance.

Counter: so what's going on
Lady: I don't know, our architect was around someone who had the corona virus and he normally comes in, so he sent me instead.

I will give credit to the counter person. She walked off, put on gloves before touching anything, and told the lady to stand behind the tape before she reviewed the plan. She also went to the supervisor to tell the story. I would not have been as nice.
 

TOFB

Cyburbian
Messages
2,300
Points
27
We got Domino's last night. I picked up as it is only a couple minutes away. Slipped the cashier a twenty for a 15 dollar order. Told him keep it or share it. He immediately put it in the communal tip jar.

Tonight we had a Design Review Board Meeting, largely with GoToMeeting, that included a review of an $18M MF building downtown that was time sensitive. The chair, who owns an interior design business, showed up in person in tears as she had just laid off seven people.

That is why I'm drinking tonight.
 

Dan

Dear Leader
Staff member
Moderator
Messages
18,349
Points
67
On the other hand, it's only because of the Chinese policy allowing wet markets that the virus even came to be; wet markets have been shut down before after outbreaks of diseases, but then the government loosens things back up/looks the other way and here we are.
There's a part of me that thinks after this is over, the nations of this world should unite, and ... I don't know, do something that will convince China to ban wet markets once and for all. Forget cultural relativism, forget the fear of being perceived as racist, forget whataboutisms like "well, what's the difference between someone in China eating an otter and someone in America eating pork?" Ban the wet markets, ban bushmeat markets, ban using threatened and endangered species for peepee pills and other "traditional medicines". If someone is selling bats or pangolins for food or good fortune or whatever, send out the white vans, before they start another pandemic. Enough is enough.

(And, yes, we should eat less pork. However, there's a difference between eating animals that have been domesticated specifically as sources of food for thousands of years, and raised, slaughtered, processed, and sold for food under strictly controlled and strictly regulated conditions, versus bringing home a wild badger for dinner. We're at the top of the food chain. We should know better.)
 

Veloise

Cyburbian
Messages
5,707
Points
30
Michigan went to a stay at home order today at 11:00 a.m.

Besides some walks with the family and a going for the occasional run, we largely haven't left the house in over a week. My wife and oldest went for a drive yesterday to go drop off some Girl Scout Cookies on a friend's porch and I went into the office to work in our Emergency Operations Center last Wednesday and made one final brief stop at Kroger. No other trips to any restaurants or other stores or anything like that.

We're stocked pretty well here but eventually we'll have to head out to go buy some milk and eggs. I may try to do that first thing tomorrow morning.
It takes effect about 90 minutes from now. I could get another Meijer run in -- oh wait, they close at 10 pm these days.
When the emergency alert broadcast came in over my phone, I was out walking. just what one needs in a situation like this: the EMERGENCY ALERT BROADCAST signal.
My NPR station keeps testing theirs...
 

luckless pedestrian

Super Moderator
Staff member
Moderator
Messages
11,994
Points
46
Tonight we had a Design Review Board Meeting, largely with GoToMeeting,...
How did you like using GoToMeeting?

Our city is sticking with Zoom but I thought it was a little clumsy at last night's Council meeting.
 

gtpeach

Cyburbian
Messages
2,019
Points
19
I'm... having a hard time. Our schools are closed for the rest of the year. I'm just facing the reality of working from home for the next month and it's a little overwhelming. We're honestly in really good shape. My boss is really supportive, and I know that I personally have good job security. If our staff gets reduced due to lack of funding, I'll be one of the last to be relieved (and we have six months operating expenses in our reserve fund, so staff lay offs would be the last thing to happen). I was able to go out early on Sunday morning to get about two weeks worth of groceries and even got some toilet paper and paper towels. We're really fine.

And I'm still so anxious. My husband doesn't have insurance. He dragged his feet about signing up on healthcare.gov and missed the open enrollment. Our open enrollment is coming up, but it's going to be VERY expensive to add him. But I'm terrified of not having him covered right now, so we may just have to suck it up.

And of course, those are just the self-facing concerns I have. So many people are going to ruined financially by this, not to mention the physical and death toll. I'm heartbroken.
 
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Doohickie

Cyburbian
Messages
2,460
Points
34
A friend of mine who works for the transit system is experiencing symptoms and has been tested, awaiting results.

Someone at my workplace (a large company with thousands of employees) tested positive. They don't work in the same area of the building as I do and I'm in my second week of telecommuting.
 

Planit

Cyburbian
Messages
12,532
Points
47
I'm with you peach. We should be okay, but I have friends & some family that will not be as fortunate. This is painful and going to get worse before better.

My wife is in HR and she's become the de facto wellness checker at her facility. That is not right and she's working on getting that changed. However in the meantime that's what has to be done. She has a script of 5 questions and if any 1 of those are answered in the affirmative, they can not work. Last night she had to tell 2 workers not to come back to work for a while. One is exhibiting symptoms and was told to go to their doctor, while the other did not exhibit anything but had direct contact with the other. That person was told to get tested or self-isolate for 14 days.

City Hall will be closed to the public starting Wednesday at 5:00 pm (I've been try to do this for years :ha:).
 

Gedunker

Moderating
Staff member
Moderator
Messages
11,300
Points
37
Well, there go the summer Olympics. Canceled for about a year per Prime Minister Abe.
 

Dan

Dear Leader
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Moderator
Messages
18,349
Points
67
And I'm still so anxious. My husband doesn't have insurance. He dragged his feet about signing up on healthcare.gov and missed the open enrollment. Our open enrollment is coming up, but it's going to be VERY expensive to add him. But I'm terrified of not having him covered right now, so we may just have to suck it up.
That's my big fear. I hold the health insurance for me and my wife. It's a great plan, with low co-pays, low deductibles, and they cover a very high percentage of out-of-network costs, with a low annual cap for out-of-pocket expenses. If I get laid off or furloughed, I lose the plan. If I get hired back, I might not be able to get my old plan back, because the group no longer offers it -- I'm grandfathered in. The plan they offer to new hires has higher co-pays, covers a lower percentage of out-of-network costs, and has a much hgher cap for out-of-pocket expenses.
 

mendelman

Unfrozen Caveman Planner
Staff member
Moderator
Messages
13,473
Points
50
My City Hall closed to public as of last night. I'm working on a WFH 50/50 plan for my Dept to implement today.
 

Hink

OH....IO
Staff member
Moderator
Messages
15,446
Points
48
Well, there go the summer Olympics. Canceled for about a year per Prime Minister Abe.
That is the right choice. It is unfair to so many athletes who do not have access to proper training locations. I have friends who have run in the Olympic trials and all my facebook is screaming about is how it was unfair to expect athletes to train under these uncertain circumstances.

One year will allow for a new round of effort, although I feel for those who are at the end of their careers and won't have the same fitness they would have had this year....

The other consideration was that WADA was unable to do a lot of their work with this virus. Olympic years are very important years to make sure all testing is in place, because there are a lot of countries that will cheat to win. A LOT.
 

michaelskis

Cyburbian
Messages
19,853
Points
47
My City Hall closed to public as of last night. I'm working on a WFH 50/50 plan for my Dept to implement today.
We are also looking at personnel resource allocation to keep everyone employed and to make sure we have backups for when folks get sick.
 

Salmissra

Cyburbian
Messages
5,834
Points
29
Hubby and I are both under a County-wide order to stay home/shelter in place. His work team is going to a revolving schedule, so he works 1, off 4, including weekends. They don't think they need permission letters - they aren't essential - but if the County or State goes to full lockdown, then he will be home full time.

I'm in Week 2 of full-time at home preferred. Director said we can go to the office if we need to. I went for a half-day last week and gathered files, so I'm good for another week. My plan is to only leave the house to walk the dog for at least these 5 days. I will go to the store only over the weekend, simply because by then I will need more perishables.

His company started layoffs last week. Mostly those at the hospitality locations they serve, but if this goes into summer, they may start cuts at HQ. I think I'm safe for a few weeks, but I worry that my staff is not.
 

Planit

Cyburbian
Messages
12,532
Points
47
Our city has a limited resources for remote working. I discussed this with my staff and when/if we are told to be at home, the majority of our work can be internet based. If there are files on the server we need to access, planning staff will come into the office for an hour or so, download those files and leave. This frees up the remote access licenses for others (primarily in public works & emergency services). CM has approved this, but both he & I reserve the right to obtain a remote license(s) for the department if required.
 

WSU MUP Student

Cyburbian
Messages
10,117
Points
41
My daughter's 4th grade class has started using Zoom to hold "morning meetings". Today is their first one. I'm working at the counter in the kitchen while she's in the den a few rooms away. It's nice to hear those voices coming over the computer. All the kids seem to be having a lot of fun with the technology.

Yesterday I got a kick out of watching the 3-year-old girl across the street riding around their driveway in a Power Wheels golf cart.

I like to sit by the window in the kitchen to work and I've also noticed more teenagers out on walks with their parents than I ever have seen before.
 

Planit

Cyburbian
Messages
12,532
Points
47
There's a group of middle schoolers from the neighborhood hanging out at the park next door everyday since school has closed.

Our deck has a good vantage point. There's some very interesting conversations overheard.
 

SlaveToTheGrind

Cyburbian
Messages
1,375
Points
25
Local school district announced yesterday that schools will remain closed until May 1. I suspect it will be extended to the end of the school year. A little disappointed as I have a senior that may not get to participate in the whole graduation pomp and circumstance.
 

Bubba

Cyburbian
Messages
5,101
Points
32
There's a part of me that thinks after this is over, the nations of this world should unite, and ... I don't know, do something that will convince China to ban wet markets once and for all. Forget cultural relativism, forget the fear of being perceived as racist, forget whataboutisms like "well, what's the difference between someone in China eating an otter and someone in America eating pork?" Ban the wet markets, ban bushmeat markets, ban using threatened and endangered species for peepee pills and other "traditional medicines". If someone is selling bats or pangolins for food or good fortune or whatever, send out the white vans, before they start another pandemic. Enough is enough.
Yeah...good luck with that.
 

Hink

OH....IO
Staff member
Moderator
Messages
15,446
Points
48
The best outcome of this whole schooling from home through use of the internet thing is that children will never have snow days again. Now schools know what to do to continue to teach kids without the use of the classroom.
Honestly, this could be an interesting outcome from this. Will homeschooling increase?

I think it would make sense to provide more flexibility to parents with school as well. We take our kids out of school for a week each year to go on vacation. My kids are good, they do their work, they get good grades, and we get looked at oddly every year. What my kids learn at school in some random week in October or November is not creating memories like going to Disney or California, or whatever we take them.

If I take my kids out of school and take them to the Olympics (my wife isn't supporting this, but with an additional year, I can fight for it again), my kids will have an experience that is more important to me than a week of school. The balance is important I believe. I understand that many rules are in place to protect kids against bad parents, but it also makes it hard for good parents to have flexibility to provide additional opportunities for their kids. My school counts those days against my kids. Why?

I think these changes are going to cause some substantial changes to how we have always looked at life. Technological changes are coming sooner than later because of this. It turns out everyone doesn't have to be in an office, kids don't have to be at school 5 days a week, etc. It will be interesting.
 

AG74683

Cyburbian
Messages
6,665
Points
32
Yeah...good luck with that.
Wasn't the point of wet markets and government de-regulation of wild animal harvesting to basically prevent the mass starvation of Chinese people seen under Zedong? It was Xiaoping who lifted the state controls that led to the mass market of formerly banned animals to try and prevent the continued starvation of the country from massive food shortages. It was never intended to develop into large wet markets or commercialization of wild animal harvesting. They did enforce regulations after the SARS outbreak, and I suspect we'll see them temporarily do the same here, but whether it becomes a permanent thing remains to be seen. Even the Chinese can admit something needs to be done at this point. It'll be next to impossible to enforce anything in rural China, but rural Chinese go to markets in the city to sell anyway.

Honestly, this could be an interesting outcome from this. Will homeschooling increase?
Lol no way. Would YOU want to spend the regular school hours with your kids every day until they graduate? Most parents I know are having a meltdown because the kids are driving them up the wall!
 
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Hink

OH....IO
Staff member
Moderator
Messages
15,446
Points
48
Wasn't the point of wet markets and government de-regulation of wild animal harvesting to basically prevent the mass starvation of Chinese people seen under Zedong? It was Xiaoping who lifted the state controls that led to the mass market of formerly banned animals to try and prevent the continued starvation of the country from massive food shortages. It was never intended to develop into large wet markets or commercialization of wild animal harvesting. They did enforce regulations after the SARS outbreak, and I suspect we'll see them temporarily do the same here, but whether it becomes a permanent thing remains to be seen. Even the Chinese can admit something needs to be done at this point. It'll be next to impossible to enforce anything in rural China, but rural Chinese go to markets in the city to sell anyway.



Lol no way. Would YOU want to spend the regular school hours with your kids every day until they graduate? Most parents I know are having a meltdown because the kids are driving them up the wall!
If my office allowed me to work from home 2 days a week, I would pull my kids out for two days a week, if that was an option. To be honest, that kind of flexibility would be amazing in my life. We would travel more. I will say though, that I am not exactly the average case.... so I don't see it becoming a thing. But it would benefit my family. Also, generally I like my kids. Even when they are just trying to piss each other off.... ;)
 

AG74683

Cyburbian
Messages
6,665
Points
32
Well yet another group cannot read the WE ARE CLOSED sign on the damn door and wanted to come in anyway.

I've officially closed off the vestibule and we're going to online only. If they can't do it online, that's too damn bad. I'm of the personal opinion that at this point, building and zoning permits are NOT a concern and people need to stay TF at home. No Karen, you do not need that permit for an addition today, or next week, or next damn month. I'm not sure if you have noticed, but the world is in complete crisis mode now, and your particular needs are not important in the slightest.
 

Big Owl

Cyburbian
Messages
2,559
Points
28
Lol no way. Would YOU want to spend the regular school hours with your kids every day until they graduate? Most parents I know are having a meltdown because the kids are driving them up the wall!
This has shown me that my youngest daughter can do online classes. She craves learning and is self-disciplined. She is able to do most of her work with little parental support. There are some online programs for regular school offered by the state and the local school district. I could see home schooling as a possibility. However, she is missing the social interaction with her peers so, it's not something that she would want to do. Now my oldest... thank god she graduated a couple of years ago because this would be a horrendous experience with her.
 

luckless pedestrian

Super Moderator
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Messages
11,994
Points
46
This has shown me that my youngest daughter can do online classes. She craves learning and is self-disciplined. She is able to do most of her work with little parental support. There are some online programs for regular school offered by the state and the local school district. I could see home schooling as a possibility. However, she is missing the social interaction with her peers so, it's not something that she would want to do. Now my oldest... thank god she graduated a couple of years ago because this would be a horrendous experience with her.
and that's the crux of it - it's different for each kid - my oldest could never have been home schooled but my middle child should have been home schooled and our 3rd could go either way
 

Gedunker

Moderating
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Moderator
Messages
11,300
Points
37
Just received a mailer from the White House and CDC entitled PRESIDENT TRUMP’S CORONAVIRUS GUIDELINES FOR AMERICA. It must be an impostor, because it actually has good advice, and that simply could not have come from Trump.
 

Bubba

Cyburbian
Messages
5,101
Points
32
Just received a mailer from the White House and CDC entitled PRESIDENT TRUMP’S CORONAVIRUS GUIDELINES FOR AMERICA. It must be an impostor, because it actually has good advice, and that simply could not have come from Trump.
Don't know if I've gotten one of those or not - that would involve swimming out to my mailbox...effing rain.
 

dw914er

Cyburbian
Messages
1,397
Points
18
City Hall remains open by appointment only, but we are now instituting a split work week - we will be working 3, 12 hour days (Monday-Saturday) with half staff the first part of the week, and half staff the second part. This should be interesting...
 

Dan

Dear Leader
Staff member
Moderator
Messages
18,349
Points
67
What sort of changes in ordinances might this result in? You know, for the sake of public health and welfare...
Consider the roots of urban planning in the Anglosphere -- sanitary reform. Zoning was an early tool of environmental justice; that lower income people shouldn't have to face the uncertainty of what noxious use might pop up next door. Correlation might not equal causation, but I wonder if the Spanish Flu outbreak of 1918 was a factor in the spread of zoning in the early 1920s.

The infrastructure we depend on for health and safety -- municipal water, sanitary sewers, hospitals and medical services, public safety, and so on -- needs a certain level of density to work effectively.

Scatter too far, and it's well water, septic tanks, the risk of contaminated groundwater, and no critical mass to support health services. Also, we'd be dealing with the environmental and financial effects of increased energy consumption and farmland conversion.

Scatter just far enough, and the cost of infrastructure gets even higher, thanks to the need to build and maintain longer water, sewer, and wired utility lines.

Before NYC became the epicenter for COVID-19, there was the state's first large cluster in suburban Westchester County.

There's growing evidence that urban living is healthier than some idealized back-to-the-land lifestyle. Lower obesity levels, better access to employment and healthcare, lower per-capita energy/fuel consumption, better sewer and water infrastructure, and a critical mass of talent that fosters scientific innovation. Turning back the clock to the 1970s-style urbanism, or buying a set of Foxfire books and heading off to an Appalachian hollow, isn't going to help.

Consider cholera outbreaks were common in the late 1800s, thanks to polluted drinking water and poor sanitation. We fixed that. What are the sources of so many flu strains, ebola, and COVID-19? Unsanitary animal handling and food preparation, and animal-human contact that shouldn't happen. Fix that.
 
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