• Ongoing coronavirus / COVID-19 discussion: how is the pandemic affecting your community, workplace, and wellness? 🦠

    Working from home? So are we. Come join us! Cyburbia is a friendly big tent, where we share our experiences and thoughts about urban planning practice, planning adjacent topics, and whatever else comes to mind. No ads, no spam, no social distancing.

Health 🏥 Coronavirus and other pandemics

WSU MUP Student

Cyburbian
Messages
10,855
Points
50
My run this morning had me go right past the CVS in our downtown. I saw that they had taken over the empty storefront next door to them, cleared it out, and set up a bunch of cubicles and cots in there for giving vaccines and monitoring the recipients for a few minutes afterwards. Even though I see all the news about how slow the rollout has been, that does seem like a tangible sign that things are actually moving along.
 

Super Amputee Cat

Cyburbian
Messages
2,388
Points
32
It was a year ago today that the very first Covid-19 death was reported. Here are some screenshots from the Wikipedia Page for The Covid-19 Pandemic on January 11, 2020.

Covid19-Wikipedia 2020-01-11 World.jpg



Covid19-Wikipedia 2020-01-11a World.jpg
 

Gedunker

Moderating
Staff member
Moderator
Messages
11,681
Points
44
I'm old school and I file electronically. (I use TaxAct.) But I don't get DD, I prefer the actual check. Which makes me old school.:trex:
 

michaelskis

Cyburbian
Messages
20,440
Points
53
Well, I was 100% in support of the vaccine until 10 minutes ago when my wife said that she was on her way down to the Emergency Department because she had a reaction to the 1st shot. When she get's out, I need to go pick her up.
 

kms

Cyburbian
Messages
6,717
Points
43
Well, I was 100% in support of the vaccine until 10 minutes ago when my wife said that she was on her way down to the Emergency Department because she had a reaction to the 1st shot. When she get's out, I need to go pick her up.
I hope she's ok.
 

luckless pedestrian

Super Moderator
Staff member
Moderator
Messages
12,916
Points
54
Well, I was 100% in support of the vaccine until 10 minutes ago when my wife said that she was on her way down to the Emergency Department because she had a reaction to the 1st shot. When she get's out, I need to go pick her up.

omg I hope she's okay and report in when you can
 

MD Planner

Cyburbian
Messages
2,758
Points
43
I know a couple in Georgia who both have it. The husband has been hospitalized for over a week and yesterday the doctors told his wife his survival is 50/50. He's only 51 with no underlying conditions that anyone is aware of. That's absolutely terrifying.
 

terraplnr

Cyburbian
Messages
2,412
Points
28
My mom is a hospice nurse (10 months left to retirement) and they weren't discharging COVID patients to hospice for quite a while but now there are so many, she's been working the COVID patients this winter. She got the vaccine but then a week later got COVID - I was worried but fortunately she got a mild case and is now testing again to see if she is negative. I was especially worried that my dad would get it because he has some pre-existing conditions and is going to be starting localized radiation for prostate cancer later this month, but he has been fine, thank God! One little virus can have such a devastating, cascading effect.
 

michaelskis

Cyburbian
Messages
20,440
Points
53
omg I hope she's okay and report in when you can
Hope she's ok
They gave her something to address the reaction and sent her home. She called me when she got home and went right to bed. If the reaction comes back, they said that they will need to admit her into the hospital, which is an issue because they are already at 115% of capacity. I spoke with her coworker that rode home with her (lives a block over from us), and she is positive they would have admitted my wife if they were not over capacity. My oldest is going to keep an eye on her and check in on her every 30 minutes or so while I am at work.
 

Maister

Chairman of the bored
Staff member
Moderator
Messages
29,287
Points
72
They gave her something to address the reaction and sent her home. She called me when she got home and went right to bed. If the reaction comes back, they said that they will need to admit her into the hospital, which is an issue because they are already at 115% of capacity. I spoke with her coworker that rode home with her (lives a block over from us), and she is positive they would have admitted my wife if they were not over capacity. My oldest is going to keep an eye on her and check in on her every 30 minutes or so while I am at work.
I trust the reaction was not very severe. There have been a handful of cases where anaphylaxis was reported following the vaccine, but we're talking about 11 per million doses administered (or 0.001%)
 

Salmissra

Cyburbian
Messages
6,154
Points
34
^^And there are different versions of the vaccine, so a reaction to one doesn't equal a reaction to the other. Which version did she get? Was this the first or second shot?

And more versions are coming. There will be several options by the time those of us deemed low risk/expendable get to the front of the line. I am staying in line and will get mine when I can.
 

michaelskis

Cyburbian
Messages
20,440
Points
53
I trust the reaction was not very severe. There have been a handful of cases where anaphylaxis was reported following the vaccine, but we're talking about 11 per million doses administered (or 0.001%)
^^And there are different versions of the vaccine, so a reaction to one doesn't equal a reaction to the other. Which version did she get? Was this the first or second shot?

And more versions are coming. There will be several options by the time those of us deemed low risk/expendable get to the front of the line. I am staying in line and will get mine when I can.
The reaction at first had the markings of being severe but it reacted quickly to what ever they gave her and it does not look like it is getting any worse. However, the Bell's Palsy like symptoms continue. The doctors indicated that there are super rare cases of this happening, and they have no idea how long it will last, but they won't be alarmed unless it continues for 8 to 12 weeks. She has no history of it, so the Doctors and everyone are baffled as to why she would have this type of reaction.

I was not trilled, but she decided to go to work today anyways because they are short staffed and over capacity. She said they gave her high dosage prednisone and an anti-virial. If she does have another reaction, it is a 2 minute walk to the Emergency Department.

She got the Pfizer version and she is going to need to do a full screening with the neurologist before shot #2.
 

Whose Yur Planner

Cyburbian
Messages
11,720
Points
43
My mom is a hospice nurse (10 months left to retirement) and they weren't discharging COVID patients to hospice for quite a while but now there are so many, she's been working the COVID patients this winter. She got the vaccine but then a week later got COVID - I was worried but fortunately she got a mild case and is now testing again to see if she is negative. I was especially worried that my dad would get it because he has some pre-existing conditions and is going to be starting localized radiation for prostate cancer later this month, but he has been fine, thank God! One little virus can have such a devastating, cascading effect.
Sorry to hear about your dad but glad your mom had mild case
 

WSU MUP Student

Cyburbian
Messages
10,855
Points
50
A friend of mine did a mini road trip to do curbside pickup from a newish brewery over on @Maister's side of the state this past weekend and stopped by my house yesterday evening to drop off a couple 4-packs.

It was chilly outside but I dragged a couple chairs over to the driveway so we could sit outside and have some socially-distanced beers together. That was my first time seeing a friend in person since all this began.... possibly my first time in over a year since I cannot recall if I went out to do anything in January - March of 2020.
 

kjel

Super Moderator
Staff member
Moderator
Messages
12,562
Points
43
NJ has rolled out Phase 1A & 1B, Phase 1C should start very soon which is my cohort. The county may end up vaccinating employees with risk factors. Until then, mask up and stay distant. The state is also reporting # of vaccine doses administered on the COVID dashboard.
 
Last edited:

Dan

Dear Leader
Staff member
Moderator
Messages
19,097
Points
70
NJ has rolled out Phase 1A & 1B, Phase 1C should start very soon which is my cohort. The county may end up vaccinating employees with risk factors. Until then, mask up and stay distant. The state is also reporting # of vaccine doses administered on the COVID dashboard.
I'm waiting for 1C -- comorbid of moderate asthma. (Never had an attack, but I carry an inhaler just in case.) I've been working at the office lately, because of all the painting and spackling going on at home, so I feel a bit more vulnerable. (My home office is filled with stuff from the rest of the house for now. I've also been using ArcMap a bit more lately, which isn't installed on anything at home.)

I feel lucky that my workplace is in a busy little downtown. Lately, though, almost all the restaurants downtown are closed for the month, along with many stores and bars. When I step out of the office for lunch, there's hardly anybody out. At least two of my favorite carryout places to get a quick lunch are still open -- what I call "chicken lo mein guy" and "hot dog guy".
 

Maister

Chairman of the bored
Staff member
Moderator
Messages
29,287
Points
72
Do they move you up the vaccine list if you have multiple risk factors?
 

michaelskis

Cyburbian
Messages
20,440
Points
53
The reaction at first had the markings of being severe but it reacted quickly to what ever they gave her and it does not look like it is getting any worse. However, the Bell's Palsy like symptoms continue. The doctors indicated that there are super rare cases of this happening, and they have no idea how long it will last, but they won't be alarmed unless it continues for 8 to 12 weeks. She has no history of it, so the Doctors and everyone are baffled as to why she would have this type of reaction.

I was not trilled, but she decided to go to work today anyways because they are short staffed and over capacity. She said they gave her high dosage prednisone and an anti-virial. If she does have another reaction, it is a 2 minute walk to the Emergency Department.

She got the Pfizer version and she is going to need to do a full screening with the neurologist before shot #2.

Things got worse and she is unable to work today. Instead she is going to the neurologist.
 

Whose Yur Planner

Cyburbian
Messages
11,720
Points
43
I'm waiting for 1C -- comorbid of moderate asthma. (Never had an attack, but I carry an inhaler just in case.) I've been working at the office lately, because of all the painting and spackling going on at home, so I feel a bit more vulnerable. (My home office is filled with stuff from the rest of the house for now. I've also been using ArcMap a bit more lately, which isn't installed on anything at home.)


I've heard it both ways. Either asthma makes you more prone to it or less.
 

MD Planner

Cyburbian
Messages
2,758
Points
43
I am back to work today after being out with COVID. I was very fortunate, had aches and sweats and chills (without a fever) for a day and a half. But that was it. So I didn't think that much of it. Then two days after that ended I realized I had no sense of smell. That's when I got tested. But other than being a bit more tired than usual I'm feeling just fine. I know results may vary and I know I was one of the luckier ones. Even my sense of smell is already returning. It's just crazy how it impacts people so differently.
 

kms

Cyburbian
Messages
6,717
Points
43
I am back to work today after being out with COVID. I was very fortunate, had aches and sweats and chills (without a fever) for a day and a half. But that was it. So I didn't think that much of it. Then two days after that ended I realized I had no sense of smell. That's when I got tested. But other than being a bit more tired than usual I'm feeling just fine. I know results may vary and I know I was one of the luckier ones. Even my sense of smell is already returning. It's just crazy how it impacts people so differently.
I'm glad you had what looks like a mild case. Take it easy and feel better.
 

Salmissra

Cyburbian
Messages
6,154
Points
34
My dad tested positive yesterday. His only symptom was an irregular heartbeat. Since he's already on a pacemaker, the cardiologist's office had contacted him to set up a time to come in and test his pacemaker. He had the test in the office because that's SOP.

On the other side of the parental unit, my mother had her first vaccine shot Tuesday. No issues, was in and out seamlessly, and has her appointment for the 2nd shot.
 

michaelskis

Cyburbian
Messages
20,440
Points
53
Went to the neurologist, and they said there is nothing they can do. She has no control of muscles on the left side of her face at the moment and the Dr refuses to acknowledge that it might be related to the vaccine... she has to go back next Wednesday to see if there is any change.
 

luckless pedestrian

Super Moderator
Staff member
Moderator
Messages
12,916
Points
54
Went to the neurologist, and they said there is nothing they can do. She has no control of muscles on the left side of her face at the moment and the Dr refuses to acknowledge that it might be related to the vaccine... she has to go back next Wednesday to see if there is any change.

oh no I am so sorry
 

kms

Cyburbian
Messages
6,717
Points
43
Went to the neurologist, and they said there is nothing they can do. She has no control of muscles on the left side of her face at the moment and the Dr refuses to acknowledge that it might be related to the vaccine... she has to go back next Wednesday to see if there is any change.
Oh no. I'll say a prayer for her.
 

RandomPlanner

Cyburbian
Messages
1,806
Points
26
Went to the neurologist, and they said there is nothing they can do. She has no control of muscles on the left side of her face at the moment and the Dr refuses to acknowledge that it might be related to the vaccine... she has to go back next Wednesday to see if there is any change.
This is a problem! I'm not an alarmist or a conspiracy nut but if people are having reactions and doctors are refusing to link them to the vaccine, I can't help but be concerned!

Also, I'm so sorry to hear about your wife's reaction. Do they have any idea how long it might last?
 

MD Planner

Cyburbian
Messages
2,758
Points
43
I'm sorry your wife is going through this Mskis. Thankfully almost all folks think that will be a temporary reaction with no permanent issues. Interesting that the doctor refuses to link it to the vaccine. I read several weeks ago that Bell's Palsy was a reaction in a few people. I've had friends and relatives who have experienced that. It does go away in time. Hang in there.
 

gtpeach

Cyburbian
Messages
2,227
Points
23
That's really scary. I mean, I know reactions are still uncommon and even though I'm nervous about it, I'm planning to get vaccinated whenever it becomes available for me. But from everything I heard, this shouldn't really be that much different than other vaccines people get regularly with little reaction, so it does make you wonder what's happening, or how different the amount/level of side effects/reactions are from other vaccines and maybe we just don't hear about them as much anymore?
 

WSU MUP Student

Cyburbian
Messages
10,855
Points
50
This is a problem! I'm not an alarmist or a conspiracy nut but if people are having reactions and doctors are refusing to link them to the vaccine, I can't help but be concerned!

The doctor might be reluctant to specifically link the Bell's palsy to the vaccination because, in general, (IIRC) Bell's palsy is one of those afflictions that the medical community doesn't really have a good grasp on why people develop it.

My wife suffers from it from time to time and it seems to rear its head when she's feeling particularly stressed. The first time she got it was when she was getting ready for the CPA exam. Then she got it when she was 8-months pregnant with our 2nd child (at the same time that our oldest brought home lice and gave it to my wife and she had also seemed to gain all of her pregnancy weight in her feet and ankles so it was quite the time!). She developed it again back in the spring of last year when everything sort of shut down. This last time she got it, it was particularly bad and it looked like she had lost the muscle control on one entire half of her face and it took longer for it to go away than normal. This time was bad enough that her doctor prescribed her a steroid for it.

The stuff I've read is that most folks who develop Bell's palsy have probably been living with it for years (or since birth?) and never knew it and then their body's neurological system or immune system reacts to some sort of external force and that triggers the symptoms. My wife's doctor told her it was probably in her dormant for years and may have been leftover from another virus she may have picked up anywhere along the way. The stress she was experiencing at home likely weakened her immune system, allowing the dormant Bell's palsy to reactivate.
 

Lowland

Cyburbian
Messages
138
Points
6

Immunity to Covid-19 could be lost in months, UK study suggests​

https://www.theguardian.com/world/2...-19-could-be-lost-in-months-uk-study-suggests

I've heard different studies come out over the last few months, some saying immunity lasts 8-10 months or more after a person has had Covid-19. I want to send this to every person I know that has suggested, "it's okay for me to hang out, I already got the virus in April/May/June so I'm immune."
 

michaelskis

Cyburbian
Messages
20,440
Points
53
How is she doing
I think her longest episode was maybe 3 weeks.

That would be great if it was only 3 weeks. But now she is not willing to set the second shot until someone can assure her that this will not get worse or become pro-longed.

She is not doing awesome with this. Between the physical aspect and the emotional aspect it has been really hard on her. Our son with Autism has been kind of keeping his distance from her because he is unsure what is going on and she does not really want to go anywhere that people might see.
 

Salmissra

Cyburbian
Messages
6,154
Points
34
It's been one week since dad's positive COVID test. Still no symptoms. His doctor gave him a steroid for his lungs, increased his vitamins D and B, and is on another blood thinner. His cardiologist's office is monitoring his pacemaker daily, and he's had video conferences with them since he can't go to them just yet.

I am so worried about him. Old people with bad hearts are much more vulnerable to disease.
 

Whose Yur Planner

Cyburbian
Messages
11,720
Points
43
Well, I got my first COVID test yesterday. I went to the clinic because of bronchitis. They tested me for COVID as part of it. It wasn't too bad. It didn't feel like they were trying to tickle my brain when they put the swabs up my nostrils.
 

michaelskis

Cyburbian
Messages
20,440
Points
53
Well, I have one for Y'all.

A neighbor of mine is now Vaccine Shaming those who have indicated that they are not sure if they want to get it until more studies are done.

But between seeing what is going on with my wife (BTW, it continues to get worse), and what the WHO is saying about the Moderna Vaccine for pregnant women, I don't blame people for being concerned.

What would you do if you were me?

(And kicking his ass is no longer being considered, although that was the top of my list last night...)
 
Top