• Ongoing coronavirus / COVID-19 discussion: how is the pandemic affecting your community, workplace, and wellness? 🦠

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Coronavirus and other pandemics

Super Amputee Cat

Cyburbian
Messages
2,322
Points
32
We just went into a ten day work-at-home order from our department. Unlike the other earlier order in Mid-March, which was for the whole building and after the state mandated shut down, this one was our own floor only. At least two people on our floor contracted Covid, and possibly exposed it to others on the floor. So the director ordered everyone home today as precaution.

So it's back to sitting at home for the next two weeks using a clunky 9 year old laptop to tap into my 11 year old computer at work via a VPN. The last work at home order lasted more than 3 and half-months. While exciting at first not to have to stagger out of the house every morning at 7:30, it quickly grew tiresome. By April, I was going into work anyway because I simply could not get anything done.

To add to the problem, prolonged, constant and never-ending noise exposure coming from loud pickup trucks, motorcycles, and relentless fireworks have given me moderate to severe PTSD.

If allowed by the director, I will probably go into work anyway next week. Luckily, because the order will encompass this weekend as well as the four-day Thanksgiving weekend, only about 5 days are de facto work days. Still, I am not looking forward to hearing 100s of pick-up trucks and other loud vehicles, barreling up and down the street at all hours, going 60 -100 MPH with decibel levels 50% higher than that.
 

JNA

Cyburbian Plus
Messages
26,025
Points
64
FREEDOM FROM SCIENCE
 

gtpeach

Cyburbian
Messages
2,162
Points
22
We had an interesting presentation in one of our MPO meetings this week by one of the state transportation researchers talking about safety trends. The assumption from all of us was that since there has been less overall traffic due to the pandemic that we would also see reductions in crashes, serious injuries, and fatalities. It turns out, that even with reductions in vehicle miles, all the safety indicators are actually increasing. The reason given is that the risk averse people are staying at home, so the people on the roads are the ones that practice higher risk behavior - not wearing seatbelts, speeding, and driving drunk.

So now, even efforts to look for the silver lining and find potential benefits from COVID are tainted.
 

luckless pedestrian

Super Moderator
Staff member
Moderator
Messages
12,687
Points
54
We had an interesting presentation in one of our MPO meetings this week by one of the state transportation researchers talking about safety trends. The assumption from all of us was that since there has been less overall traffic due to the pandemic that we would also see reductions in crashes, serious injuries, and fatalities. It turns out, that even with reductions in vehicle miles, all the safety indicators are actually increasing. The reason given is that the risk averse people are staying at home, so the people on the roads are the ones that practice higher risk behavior - not wearing seatbelts, speeding, and driving drunk.

So now, even efforts to look for the silver lining and find potential benefits from COVID are tainted.

I also think people are driving faster because there isn't the usual morning traffic that slows speeds - I noticed in my commute across rural highways up here
 

Hink

OH....IO
Staff member
Moderator
Messages
16,055
Points
55

How Iowa's Governor Went From Dismissing Mask Mandates to Ordering One Herself​


Is it just me or are we continuing to see stories like this... where a Republican governor, who didn't want to listen to science, is now trying to at least do something?

I have a feeling that next year when we have a vaccine, and at least some control over the virus, we look back and see a lot of crazy trends. There was a study that mask wearing may not work as well as some people say it does. Maybe we will see it only helped a bit.

BUT AS A LEADER, WHY WOULDN'T YOU WANT EVEN A LITTLE BIT TO HELP PEOPLE? What freedom are we really losing? These people and their hill is crazy. Even if you don't think that the mask works, just wear it. Just hope that it is doing more than the nothing that not wearing a mask is doing.

Lead. Take ownership of the crisis. Make hard choices.
 

Bubba

Cyburbian
Messages
5,537
Points
40
We just went back to optional WFH. There is pretty much nothing I need to do at the office rather than from home. This could go on for months.

Our offices that had reopened on a limited basis will revert to closed starting next week and continue to be closed through at least early January.
 

Hink

OH....IO
Staff member
Moderator
Messages
16,055
Points
55
We going back to WFH until at least December 17th. My guess is that it will be longer...
 

Maister

Chairman of the bored
Staff member
Moderator
Messages
28,954
Points
71
WFH for the next two and a half weeks. It will likely be extended, though.
 

MD Planner

Cyburbian
Messages
2,624
Points
40
We've never closed although we were closed completely to the public for a while and even now have limited public in the building. We've had two employees with the virus but they apparently didn't get it here and didn't give it to anybody here. We do a decent job with air filters, wiping surfaces and keeping appropriate distance most of the time.
 

Salmissra

Cyburbian
Messages
6,080
Points
33
We went WFH in March and in July it was extended through the end of this year. Recently it was extended through first quarter next year, with second quarter a possibility.

Offices are closed to the public, but certain areas are still coming in. Our regional police cadet training facility is open, and has taken over the conference rooms because of the need to spread out. Accounting and payroll come in as needed. But basically it's a ghost town.
 

Veloise

Cyburbian
Messages
5,873
Points
33
We just went into a ten day work-at-home order from our department. Unlike the other earlier order in Mid-March, which was for the whole building and after the state mandated shut down, this one was our own floor only. At least two people on our floor contracted Covid, and possibly exposed it to others on the floor. So the director ordered everyone home today as precaution.

So it's back to sitting at home for the next two weeks using a clunky 9 year old laptop to tap into my 11 year old computer at work via a VPN. The last work at home order lasted more than 3 and half-months. While exciting at first not to have to stagger out of the house every morning at 7:30, it quickly grew tiresome. By April, I was going into work anyway because I simply could not get anything done.

To add to the problem, prolonged, constant and never-ending noise exposure coming from loud pickup trucks, motorcycles, and relentless fireworks have given me moderate to severe PTSD.

If allowed by the director, I will probably go into work anyway next week. Luckily, because the order will encompass this weekend as well as the four-day Thanksgiving weekend, only about 5 days are de facto work days. Still, I am not looking forward to hearing 100s of pick-up trucks and other loud vehicles, barreling up and down the street at all hours, going 60 -100 MPH with decibel levels 50% higher than that.
I don't know where your home base is; do you have any local co-working spaces?

Last weekend I participated filming a commercial for one of ours. It's situated in a long-abandoned DT building that was completely revitalized for ArtPrize a few years back, made an attempt at retail and offices. As it was one of my favorite event venues, I was pleased to see what they've done with the place. They've added a small recording studio, a podcast recording room, open-concept work stations, conference rooms, etc. etc.
 

Veloise

Cyburbian
Messages
5,873
Points
33
We had an interesting presentation in one of our MPO meetings this week by one of the state transportation researchers talking about safety trends. The assumption from all of us was that since there has been less overall traffic due to the pandemic that we would also see reductions in crashes, serious injuries, and fatalities. It turns out, that even with reductions in vehicle miles, all the safety indicators are actually increasing. The reason given is that the risk averse people are staying at home, so the people on the roads are the ones that practice higher risk behavior - not wearing seatbelts, speeding, and driving drunk.

So now, even efforts to look for the silver lining and find potential benefits from COVID are tainted.
Here I routinely travel (drive) along a two-lane residential connector, 25 mph. Rolling hills, double yellow no-passing lines.
Invariably a huge pick-up (think poster child for TruckNutzTM) will zoom around and pass me. Seems to happen every time I'm out.
 

gtpeach

Cyburbian
Messages
2,162
Points
22
Here I routinely travel (drive) along a two-lane residential connector, 25 mph. Rolling hills, double yellow no-passing lines.
Invariably a huge pick-up (think poster child for TruckNutzTM) will zoom around and pass me. Seems to happen every time I'm out.

Is that new (or increased) since the pandemic started?
 

WSU MUP Student

Cyburbian
Messages
10,744
Points
49
Our office building has been closed to the public since March. We were at complete WFH for the first couple of months (except for people who needed to be in for certain technology they couldn't access from home) and then in June our department head asked us to start slowly coming in with each person coming to the office at least 2x a month and to make sure there was at least 1 person in the office for each section each day. He's taken off those requirements so right now you only need to come in if you need access to those tech systems. Otherwise, if you want to come in, we have a matrix we can check the evening before or morning of to make sure there aren't too many people in your section and then you can come in.

I was in the office yesterday and I only saw 4 others from our 60+ person department. Judging by the number of cars in the parking lot though it looked like most of HR was in the building. I think Wednesdays is when they run payroll and I think they need to be there to do that. I'd bet it's more empty today.

I plan to keep coming in every other week. I have a new boss beginning December 7th and I might use that as an excuse to come in once a week, at least until Christmas. I like working from home, but we're all getting on each other's nerves since we never really go anywhere and now that my oldest is back to all-virtual school, it will probably just get worse.
 

Veloise

Cyburbian
Messages
5,873
Points
33
Is that new (or increased) since the pandemic started?
It's quite new. (disclosure: traveling to a new location that became pertinent in August)
Admittedly this is one small data point. On the occasions where I've taken the car to a local spot, I've noticed more speeding. I admit that I've done a few multi-hour highway drives, and haven't noticed any worse behavior than was already present. (There's a reason I call it "the 696 Motor Speedway" between Kensington and I-275)

It's long been my practice to treat a green light as a delayed red (all four directions red for a couple seconds) because I don't want to make the headlines. I've noticed an increase in cross traffic treating a yellow or bright red light as a suggestion.

Let me amend that. Every time I'm on one of our local cross-town freeways, there's someone zipping past at well above the SL. While I'm not a traffic engineer, I can tell what 55 or 60 or 70 looks like. These folks are pushing triple digits.
 
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Doohickie

Cyburbian
Messages
3,109
Points
44
Mayor Betsy Price of Fort Worth and her husband Tom have tested positive for corona, just days after she led a pretty heavily attended bicycle ride (which apparently maybe a superspreader event now). Way to go, Betsy.
 

WSU MUP Student

Cyburbian
Messages
10,744
Points
49
This week I am usually at a big econometrics modeling conference at the University of Michigan. It's being held on Zoom this year (and it's actually working out as a pretty good format for this particular conference). Most of the presenters had pretty basic standard backgrounds if they had a virtual background or they were just sitting in their office.

This morning's presenters are both wearing navy suits and pretty conservative ties and sitting in front of flowery backgrounds with campus buildings behind them and wearing headset microphones. If they had put The Big House behind them, I'd swear they were going for an ESPN College GameDay look.

1605883311693.png1605883352541.png
 

Bubba

Cyburbian
Messages
5,537
Points
40
This morning's presenters are both wearing navy suits and pretty conservative ties and sitting in front of flowery backgrounds with campus buildings behind them and wearing headset microphones. If they had put The Big House behind them, I'd swear they were going for an ESPN College GameDay look.

They're missing Lee Corso wearing the Brutus Buckeye head...

The older brother of a friend of mine tested positive yesterday. Considering that the guy has resided in an assisted living facility for years due to a degenerative nerve disease, I'm surprised he made it this long before contracting the Covids.
 

terraplnr

Cyburbian
Messages
2,393
Points
28
We had an interesting presentation in one of our MPO meetings this week by one of the state transportation researchers talking about safety trends. The assumption from all of us was that since there has been less overall traffic due to the pandemic that we would also see reductions in crashes, serious injuries, and fatalities. It turns out, that even with reductions in vehicle miles, all the safety indicators are actually increasing. The reason given is that the risk averse people are staying at home, so the people on the roads are the ones that practice higher risk behavior - not wearing seatbelts, speeding, and driving drunk.

So now, even efforts to look for the silver lining and find potential benefits from COVID are tainted.

I remember noticing that during the March/April shutdowns . . . there were several weird crashes locally, like people crashing into houses and stuff, even though the roads were clear.



We didn't open back up to the public and it looks like we won't until maybe next spring? Who knows. Our remote work processes seem to have reached a sort of equilibrium, with folks understanding how to hold Zoom hearings/meetings, and electronic plan submittals having worked out the kinks. It's still not as fast as someone coming in to the Counter to ask their questions but it's speedier than it was last spring/early summer.
 

gtpeach

Cyburbian
Messages
2,162
Points
22
I had a splitting headache this morning, but headaches are fairly common for me, so I still went in to work since Mondays are when we have our directors' meetings. Then all of a sudden I started getting queasy. So I very quickly bailed and made the trip home (30 minute drive). I had to stop a few times along the way. It was pretty terrible. I laid down for a few minutes and am feeling better - queasiness is gone and headache is subsiding. But I had so much guilt as I was leaving that it was all because of COVID and I just infected everyone I work with, etc. There is no reason for me to think it was anything other than a really terrible headache, but here we are.

AND I left my phone there, so I'm going to have to drive back tonight or tomorrow to get it. I was in seriously rough shape.
 

Whose Yur Planner

Cyburbian
Messages
11,578
Points
41
I had a splitting headache this morning, but headaches are fairly common for me, so I still went in to work since Mondays are when we have our directors' meetings. Then all of a sudden I started getting queasy. So I very quickly bailed and made the trip home (30 minute drive). I had to stop a few times along the way. It was pretty terrible. I laid down for a few minutes and am feeling better - queasiness is gone and headache is subsiding. But I had so much guilt as I was leaving that it was all because of COVID and I just infected everyone I work with, etc. There is no reason for me to think it was anything other than a really terrible headache, but here we are.

AND I left my phone there, so I'm going to have to drive back tonight or tomorrow to get it. I was in seriously rough shape.
You and the family hang in there. Hope it's nothing.
 

gtpeach

Cyburbian
Messages
2,162
Points
22
You and the family hang in there. Hope it's nothing.

Just to be clear, these headaches aren't actually uncommon. This was a bit on the more extreme side of how bad they are, but still within my normal experience with them.

My point was more about how anxious I am about EVERYTHING these days. Something that has happened to me dozens, if not hundreds, of times before in my life feels extra terrible now.

I have a friend who is just now starting to recover from COVID. She has been in the hospital for over six weeks, was sedated and intubated for several weeks. She has to relearn how to walk, write, breathe, etc. It is terrifying.
 

Whose Yur Planner

Cyburbian
Messages
11,578
Points
41
I should be getting ready to go to the hotel near the airport so I could catch an early flight. Thanks to the virus and people not taking it seriously, I'm staying put. It was the right decision to make, but it still sucks.:mad::cursing:
 

Doohickie

Cyburbian
Messages
3,109
Points
44
From a nurse friend's FB post:
I didn’t think I’d see the day when we had ICU nurses caring for patients on our PCU but that day came and went months ago. They’re full, we’re full, other units are even OVER capacity with hallways beds or cohorting.
It’s not just an issue of # physical beds available but also staffing enough nurses to care for the increased number of patients.
Not sure what to expect next but if you or a family member end up in the hospital ... please be patient with us. We’re trying our best.
 

Veloise

Cyburbian
Messages
5,873
Points
33
Our state's AG:
Screenshot_20201127-094937~2.png

My newest FB friend:
Screenshot_20201127-091603~3.png Screenshot_20201127-091553~4.png Screenshot_20201127-091540~3.png

Thinking that this feel-good story needs more attention, I've spent a few minutes contacting Detroit-area media. Oh, and the AP reporter who interviewed me (about absentee voting) in October.
 
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Doohickie

Cyburbian
Messages
3,109
Points
44
I've seen similar stories on our local Nextdoor, where neighbors who don't know each other have been helping each other out in a pinch. Not famous people though.
 

WSU MUP Student

Cyburbian
Messages
10,744
Points
49
Has anyone seen this movie? It was released in 2011 to mixed reviews, but everyone likes it now. Deadpan accurate in so many ways and the comments are dead-on.


Contagion

I watched that a few years ago and enjoyed it. I generally really like Steven Soderbergh movies and this was no exception. I should give it another watch. It will probably feel quite a bit different in the current climate.
 

gtpeach

Cyburbian
Messages
2,162
Points
22
We were talking about reopening plans for our office in a director's meeting yesterday, and discussed the vaccine briefly. My boss said that he would rather be an early recipient of a vaccine than to have the swab stuck up his nose for testing. :roflmao:

It's interesting what causes anxiety for different people. Granted, I was in the hospital with sepsis and had a lot of scary complications from being treated for that, so when I got my COVID test, it was literally a non-event. But, while uncomfortable, it's nothing that I would even hesitate to think about doing if I needed to for any reason.
 

Veloise

Cyburbian
Messages
5,873
Points
33
We were talking about reopening plans for our office in a director's meeting yesterday, and discussed the vaccine briefly. My boss said that he would rather be an early recipient of a vaccine than to have the swab stuck up his nose for testing. :roflmao:

It's interesting what causes anxiety for different people. Granted, I was in the hospital with sepsis and had a lot of scary complications from being treated for that, so when I got my COVID test, it was literally a non-event. But, while uncomfortable, it's nothing that I would even hesitate to think about doing if I needed to for any reason.
Yesterday in my clinical trial, we did self-administration of the nasal swab. Instructions: insert into nostril so that the cotton part is completely within the nose, swirl it around three times. Repeat, same swab, for other nostril.
No brain tickling. I didn't even sneeze.
 

WSU MUP Student

Cyburbian
Messages
10,744
Points
49
As a dumb high schooler who would do dumb things for dumb laughs, I used to do a dumb trick where I'd put a piece of dental floss far enough up my nose that I could then reach into my mouth and pull it out that way and sort of floss my nostril! Maybe that's prepared me well for getting a nasal swab without much discomfort... :thinking:
 

luckless pedestrian

Super Moderator
Staff member
Moderator
Messages
12,687
Points
54
As a dumb high schooler who would do dumb things for dumb laughs, I used to do a dumb trick where I'd put a piece of dental floss far enough up my nose that I could then reach into my mouth and pull it out that way and sort of floss my nostril! Maybe that's prepared me well for getting a nasal swab without much discomfort... :thinking:

this is the post of the day for the reason that it has left me speechless
 

Veloise

Cyburbian
Messages
5,873
Points
33
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