• Ongoing coronavirus / COVID-19 discussion: how is the pandemic affecting your community, workplace, and wellness? 🦠

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Coronavirus and other pandemics

Bubba

Cyburbian
Messages
5,390
Points
37
We should find out today what Ohio is doing... the rumor mill says they will let the kids play.... we shall see (maybe).
Georgia is moving ahead with playing the season. One side effect of some of the states canceling/delaying their seasons is my high school alma mater had a 5-star senior qb transfer in from a California high school - the kid is a Southern Cal commit. He'll probably break every single school record for passing.
 

ChairmanMeow

Cyburbian
Messages
221
Points
8
The s.o. and I went to rural VA the second weekend in August and there were more people there complying with mask regs than where I live in the NY metro. Idk how to feel about this. VA is still on NY's 'bad state' list so I've been self isolating since then and my only real live human contact has been with the person at Target who put the drive up order in my backseat, and the pharmacist at the CVS drive thru. Also had toe surgery the Wed before I left, so no outside walks or anything for me. I feel... withdrawn?
 
Messages
2,475
Points
21
VA is still on NY's 'bad state' list so I've been self isolating since then...
Thank you so, so much for self-isolating in Metro NY after being in Virginia. You're making a much bigger positive difference than you may ever know.

This year I've been mostly self-isolated in my house in the Queens Borough of NYC. I acquired an early case of Covid-19 at the end of last January, while in a hospital for emergency eye surgery. The hospital sent me home to self-quarantine because the facility was about to become very crowded and I didn't need a ventilator.

My house quarantine was, for lack of better terminology, "on the honor system". At first, I had to check in with the hospital a few times a day. The hospital deemed my Covid-19 case to be severe, but never fatal. My full recovery at home has taken months and months.

Covid-19 has left me with sundry disabilities. They are improving over time, but even with much physical therapy, they are not leaving so soon.

Yet I am considered to be "one of the lucky ones" in Queens. Last spring, news of Queens deaths from Covid-19 was a continual stream. I have lost a few hundred friends and acquaintances, mostly older or with pre-existing conditions. Going to socially-distanced funerals in a mask & latex gloves has become a regular thing for me.

With this context, ChairmanMeow, maybe you can see how very much your sacrifices are appreciated. By doing the right thing, you temporarily end up with a "withdrawn" feeling. That feeling will be over soon, I promise.
 

gtpeach

Cyburbian
Messages
2,100
Points
21
The s.o. and I went to rural VA the second weekend in August and there were more people there complying with mask regs than where I live in the NY metro. Idk how to feel about this. VA is still on NY's 'bad state' list so I've been self isolating since then and my only real live human contact has been with the person at Target who put the drive up order in my backseat, and the pharmacist at the CVS drive thru. Also had toe surgery the Wed before I left, so no outside walks or anything for me. I feel... withdrawn?
It really depends on where you are in VA as to what attitude you'll get. I'm in a county outside of the urban center of Charlottesville. Charlottesville and its surrounding county have enacted very strict mask orders beyond what the governor is requiring. I'm in one of the next counties over and the local Facebook pages are full of people complaining about wearing masks and going to businesses where they have to wear masks, etc. For that reason, I'm not going into any businesses outside of the areas with the strict mask orders. I've been doing weekly grocery pick up, and while I do want to get my hair cut at some point, I'll drive the extra distance to do it in Charlottesville versus risking it somewhere more local.

The county I live in has around 15,000 residents, and we've seen the cases grow exponentially in the last couple of weeks. I'm sure that with college students coming back to campus, we're likely to see an uptick in the urban area as well, but at least businesses are taking precautions more seriously there.
 

Planit

Cyburbian
Messages
13,131
Points
54
Let's do some simple math today:

165,000(ish) deaths
divide by 5 months = 33,000 deaths per month
divide by 30 days = 1,100 deaths per day

Lets say the average airline holds about 200 people.
divided 1,100 by 200 and you get 5.5 ... so roughly 5.5 planeloads of people crash each day. Now that would be newsworthy wouldn't it?
 

MD Planner

Cyburbian
Messages
2,491
Points
37
But the math isn't that simple. At this point we have NO idea what are accurate numbers. I'm by no means a conspiracy theorist but there are way too many examples of deaths being attributed to COVID that either definitely were not or probably weren't. Hospitals are told to inflate their numbers to get more funding. That's a reality and numbers get padded and the system gamed all the time. In any endeavor where the federal government is throwing money around. This entire thing is a complete shitshow. I don't listen to any of it anymore. I take my precautions without being nuts about it and go about my life. I personally know three people who went to get tested at a mobile site, the line was ridiculously long so they left. Then a few days later each received a phone call telling them they tested positive. Those occurred at different sites on different days. So I refuse to trust anything when it comes to the numbers anymore.
 

Hink

OH....IO
Staff member
Moderator
Messages
15,825
Points
52
But the math isn't that simple. At this point we have NO idea what are accurate numbers. I'm by no means a conspiracy theorist but there are way too many examples of deaths being attributed to COVID that either definitely were not or probably weren't. Hospitals are told to inflate their numbers to get more funding. That's a reality and numbers get padded and the system gamed all the time. In any endeavor where the federal government is throwing money around. This entire thing is a complete shitshow. I don't listen to any of it anymore. I take my precautions without being nuts about it and go about my life. I personally know three people who went to get tested at a mobile site, the line was ridiculously long so they left. Then a few days later each received a phone call telling them they tested positive. Those occurred at different sites on different days. So I refuse to trust anything when it comes to the numbers anymore.
I mean come on. The math isn't simple mainly because our government has royally screwed this over. They are trying as hard as they possibly can to make this look like it isn't a thing. They are not trying to count all the cases, and are using the CDC to blanket the numbers.

I am not aware of any hospitals, or doctors since that seems to be the insinuation, that are interested in lying about whether something was covid or not. The numbers are not being inflated due to a want for more funding. At least not that I have seen actual data supporting. Also, the funding that is available isn't given based on what someone died from. It is due to what someone is is classified as having. So why would the death numbers even come into consideration for that conspiracy theory? If hospitals treat someone for covid they get some funding, if they die of covid they get nothing additional. So why lie about the death numbers? If you died from a heart attack, which was brought on by covid symptoms, is that covid or not? If you were diagnosed with covid at the time of death, it counts. Which makes complete sense, when looking at it from a scientific view instead of looking for some conspiracy.

The testing is terrible. The honesty from our reporting agencies is terrible. But this isn't a shitshow because the science isn't clear. This is a shitshow because our leadership has failed us. There is a very clear difference.
 

TOFB

Cyburbian
Messages
2,502
Points
30
Now it's my turn. Woke up yesterday feeling horrible and am getting tested tomorrow. Feel quite better right now but you never know, because it is what it is.

We've been required to work from the office since April 1
 

Gedunker

Moderating
Staff member
Moderator
Messages
11,483
Points
41
Now it's my turn. Woke up yesterday feeling horrible and am getting tested tomorrow. Feel quite better right now but you never know, because it is what it is.

We've been required to work from the office since April 1
I hope you are going to be okay, TOFB.
 

TOFB

Cyburbian
Messages
2,502
Points
30
I tried to eat some week old thai food and thought this tastes, TASTES, terrible. Hopefully a good sign. Feeling better by the hour it seems but just having this thing out there is pretty scary anytime you get sick
 

dw914er

Cyburbian
Messages
1,451
Points
19
I tried to eat some week old thai food and thought this tastes, TASTES, terrible. Hopefully a good sign. Feeling better by the hour it seems but just having this thing out there is pretty scary anytime you get sick
I hope you feel better soon.

One of my code officers was out with symptoms that somewhat matched COVID, and essentially was out for a week while she waited for a test. She ended up being negative, but based on the current timeline for testing, this flu season is going to be awful as those illnesses should be COVID. Perhaps the caution will reduce how how severe the flu is since more people will stay home, but it is definitely a worrisome time to have any illness.
 

TOFB

Cyburbian
Messages
2,502
Points
30
I tried to eat some week old thai food and thought this tastes, TASTES, terrible. Hopefully a good sign. Feeling better by the hour it seems but just having this thing out there is pretty scary anytime you get sick
Had the test this AM. "Brain tickle" is not a bad description.
 

Veloise

Cyburbian
Messages
5,803
Points
32
I tried to eat some week old thai food and thought this tastes, TASTES, terrible. Hopefully a good sign. Feeling better by the hour it seems but just having this thing out there is pretty scary anytime you get sick
Back when the first lists of symptoms came out, I started sniffing products, condiments, foodstuffs. Making coffee, take a deep whiff. Cologne near the sink, yep, still smells like almond. I don't trend towards hypochondria but I live alone, and sometimes Dr Google is my strongest resource.
 

AG74683

Cyburbian
Messages
7,154
Points
40
Back when the first lists of symptoms came out, I started sniffing products, condiments, foodstuffs. Making coffee, take a deep whiff. Cologne near the sink, yep, still smells like almond. I don't trend towards hypochondria but I live alone, and sometimes Dr Google is my strongest resource.
Personally, I've been spraying paint on the inside of my mask. That way, I'll know immediately if my sense of smell has gone away. Now granted, I look a lot like THIS:



But it's worth it.
 
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TOFB

Cyburbian
Messages
2,502
Points
30
Back when the first lists of symptoms came out, I started sniffing products, condiments, foodstuffs. Making coffee, take a deep whiff. Cologne near the sink, yep, still smells like almond. I don't trend towards hypochondria but I live alone, and sometimes Dr Google is my strongest resource.
If you rely on Dr Google too much you will be convinced you are going to die. :ha:

I am still not eating much at all. I can smell and taste fine, not nauseous, just not that interested in food. Lost a bunch of weight and that maybe isn't a bad thing.
 

Veloise

Cyburbian
Messages
5,803
Points
32
Personally, I've been spraying paint on the inside of my mask. That way, I'll know immediately if my sense of smell has gone away. Now granted, I look a lot like THIS:



But it's worth it.
no wonder you're single!! j/k ;):D:po_O:woozy:
 

TOFB

Cyburbian
Messages
2,502
Points
30
Back when the first lists of symptoms came out, I started sniffing products, condiments, foodstuffs. Making coffee, take a deep whiff. Cologne near the sink, yep, still smells like almond. I don't trend towards hypochondria but I live alone, and sometimes Dr Google is my strongest resource.
In Champaign, we had a local weirdo everyone called "The Sniffer" who would come to all our gigs, the kid's as well. Sniffed everything.

Musical connection?????
 

WSU MUP Student

Cyburbian
Messages
10,575
Points
46
Covid related: I am not convinced there is going to be an entire NFL season this year, but I'm hopeful. I know it's problematic but I really enjoy plopping down on the couch in the fall and watching football.

I'm in two fantasy leagues. My long-running auction league will likely be done online this year but my work league, which normally drafts at a Buffalo Wild Wings, is considering getting together for a draft. A bunch of us are much more interested in meeting in somebody's backyard or at a park to draft instead of at a restaurant, even if it's at an outdoor patio of a restaurant. I suggested a park near my house that has a nice pavilion we can spread out at, clean bathrooms, and best of all it allows beer! I think I really just like the idea of drinking beer at the park since I first saw that sign a few weeks ago.
 
Messages
2,475
Points
21
>Unfortunate Covid-19 news<

Aug 24, 2020
First Covid-19 reinfection documented in Hong Kong, researchers say
[R]esearchers at the University of Hong Kong sequenced the virus from the [33-y.o. male] patient’s two infections and found that they did not match, indicating the second infection was not tied to the first. There was a difference of 24 nucleotides — the “letters” that make up the virus’ RNA — between the two infections.
But based on what happens with other coronaviruses, experts knew that immunity to SARS-CoV-2 would not last forever. People generally become susceptible again to the coronaviruses that cause the common cold after a year or even less, while protection against SARS-1 and MERS appears to last for a few years.
________________________________________

Aug 26, 2020
WHO says it’s rare, but possible, that people who have recovered from the coronavirus can get it again
 

michaelskis

Cyburbian
Messages
20,157
Points
51
A friend of mine got an experimental Covid vaccination last week. He said he was "sweaty the night of and tired the next day. Fine now."
A coworker also got a version of it. His response was not quite the same....
orc-Lord-of-the-Rings-The-Two.jpg

In all seriousness though, several local universities that opened at the beginning of the month to in-person classes are now going fully online and kicking the students out of the dorms. Telling college kids to social distance is a bit like telling them not to drink alcohol, have sex, stay up too late, or eat healthy. Some will follow that advice, but they will be few and far between.
 

Doohickie

Cyburbian
Messages
2,924
Points
40
Tell me about it. We live just a few miles from TCU and students are back on campus. Lots of partying. Our numbers are looking amazing right now, best in months, but I don't expect them to last between TCU and Labor Day.
 

gtpeach

Cyburbian
Messages
2,100
Points
21
I have a medical procedure tomorrow to (finally) deal with my kidney stone and be on way to getting rid of this incredibly uncomfortable stent that I've had for three months! The surgical center is half an hour away from my house. I can't drive myself, so CCG is driving me. Due to COVID, he cannot wait in the waiting room. I am expected to be there for about three hours or so.

The nurse told me that he could "run a quick errand" while he waited. Uhhhh... ? 1. Pandemic. 2. Three hours is kind of longer than what I would consider "quick." 3. We live half an hour away, so him coming back home isn't great in case something happens and he needs to come back sooner.

I looked up some of the free public hot spots in the area, so I think he's just going to go sit in the parking lot at a school or library to get some school work done. I know it's all for safety reasons, it's just really inconvenient.

I'm also a little emotional about the procedure since I had so many complications a couple months ago. I'm in much better shape going into this than I was previously, but it makes me sad to think about the implications for CCG and PeachFuzz if something goes wrong.
 

Doohickie

Cyburbian
Messages
2,924
Points
40
Fort Worth's infection rate is down to 0.79. Very good news.




Of course that will shortly be canceled out by the return of TCU students and Labor Day, but it's nice while it lasts.
 

luckless pedestrian

Super Moderator
Staff member
Moderator
Messages
12,450
Points
54
If it didn't affect me so much, this contact spreadsheet from a wedding in Millinocket in Maine would be fascinating - I hope the wedding was worth it and the marriage lasts as the results are pretty crappy

Yesterday someone on Twitter was talking about some wedding near where I work this weekend, wtf is wrong with people
 

Doohickie

Cyburbian
Messages
2,924
Points
40
My niece is getting married next month in suburban Buffalo. I got the invitation this week. Even if I wanted to go, as a resident of Texas I would need to quarantine for 14 days upon arrival in New York State. I'm quite sure my brother will be offended if I don't attend his daughter's wedding.
 

luckless pedestrian

Super Moderator
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12,450
Points
54
My niece is getting married next month in suburban Buffalo. I got the invitation this week. Even if I wanted to go, as a resident of Texas I would need to quarantine for 14 days upon arrival in New York State. I'm quite sure my brother will be offended if I don't attend his daughter's wedding.
It's truly astounding, seriously
 

Bubba

Cyburbian
Messages
5,390
Points
37
My godson and his younger brother both tested positive for Covid this week (each have exhibited mild symptoms so far); their father should get his test results back today...he reported his exposure to his boss as soon as he found out and was sent home for two weeks (he's a high school teacher). His ex-wife (an elementary school teacher in a different school system), who has also been exposed to the virus by their kids, has yet to report it at work or quarantine...
 

WSU MUP Student

Cyburbian
Messages
10,575
Points
46
I just got an email directing anybody from our department in the office this morning to leave immediately and work from home until further notice because somebody in our department has tested. I've only been in the office once in the past two weeks and only really had contact (a few minutes worth of masked and distanced conversation) with one person so I'm not too worried. The department is also spread across multiple buildings and multiple floors and no word yet on which group the person works in or which floor or which building. Hopefully they share a little bit more information soon though so we can try to gauge who might have been exposed.
 

luckless pedestrian

Super Moderator
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Messages
12,450
Points
54
I just got an email directing anybody from our department in the office this morning to leave immediately and work from home until further notice because somebody in our department has tested. I've only been in the office once in the past two weeks and only really had contact (a few minutes worth of masked and distanced conversation) with one person so I'm not too worried. The department is also spread across multiple buildings and multiple floors and no word yet on which group the person works in or which floor or which building. Hopefully they share a little bit more information soon though so we can try to gauge who might have been exposed.
I am glad they are sending everyone home though - it's the right thing to do
 

Gedunker

Moderating
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Moderator
Messages
11,483
Points
41
Took the kids and headed down to our Walgreen’s and got flu shots. Don’t want to take chances with the COVID-19.
 
Messages
2,475
Points
21
A friend of mine got an experimental Covid vaccination last week. He said he was "sweaty the night of and tired the next day. Fine now."
A coworker also got a version of it. His response was not quite the same....
View attachment 48913
michaelskis
When you say your friend "got a version of it"- do you mean that it was the same experimental vaccine serum as what Dohickie's friend got? (Or from the same organization?)

My awful experience with Covid-19 looked like--or rather, felt like--your picture (View attachment 48913).:eek:
It's kinda scary to think that a vaccine might produce some of the same side-effects as the disease itself!
 
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WSU MUP Student

Cyburbian
Messages
10,575
Points
46
Today's the first day of virtual school in our district. When I was out running this morning I saw a couple families still dragging their kids outside for 1st day photos.

We haven't done the pictures today (but my wife assures us we're going to) but I did keep up my tradition of baking cookies on the first day.

1598888507463.png

Preschool for our 4-year-old doesn't begin until next Wednesday so I guess I should make another batch then!

I just got an email directing anybody from our department in the office this morning to leave immediately and work from home until further notice because somebody in our department has tested. I've only been in the office once in the past two weeks and only really had contact (a few minutes worth of masked and distanced conversation) with one person so I'm not too worried. The department is also spread across multiple buildings and multiple floors and no word yet on which group the person works in or which floor or which building. Hopefully they share a little bit more information soon though so we can try to gauge who might have been exposed.
I was able to find out who it was in the office who tested positive. It was somebody who was in when I was last there but I only saw him sitting at his desk in his office through the glass walls when I walked past. Our offices are in the same section of the building but not too near each other and I never even passed him in the hallway that day so hopefully I'm safe. No contact tracers from the health department has contacted me either so fingers crossed.
 

Doohickie

Cyburbian
Messages
2,924
Points
40
Fort Worth's infection rate is down to 0.79. Very good news.




Of course that will shortly be canceled out by the return of TCU students and Labor Day, but it's nice while it lasts.
Down to 0.73 over the weekend, but hospitalizations are up. Hmmm.
 

Doohickie

Cyburbian
Messages
2,924
Points
40
I read an article that said there may be some level of existing heard immunity based on T-cell reaction to the virus leading to asymptomatic infections. This may be the mechanism in meat processing plants and the slums in India, which have much higher rates of asymptomatic infection than the general population. I guess the theory is in crowded conditions you've been exposed to everyone else's germs, including the coronaviruses that cause the common cold, and some combination of resistance to those also provides resistance to Covid-19.

The article also said that vaccines for pneumonia and polio seem to provide partial immunity to Covid-19.

I'm starting think that we may not develop a highly effective vaccine, but that several combinations of measures (which are found through research that's essentially "trial and error") will result in general population immunity. In other words, we won't eliminate it but will learn to live with it.
 

Maister

Chairman of the bored
Staff member
Moderator
Messages
28,644
Points
71
The dubious decision of many schools to resume in-person instruction will undoubtedly result in a big spike in cases....right before the elections.
 

WSU MUP Student

Cyburbian
Messages
10,575
Points
46
I read an article that said there may be some level of existing heard immunity based on T-cell reaction to the virus leading to asymptomatic infections. This may be the mechanism in meat processing plants and the slums in India, which have much higher rates of asymptomatic infection than the general population. I guess the theory is in crowded conditions you've been exposed to everyone else's germs, including the coronaviruses that cause the common cold, and some combination of resistance to those also provides resistance to Covid-19.
I wonder if that's why there seems to be some evidence that preschoolers in particular have shown some immunity (not like older kids who can contract and spread the disease but don't seem to show symptoms or get as sick). Preschoolers have just begun being exposed to so many different germs so maybe it's sort of like a mix of having recent vaccines and a bit of herd immunity.

The dubious decision of many schools to resume in-person instruction will undoubtedly result in a big spike in cases....right before the elections.
On this side of the state, very few schools seem to be opening for in-person instruction and those that are, are offering an online option (though I have seen some reports that in those districts with a choice, the share of students electing online learning is relatively low). There are a lot of districts, like ours, that are only opening online. We are set to be online only until the end of October at which point the district will reassess the situation.

The district just to the west of ours is similarly sized and started up last week with a mix of online and in-person for elementary and middle school kids, while the HS is still online only. About 75% of the district is learning in-person and 25% are online. I don't want to see a spike in the numbers in that community, but I guess better them being canaries in the coal mines than our district?

There are 3 big Catholic schools about a block from my house: an elementary/middle school, a boys HS, and a girls HS. The girls school and the elementary school are a mix of online and in-person and judging by the amount of traffic that comes and goes every morning and afternoon, I'd guess that 108% of the students are attending in-person. The boys HS isn't even offering an online option, they are 100% in-person, 5 days a week. I believe the girls HS is half days with students broken into a.m. and p.m. cohorts, but the boys school is all day for everybody. This is a school that famously prioritizes athletics and it just feels like putting those kids and families at risk for some performative masculinity.
 

michaelskis

Cyburbian
Messages
20,157
Points
51
The dubious decision of many schools to resume in-person instruction will undoubtedly result in a big spike in cases....right before the elections.
When in doubt I turn to the experts...

I am also currious as to what everyone's thoughts are no their new report regarding death rates and causes:
CDC said:
Table 3 shows the types of health conditions and contributing causes mentioned in conjunction with deaths involving coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). For 6% of the deaths, COVID-19 was the only cause mentioned. For deaths with conditions or causes in addition to COVID-19, on average, there were 2.6 additional conditions or causes per death. The number of deaths with each condition or cause is shown for all deaths and by age groups. For data on comorbidities,
LINK
 

Planit

Cyburbian
Messages
13,131
Points
54
Went to a couple brewery taprooms in the really big City this weekend. In both cases we were met at the door and asked if we knew the rules to enter.

First place: wear face masks except when sitting at your table, here's a squirt of hand sanitizer.
Second Place: temperature taken, wear face masks except when sitting at your table.


I found this refreshing since in our area, face masks seem to be optional ... even though they're mandatory.
 

bureaucrat#3

Member
Messages
56
Points
5
We're in week three of students being back in class at Auburn. Of the university medical clinic put a graphic on social media that there were over 550 confirmed cases with a 40% positive test rate.... then they removed the graphic an hour or two later. Apparently their data is a mess. The local paper was reporting that many students are driving to Georgia for testing so the university and health officials don't know the test results and the students don't get quarantined or classes move fully online.

Right now hospitalizations and icu rates are still somewhat low. Locals are fairly conflicted since they need students for business but also don't trust them to act like adults. It's like having a bunch of drunken vectors but with mom/dad's credit card.
 
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Hink

OH....IO
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Moderator
Messages
15,825
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52
I wonder how much the virus will dampen or change people's plans for the holiday.
Hopefully a lot. Next year we will still have Labor Day, the difference being we will have a vaccine then.

If people could be trusted to follow guidelines, we wouldn't have the problems we do. Large groups of people gathering who likely won't meet the guidelines is a recipe for disaster.
 

luckless pedestrian

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54
Hopefully a lot. Next year we will still have Labor Day, the difference being we will have a vaccine then.

If people could be trusted to follow guidelines, we wouldn't have the problems we do. Large groups of people gathering who likely won't meet the guidelines is a recipe for disaster.
We usually climb a certain mountain on my sunny island but not this year, the trails are too crowded
 
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