• Ongoing coronavirus / COVID-19 discussion: how is the pandemic affecting your community, workplace, and wellness? 🦠

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Health 🏥 Coronavirus and other pandemics

Messages
2,935
Points
23
I talked to my mom about the vaccine. She had an adverse reaction to a vaccine when she was much younger (like school-aged). It wasn't Bells Palsy, and I can't for the life of me remember what it's called. It has the word "dance" in it, and she basically lost control of her body....
gtpeach
"Saint Vitus Dance":
I'm pretty sure that's the temporary vaccine-induced ailment your mother had.

It sounds exactly like the temporary medication-induced neuromuscular ailment I had in early 2003. That was when the docs had repeatedly injected me with anti-regurgitants after they treated me for food poisoning.

The newer name for St. Vitus' dance is
Chorea:
Chorea is characterized by brief, semi-directed, irregular movements that are not repetitive or rhythmic, but appear to flow from one muscle to the next. These 'dance-like' movements of chorea often occur with athetosis, which adds twisting and writhing movements. Walking may become difficult, and include odd postures and leg movements.
...the movements of chorea and ballism occur on their own, without conscious effort. Thus, chorea is said to be a hyperkinetic movement disorder. . . . When chorea is serious, slight movements will become thrashing motions...
The nightmare chorea experience is something that you never forget your entire life. After my chorea, I was able to join a support group with other middle-aged adults who had also had it.

In contrast, your mother was a girl, and at that time the only support available was a few medical professionals and other adults who tried to assure her that she would be fine and it would not happen again. With all that in mind, I can definitely understand why your mother fears what might happen if she has the Covid-19 vaccine.
 

gtpeach

Cyburbian
Messages
2,231
Points
25
gtpeach
"Saint Vitus Dance":
I'm pretty sure that's the temporary vaccine-induced ailment your mother had.

It sounds exactly like the temporary medication-induced neuromuscular ailment I had in early 2003. That was when the docs had repeatedly injected me with anti-regurgitants after they treated me for food poisoning.

The newer name for St. Vitus' dance is
Chorea:


The nightmare chorea experience is something that you never forget your entire life. After my chorea, I was able to join a support group with other middle-aged adults who had also had it.

In contrast, your mother was a girl, and at that time the only support available was a few medical professionals and other adults who tried to assure her that she would be fine and it would not happen again. With all that in mind, I can definitely understand why your mother fears what might happen if she has the Covid-19 vaccine.
Yes! That's exactly how she's described it, and the name sounds right! It does sound very terrifying. I'm sorry you experienced it as well. I have no idea how common it is, or if it's likely to be a recurring event if it's happened to you before. She did say that it wouldn't be that bad if it happened again since she could just stay home and there would be people that would take care of her. I reminded her that people should've been doing that when she was a child, too. Of course, they probably did (hard to say - she grew up on a farm in Iowa with a very strong "rub some dirt in it and keep going" philosophy), but I know it was really embarrassing to have some of that happen at school and kids aren't known for being especially gracious. Not to mention the more direct trauma of feeling unable to control your own body.
 

Dan

Dear Leader
Staff member
Moderator
Messages
19,147
Points
70
Typical pandemic movie: some scientists come up with a miracle vaccine within a few days, it's immediately rolled out to the public, and minutes later, there's a scene of nurses in a tent mass vaccinating people in a well behaved line. "We expect everybody in America will be vaccinated by the end of the day, sir!" Why can't those same folks in Hollywood run the COVID-19 vaccination program?

On Monday, I can register for Phase 1c in New York. I hope.

The UK variant has been in the area for a while, and rumor has it the South African is also in town. I just started double-masking; cloth over a Korean KF-94. The Korean masks are really comfortable, they have a good seal, and my readers don't fog.
 

Dan

Dear Leader
Staff member
Moderator
Messages
19,147
Points
70
"Saint Vitus Dance":
Reminds me of one of my favorite old threads.

the grip.jpg
 

Dan

Dear Leader
Staff member
Moderator
Messages
19,147
Points
70
Got a vaccine appointment! :D

At the end of March. :| :indifferrent:

In NYS, pharmacies are only giving the vaccines to the 65+ group, and county health department clinics are booked up to forever. I’m taking what I can get — a state mass vaccination site about a 70 minute drive away.

If I lived in downstate NY, I could get an appointment at any number of places for tomorrow. Because we’re a bunch of worthless second class citizen hicks past the Metro North zone, though, we have to wait until all the “real New Yorkers” are vaccinated first.
 
Messages
2,935
Points
23
If I lived in downstate NY, I could get an appointment at any number of places for tomorrow. Because we’re a bunch of worthless second class citizen hicks past the Metro. Roth zone, though, we have to wait until all the “real New Yorkers” are vaccinated first.
Dan
You can get your appointment soon in downstate NY and stay overnight(s) in one of the guest rooms in my Queens, NYC/LI house. It's in this area:
Of course your wife is welcomed here too. If she can't make the trip and you don't want to do it yourself, bring a relative(s) or friend(s) along with you. You can park in my garage and/or the free unregulated parking on the street. There's only one other person living in my house: a (Platonic) bachelor tenant in his late 60's. (His first Covid vaccine's scheduled for March 6.)
 

Doohickie

Cyburbian
Messages
3,585
Points
46
If I'm getting a shot Saturday I should find out tomorrow.
Well I finally have an appointment. Two, actually. I got one set up through UT Southwestern in Dallas on Friday (30 miles away). Then I was notified by Baylor Scott & White (the agency the county referred me to) that I can get the shot locally on Saturday. At the moment I have two appointments and once our internet is back (down due to the weather), I will probably cancel the one in Dallas. I want to verify the local one is, indeed, set up first.
 
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michaelskis

Cyburbian
Messages
20,597
Points
54
February 12, 2021

President Joe Biden to visit west Michigan vaccine facility on Thursday​

Biden will visit Pfizer's Portage (Kalamazoo County) facility, where it makes vaccines for COVID-19.
That's @Maister's backyard!

People are a little excited around here because the numbers are going the right direction for the first time since October.

My wife finally joined us for dinner this weekend. There is still no improvement but the place we were going to is a bit dark inside and the food is really good, so she was less worried.

Walgreens is now offering the Vaccine here but it is still doctors, first responders, and those older than 65. Teachers start on the 24th... I will be eligible in August 2024 at the rate we are going...
 

WSU MUP Student

Cyburbian
Messages
10,986
Points
51
My in-laws are scheduled for the 2nd doses of their vaccines later this week. My parents were finally able to get scheduled for their first doses in about a week and a half from now through a pharmacy. They're also on the waiting list for the county health department and I'm keeping my fingers crossed that they get an appointment sooner through that but either way I'm glad they're finally on their way.
 

Doohickie

Cyburbian
Messages
3,585
Points
46
The storm has done what the government couldn't (or didn't have the nads to) do: Stop the pandemic. Going into this storm, we had "improved" the number of new cases daily from well over 2000 in our county, to slightly less than that (1500-2000). Now no one is going anywhere except for truly essential stuff, and new cases have been dropping quickly. Yesterday we had fewer than 500 new cases. Hopefully it continues to drop.

Of course the hospital occupancy rate has dropped as well. With fewer than 15% of hospital patients infected with Covid, the state will allow loosening of restrictions. So this dip may be short lived.

The weather also pushed my Covid shot back a week.
 

jsk1983

Cyburbian
Messages
2,503
Points
25
The storm has done what the government couldn't (or didn't have the nads to) do: Stop the pandemic. Going into this storm, we had "improved" the number of new cases daily from well over 2000 in our county, to slightly less than that (1500-2000). Now no one is going anywhere except for truly essential stuff, and new cases have been dropping quickly. Yesterday we had fewer than 500 new cases. Hopefully it continues to drop.

Of course the hospital occupancy rate has dropped as well. With fewer than 15% of hospital patients infected with Covid, the state will allow loosening of restrictions. So this dip may be short lived.

The weather also pushed my Covid shot back a week.
If no one can get anywhere I'd imagine they are doing a lot less testing which would explain the drop...
 

WSU MUP Student

Cyburbian
Messages
10,986
Points
51
If no one can get anywhere I'd imagine they are doing a lot less testing which would explain the drop...

That's what I would imagine as well. If the numbers are still dropping about 10 - 14 days from now, that would probably be a sign that spread was slowed by people staying home. But yeah, right now, the lower numbers are probably more due to decreased testing.

It's also possible there will be a big spike in numbers in Texas 10 - 14 days from now as people who would be testing these past few days suddenly flood the test sites after the weather improves.

These are reasons why looking at moving averages is so much more useful than day-to-day numbers.
 

michaelskis

Cyburbian
Messages
20,597
Points
54
If I was a parent in this school district, I would be livid.


It does make me wonder about our local school districts and some of their intentions. The Governor has even come out and asked school boards to allow for at least some in-class learning. The county next to ours has announced that they will remain 100% virtual for the rest of the year. My district has the younger kids back full time, but my oldest is still home 3 days a week.

The frustrating thing is the science, research, and CDC have all indicated that not allowing these kids to be in school is a bigger risk than if they are virtual learning. That the risk of child to child transmission is extremely low and it is disproportionally hard on lower income families that have limited resources.
 

MD Planner

Cyburbian
Messages
2,840
Points
45
I feel for you and your kids. I think we will see an effect of the lack of learning that has occurred over the last year for a long time to come. I've also heard way too many stories of some seriously lazy ass teachers during the pandemic as well.
 

Doohickie

Cyburbian
Messages
3,585
Points
46
The frustrating thing is the science, research, and CDC have all indicated that not allowing these kids to be in school is a bigger risk than if they are virtual learning.
The frustrating thing as the husband of a teacher with auto-immune issues is people just saying "CDC says school is okay!"

This is not an unconditional statement. The CDC says in-person schooling is okay IF:
1. Students and teachers are spaced 6 feet apart.
2. Students and teachers wear masks.
3. Classrooms have adequate ventilation.
4. Schools are frequently disinfected.

Here's the rub: 1. and 3. are virtually impossible if all students return to school. 2. is very hard to enforce, especially in states with a lot of anti-maskers (school leadership just won't hold them to account), and 4. costs a lot of money.

So parents hear: CDC says in-person learning is okay; they picture
GettyImages-141090015-5ad4786efa6bcc0036b494de.jpg

and
JP-TRACKING-superJumbo.jpg

but those classrooms cannot possibly provide 6 feet of spacing and probably have old ventilation systems that would actually help spread the virus.
 

michaelskis

Cyburbian
Messages
20,597
Points
54
The frustrating thing as the husband of a teacher with auto-immune issues is people just saying "CDC says school is okay!"

This is not an unconditional statement. The CDC says in-person schooling is okay IF:
1. Students and teachers are spaced 6 feet apart.
2. Students and teachers wear masks.
3. Classrooms have adequate ventilation.
4. Schools are frequently disinfected.

Here's the rub: 1. and 3. are virtually impossible if all students return to school. 2. is very hard to enforce, especially in states with a lot of anti-maskers (school leadership just won't hold them to account), and 4. costs a lot of money.

So parents hear: CDC says in-person learning is okay; they picture
GettyImages-141090015-5ad4786efa6bcc0036b494de.jpg

and
JP-TRACKING-superJumbo.jpg

but those classrooms cannot possibly provide 6 feet of spacing and probably have old ventilation systems that would actually help spread the virus.

My younger two have been in school 5 days a week since October. The 6th Graders have been rotating out 2 in, 3 out and split into two groups so other than 1 day a week, there are always 6th graders in. They wear masks at all times other that when they are eating, they have the desks spread out, they are using the gym, and in many cases they have plastic barriers. They do temp screenings for all students and staff before they enter the building. They upgraded to a MERV 13 for all filters and they have continuous circulation for the HVAC system. Every night they wipe down all surfaces and they are able to disinfect everything each night. So, NO, that is not how I see it. There has been ZERO in cases on in-school transmission of COVID-19.

Hey, I get it. My wife has health issues and it has been determined that she can't get the second dose of the vaccine. But she is still a nurse working directly with COVID patients every week day (and sometimes on weekends if she gets called in. But the masks make a difference.
 
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Gedunker

Moderating
Staff member
Moderator
Messages
11,729
Points
45
Just got an email from the Indiana Department of Health that I am now eligible for the COVID-19 vaccine. Woo hoo. Wait ... how do they know how old I am ...
 

michaelskis

Cyburbian
Messages
20,597
Points
54
This is interesting. It looks like Teachers may be the leading cause of COVID in schools.


It makes me wonder if there is something with teacher interaction what would put them at greater risk than other essential staff such as Nurses, Doctors, Police Officers, Fire Fighters, Public Utility Staff, and such. I realize that this study is not a full comprehensive study but it raises some interesting questions on how to keep our teachers safe while allowing for in-person education.
 

Veloise

Cyburbian
Messages
5,979
Points
34
Latest endeavor: after reading several articles about volunteers helping folks make vaccination appointments, I went on a large FB group (Midwest Vaccine Hunters) and asked if anyone wanted to help set something up in our fair state. A group of folks said YES.
We now have three regional groups. Detroit-area Vaccine Hunters is one. Presently we're trying to track down particulars on the "good neighbor" program, where the city of Detroit will vaccinate you if you bring in a Detroiter for their shot.
One of the counties opened up to 60+ so several volunteers called and called and refreshed the pages, making tons of appointments.
Regrettably, factual information is lacking in some of the groups. A woman from Oakland county drove her disabled husband to Mississippi, believing that they'd made a valid appointment and would be given the shot. They arrived, and were told about the delivery issues (snowstorms). And that that state was not vaccinating out-of-state residents.
Later that evening I saw a message about the Meijer a few miles from her having leftover shots, sent it along to her.

o look, an article ...

 
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bureaucrat#3

Member
Messages
103
Points
8
We have a current countywide vaccine clinic run by the local hospital. Local medical and nursing students are doing a lot of the work and I think some Emory students are helping as well. Volunteers for the clinic were also given the opportunity to get a vaccine. Our clinic finally had to change the rules to limit it to in-state residents only and requiring volunteer vaccines be given at the end of their shift.

Apparently people were driving from as far away as Pennsylvania to volunteer. They were given a shot at that time. Other volunteers would come in get their vaccination and then walk out the door without thinking twice. For the most part its run fairly smooth.
 

Veloise

Cyburbian
Messages
5,979
Points
34
aaauuugghhh ....

This morning I responded to someone who posted, in the Detroit Area Vaccine Hunters group, about an available appointment. It was in a couple of hours.
In Pennsylvania.

Folks keep posting hasanyonegottenavaccineinohio without reading the other posts. There's a whole section explaining how to hit up the Rite Aid locations in metro Toledo (just across the state line).

Folks who clearly have some computer skills ask about finding appointments. The referrals are to vaxxmax.com (which displays openings at nearby Rite Aid branches), bookacovidvaccine.com (independent pharmacies), call your nearest Walgreens/Meijer/Kroger that's not in a high density population area, ask to be added to the leftover shot list.
The response is always something like "we looked in Grand Rapids yesterday." (OP is in Owosso, 90 minutes from here)
Replies: a screenshot of available appointments today in Rite Aids less than 30 minutes away.

In the Midwest group (set up as an exercise in self-aggrandizement, it seems) was a post about "there's no group for Kansas City does anyone knowwwww..." The following post was from Milwaukee: "we just set up this local group." I cross-referenced the two.

How did these people ever score lawn seats for Chicago at Pine Knob? Or manage to be the fifth caller for the tractor pull at the Palace?!?
 

Doohickie

Cyburbian
Messages
3,585
Points
46
My younger two have been in school 5 days a week since October. The 6th Graders have been rotating out 2 in, 3 out and split into two groups so other than 1 day a week, there are always 6th graders in. They wear masks at all times other that when they are eating, they have the desks spread out, they are using the gym, and in many cases they have plastic barriers. They do temp screenings for all students and staff before they enter the building. They upgraded to a MERV 13 for all filters and they have continuous circulation for the HVAC system. Every night they wipe down all surfaces and they are able to disinfect everything each night. So, NO, that is not how I see it. There has been ZERO in cases on in-school transmission of COVID-19.

Hey, I get it. My wife has health issues and it has been determined that she can't get the second dose of the vaccine. But she is still a nurse working directly with COVID patients every week day (and sometimes on weekends if she gets called in. But the masks make a difference.
It sounds like they're enforcing protocols. They're not really doing that here.
 

Salmissra

Cyburbian
Messages
6,192
Points
34
We signed up on the adjacent county to the west's list, so we're both on 3 lists. I work in one county, live in another, so either one of those are an easy drive to get to an appointment.

Here's hoping!
 

Doohickie

Cyburbian
Messages
3,585
Points
46
We signed up on the adjacent county to the west's list, so we're both on 3 lists. I work in one county, live in another, so either one of those are an easy drive to get to an appointment.

Here's hoping!
If you haven't signed up through UT Southwestern yet, that's another option. See my Facebook post for more information.
It's back to Registration Paused, but check every day. When they secure new vaccine supplies they open it back up. It was open earlier today.
 

Veloise

Cyburbian
Messages
5,979
Points
34
Latest endeavor: after reading several articles about volunteers helping folks make vaccination appointments, I went on a large FB group (Midwest Vaccine Hunters) and asked if anyone wanted to help set something up in our fair state. A group of folks said YES.
We now have three regional groups. Detroit-area Vaccine Hunters is one. Presently we're trying to track down particulars on the "good neighbor" program, where the city of Detroit will vaccinate you if you bring in a Detroiter for their shot.
One of the counties opened up to 60+ so several volunteers called and called and refreshed the pages, making tons of appointments.
Regrettably, factual information is lacking in some of the groups. A woman from Oakland county drove her disabled husband to Mississippi, believing that they'd made a valid appointment and would be given the shot. They arrived, and were told about the delivery issues (snowstorms). And that that state was not vaccinating out-of-state residents.
Later that evening I saw a message about the Meijer a few miles from her having leftover shots, sent it along to her.

o look, an article ...

Hahahaha. A fellow Cybub sent me the link to this, apparently it was published in that local paper.
 

JNA

Cyburbian Plus
Messages
26,422
Points
68
Multiple news websites reporting this -
The Pfizer/BioNTech and Moderna vaccines, which both use new messenger RNA technology, showed efficacy of around 95% percent in preventing illness in large trials, while J&J’s showed efficacy of around 66%.

However, the trials had important differences, making comparison difficult. Pfizer and Moderna focused on efficacy against mild-to-moderate sickness, while J&J’s trial looked for efficacy against moderate-to-severe COVID-19.
 

michaelskis

Cyburbian
Messages
20,597
Points
54
Multiple news websites reporting this -
Personally, I think I am going to hold out for the J&J shot when its available. Apparently the Washington Post says:
Johnson & Johnson vaccine does not use mRNA. Rather, it's what's known as an adenovirus vector vaccine. It uses the more established approach of employing a harmless cold virus to deliver a gene that carries the blueprint for the spiky protein found on the surface of the coronavirus.
 

Planit

Cyburbian
Messages
13,924
Points
55

Super Amputee Cat

Cyburbian
Messages
2,423
Points
33
You can put DeSantis on your list too.
Yes, I forgot about DeSantis. I would probably actually put him above Abbott. It's just been so long since I've heard him spewing out his vomitious diatribe that I kind of forgot. So I guess that I'll just relegate Abbott to Asshole of the Week not only due to his handling of the Coronavirus but the massive electrical power failures as well. But that doesn't let him of the hook for the thousands of murders he has committed already.
 
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