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Health 🏥 Coronavirus and other pandemics

michaelskis

Cyburbian
Messages
20,738
Points
56
Having some fun in the Detroit vaccine hunters groups. Because people won't read text posts

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some genius replied to this one: "that's a Lions game"
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These are on deck

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Fake News... The Detroit Lions don't have that many fans...






A an anti-mask doctor on social media posted that the new cases and severity of the cases in TX continue to decline despite the Governor's decision to lift the mask mandate. My first thought was BS... but then I looked into the data a bit deeper.


Do you think it is just because of the number of people who have been vaccinated, do you think people are not getting tested, or do you think that there was just such a large percentage in the urban areas that got it, that they have a short-term immunity to it?

Personally, I support the masks mandate until way more people get vaccinated.
 

jsk1983

Cyburbian
Messages
2,507
Points
25
Fake News... The Detroit Lions don't have that many fans...






A an anti-mask doctor on social media posted that the new cases and severity of the cases in TX continue to decline despite the Governor's decision to lift the mask mandate. My first thought was BS... but then I looked into the data a bit deeper.


Do you think it is just because of the number of people who have been vaccinated, do you think people are not getting tested, or do you think that there was just such a large percentage in the urban areas that got it, that they have a short-term immunity to it?

Personally, I support the masks mandate until way more people get vaccinated.
Or the the lack of a mandate isn't actually going to change behavior all that much. Businesses can still require one and lets face it some had been ignoring it all along anyways...
 

michaelskis

Cyburbian
Messages
20,738
Points
56
Or the the lack of a mandate isn't actually going to change behavior all that much. Businesses can still require one and lets face it some had been ignoring it all along anyways...
Interesting thought, the law to protect people might not supersede people's personal opinion and action.
 

Doohickie

Cyburbian
Messages
3,684
Points
46
I just found out I lost a cousin* to Covid. :( Julie was 72.

*she was actually my dad's cousin, but closer to my age than to my dad's age. Hers was the first wedding I can remember going to (I was 12). Her husband is one of the family genealogists. I've been getting closer my dad's family lately by virtue of a family Facebook page. She was one of the family members I was looking forward to meeting with on a future trip to Buffalo.
 

Doohickie

Cyburbian
Messages
3,684
Points
46
A an anti-mask doctor on social media posted that the new cases and severity of the cases in TX continue to decline despite the Governor's decision to lift the mask mandate. My first thought was BS... but then I looked into the data a bit deeper.

Do you think it is just because of the number of people who have been vaccinated, do you think people are not getting tested, or do you think that there was just such a large percentage in the urban areas that got it, that they have a short-term immunity to it?

Personally, I support the masks mandate until way more people get vaccinated.
I'm "boots on the ground" in Texas. We were cranking out as many as 3000 new cases per day in my county in January. It was going down steadily since then, and then we had the Texas Freeze the week following Valentine's Day. Basically all social contact stopped as people went out only when absolutely necessary. The number of new cases plummeted. It rebounded some, but has remained relatively low. A couple weeks after that the governor lifted the mask mandate and occupancy restrictions, but allowed businesses to continue them as they saw fit. Many businesses have continued to require masks, most (but not all) people who were wearing masks when out among others still wear them. So despite lifting of the mandate, it's still largely being followed. There's just no more yelling at people who don't wear them.

AS of today (3/29), any Texas adult can get the Covid vaccine. I got my second dose Saturday by virtue of my high blood pressure. There are mass vaccination sites where you don't even get out of your car, giving hundreds of shots per hour. You can register for a vaccine through your county health department, your doctor/healthcare provider, your pharmacy, and now many employers are offering the shots including schools.

My employer will be doing mass vaccinations similar to what they do for the flu every year (I won't need the shot since I've already been vaccinated). My employer is talking about bringing all of us who have been working from home back to the office in waves in April and May, but I'm pretty sure they will still require masks except when in your own cubicle or eating in the cafeteria.

Texas is at 13% fully vaccinated, 25% one dose. My understanding (based on actual cases I've heard about) is that even high risk people fair well handling Covid if they've gotten at least one shot, and are infectious for a smaller time period. I think of Texas as two populations: The population that took the virus seriously and the one that didn't. The population that did take it seriously was still catching and passing the virus, perhaps not as frequently as those who didn't take it seriously, but they still got caught up in it. With a good chunk of those people vaccinated, the virus just isn't spreading as effectively in that population, and in the population that doesn't take it seriously, it's still going around. It's just not getting as many chances to spread, since the two populations do mingle.

And like I said, most people who were wearing masks still continue to do so, despite loosening of restrictions. In fact I get the sense that the mask wearing contingent is being even more diligent about wearing them, possibly as a reaction to the "shock" of seeing people going without masks. We've been accustomed to reacting negatively to unprotected people.

I think many of the people who say the don't want the vaccine will, in the end, get it anyway, assuming Covid "passports" are needed to go to concerts, sporting events, travel by air, etc. They may not like it but after a while having to continue to wear a mask at events and/or pay for Covid tests will get old and they'll get the shot because life it just too inconvenient without it.

In fact I'm a little surprised there isn't a federal Covid passport app yet. Several states have one, but not Texas.
 

Doohickie

Cyburbian
Messages
3,684
Points
46
While Texas is getting better, it, as well as the U.S. in general, experienced more deaths from Covid that the rest of the world. Texas deaths per 100,000 is just about the same as the national average, which are both about 10-12% worse than the global aveage.
 

kms

Cyburbian
Messages
6,793
Points
44
I just found out I lost a cousin* to Covid. :( Julie was 72.

*she was actually my dad's cousin, but closer to my age than to my dad's age. Hers was the first wedding I can remember going to (I was 12). Her husband is one of the family genealogists. I've been getting closer my dad's family lately by virtue of a family Facebook page. She was one of the family members I was looking forward to meeting with on a future trip to Buffalo.
I’m sorry.
 

Maister

Chairman of the bored
Staff member
Moderator
Messages
29,642
Points
73
Pfizer #2 made me feel tired and blah the following day, but taking afterwards Tylenol and staying hydrated helped a lot. I did hear taking Tylenol before the shot is even better, but I heard that advice after it was all said and done.
I'd heard one should avoid taking anything that suppresses or delays one's immune responses after getting the vaccination. Then again, I heard the leader of the free world suggest shooting up bleach might be a good idea too.
 

WSU MUP Student

Cyburbian
Messages
11,106
Points
52
I'd heard one should avoid taking anything that suppresses or delays one's immune responses after getting the vaccination. Then again, I heard the leader of the free world suggest shooting up bleach might be a good idea too.

I had heard the same thing about stuff affecting the immune system but that Tylenol/acetometaphine works primarily to treat the symptoms (headache, muscle ache, fever) and has a minimal affect on the immune system but that ibuprofen should be avoided because it works primarily as an anti-inflammatory and you need that inflammation response because that's part of what goes into antibody production.

So my understanding was that Tylenol was fine but no matter what the Corpsman tells you, lay off the Vitamin M.
 

Veloise

Cyburbian
Messages
6,024
Points
36
AIB Dan and the banhammer krewe

! onezies.png
 

kjel

Super Moderator
Staff member
Moderator
Messages
12,600
Points
44
One dose of the Moderna/Pfizer vaccines confers about 50% immunity one week post first shot. It also lessens the severity of COVID and significantly reduces the likelihood of death if you are in the unlucky 50% to get it. My husband was in the unlucky 50%, got COVID and STILL was hospitalized. He was not classified as having severe complications as he was not in the ICU or on a ventilator. It's still scary shit.

Get a vaccine if you don't have any contraindications, wear a mask, practice social distancing. 85% is generally the target for so called herd immunity. That 85% is comprised of people that have had the disease and therefore have antibodies or people that have been vaccinated. The thing with COVID is that we're unsure how long immunity lasts and if that immunity is susceptible to variants.
 

Doohickie

Cyburbian
Messages
3,684
Points
46
I had heard the same thing about stuff affecting the immune system but that Tylenol/acetometaphine works primarily to treat the symptoms (headache, muscle ache, fever) and has a minimal affect on the immune system but that ibuprofen should be avoided because it works primarily as an anti-inflammatory and you need that inflammation response because that's part of what goes into antibody production.

So my understanding was that Tylenol was fine but no matter what the Corpsman tells you, lay off the Vitamin M.
I heard the same: No Advil, only Tylenol. I took one Tylenol after my second shot to knock the edge off.
 

Doohickie

Cyburbian
Messages
3,684
Points
46
But literally ALL of Michigan looks bad. :(

I can't explain it other than to say a lot of people are getting vaxxed, but the gov. here in Texas removed restrictions and cases are still staying pretty low. Our county was one of the worst in the country in January, we're only seeing about 5% as many daily new cases now, even with things opening.
 

Hink

OH....IO
Staff member
Moderator
Messages
16,317
Points
59
The Pfizer vaccine could be 100% effective for kids 12-15?! Well shit, we need to get rolling on that. Like ASAP. They don't get as sick, but they spread that stuff like crazy (not really, but they are spreaders). Can we just require kids who want to be in-person at school to just get the Pfizer vaccine, or are we going to deal with the anti-vax parents who think measles and mumps went away because of the extra tree root you drank in your tea?

If we can get rolling on this, next Fall is going to be looking very good. If we can get the age down to ALL school aged kids, this would really help.
 

WSU MUP Student

Cyburbian
Messages
11,106
Points
52
Geez, Michigan....

My parents (as well as a lot of my family and a lot of my wife's family) live in St. Clair County which is now one of the worst in the country in terms of positivity. Last I saw, it was something like 27% positive. My parents get their second doses tomorrow and I've got my 2nd dose already. Things aren't as bad here in my county (though it's still pretty bad). Even with a full dose of the vaccine it makes things scary since the faster cases rise, the more opportunity there is for mutations to develop.

On a little bit brighter note, deaths are still way down. Looking at the data, we haven't had a COVID death in the county since the 17th of March and we've only had 10 deaths all month even though we've been averaging about 500 cases a day over the past few weeks (I understand that there can be a big lag in the reporting of deaths).

From what I've seen here in Michigan, the rise in cases has been primarily concentrated in folks 0-19 and 20-29 and then to a lessor extent 30-39.
 

bureaucrat#3

Member
Messages
116
Points
8
Alabama was just rated dead last in states for vaccine rollout. About 1/3 of adults have received a vaccine, about 1/3 have no intentions of receiving a vaccine, and about 1/3 are unsure. Our local clinic, run through the hospital, is starting to taper down in staffing and days of the week.

With only a month left of before college students leave, we might miss another surge. Hopefully enough people will be vaccinated before football season, because its sounding like the stadiums will be full capacity.
 

Gedunker

Moderating
Staff member
Moderator
Messages
11,791
Points
46
Indiana has lowered vaccination ages to 16+. My daughter (21YO) has her first shot scheduled for Sunday the 11th. When she told me she would be among the first to register, she wasn't kidding. I'm proud of her.
 

WSU MUP Student

Cyburbian
Messages
11,106
Points
52
Instead of waiting 6+ weeks since my last trip to go to the grocery store I went today a mere 2 weeks after my latest trip. I would have waited longer but I really wanted to get a ham for Easter dinner (they didn't have small ones last time I went). It's nice being vaccinated so I wasn't as apprehensive about making an extra trip and risking extra exposure, though I'd also like to point out I bought much more than just that ham and we should be good for at least 3 weeks now.

I will add that I get sort of jealous when I see people with little stickers or buttons that they got from the pharmacy or one of the local hospital systems advertising that they've been vaccinated. I wish the VA would have given me one but it was a pretty bare-bones, impersonal operation in there.
 

Salmissra

Cyburbian
Messages
6,233
Points
35
Hubby had a sore but not painful arm at bedtime last night.

This morning he has a mild sore throat, sore arm, and general sense of "meh". He slept well but is still tired.

I'm hoping this is the only effect he has, but it's only the day after.
 

Faust_Motel

Cyburbian
Messages
842
Points
33
On track for the vax to be available to all adults in my state before the end of June.

Workplace starting to think about ending WFH arrangements and possibly reopening offices to the public on some limited basis.

Introverts in the office not thrilled.

Spouse got their first shot due to working in an afterschool program, I am eligible soon.
 

TOFB

Cyburbian
Messages
2,916
Points
38
I got Pfizer #2 yesterday. The pain is no worse than if I slept on that side all night (which I did). I have a ton of yard work to do and I wish I could use the side effects as an excuse not to, but I can't.
 

WSU MUP Student

Cyburbian
Messages
11,106
Points
52
My wife finally has an appointment for a shot.

One of our neighbors is an MD and epidemiologist and the head of the pharmacy program at my alma mater and I saw him outside yesterday while I was grilling dinner. Our conversations usually revolve around running and the gym and UofM sports but it veered off towards COVID and vaccines. I know he used to work at the VA in Atlanta so I mentioned how grateful I was for being able to get my vaccine at the VA so easily but that my wife was still trying to get an appointment. He gave us a number for her to call at the university and 10 minutes later she had an appointment for the J&J shot later this week.

Judging by how scheduling has worked for others I know of, this probably means she's going to get calls and emails between now and then from about 6 different lists she's on offering her appointment times.

On a related note: I had forgotten that I also put myself on the waitlist in my parent's county when I was trying to get them appointments back in January. Yesterday was the first day in Michigan that everybody 16 and over became eligible and of course I got an email offering me a shot tomorrow. I wish there was an option to transfer it to my wife but oh well. I just declined and removed myself from the list.
 

Veloise

Cyburbian
Messages
6,024
Points
36
Hilarious.
I went through all the posts that I'd carefully tagged with the topic for this drive-through clinic. Synthesized several people's experiences, how to make an appointment, when the new ones are dropped on the website, who's running it, etc. etc.
I visited the maps and found a street view that shows the building, the location, the signage on the building.
I made a complete narrative.
And someone asks, "iS tHi$ ReaL?"
 

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WSU MUP Student

Cyburbian
Messages
11,106
Points
52
Will there be a return to "normal" at your place of work or will there be some sort of new-normal?

I go in to the office 2x a week and most seem to come in once or twice, but there are still a bunch of folks who only come in once a month... or less. As we get further and further along in this, it sounds like our administration is going to allow people to permanently keep working semi-remotely, if it's appropriate for their position. In our office, that means there are a lot of folks like our Business Development reps and many of our planners who will not be probably keep coming in once every ~4-6 weeks so does it really make sense to keep letting them take up so much floor space?There is scuttlebutt that management is looking at physically rearranging a lot of the space.

Right now, our department takes up an entire floor of the office building (if I had to guess, I'd say we probably have about 10,000 sqft but I honestly really have no idea) and it's divided up into offices and a fairly large cubes for about 50 of us. Besides a small copy room and a kitchen, there aren't many common areas and one common complaint from day 1 in this building has been that it's very impersonal and not very conducive to collaboration (the walls of the cubes are about 8' high, effectively making each cube an office without a door.

Maybe this staid county government office building will move in the 21st century of office design and remove and/or rearrange a lot of the now unused and underutilized cubicles and give us some more communal areas to work in. I don't think I'd want to sit in an open office all day on the days I come in, but I'd definitely be willing to go sit on a couch or some comfortable chair for an hour or so when I first come in in the morning while I drink my coffee and respond to emails or whatever.

I know it's probably just wishful thinking and their idea of rearranging likely just means getting rid of a few unused copiers and moving some filing cabinets around.
 

Planit

Cyburbian
Messages
14,065
Points
57
^I know a private A&E company here that is gutting their office square footage/footprint by half.


This is probably going to be more of a norm. I guess the next article we see in planning magazine will be how office park buildings are being renovated and turned into apartments blocks with tons of parking and amenities.
 

Salmissra

Cyburbian
Messages
6,233
Points
35
Our agency is looking at how to return to an in-person office setting, but taking into account the benefits seen with the total WFH setting we've had since last March.

In the mix:
-hybrid meetings
-2 or 3 days in the office/2 or 3 days at home
-shared office space
-in-person conversations/interactions
-transition time so it's not an abrupt new requirement

Overall it's still in discussion phase and most likely no change until June. Fingers crossed that we get multiple days to WFH!
 

WSU MUP Student

Cyburbian
Messages
11,106
Points
52
^I know a private A&E company here that is gutting their office square footage/footprint by half.


This is probably going to be more of a norm. I guess the next article we see in planning magazine will be how office park buildings are being renovated and turned into apartments blocks with tons of parking and amenities.

I imagine there are some major changes coming to the private commercial real estate market, especially in some of the more expensive and more dense downtowns. I haven't looked at CoStar in a while so maybe it's already happening but I expect vacancies to start rising pretty quickly while asking rates fall. Maybe it will also be a boon for some of our smaller downtowns where some businesses would really like to be located but have avoided for years because of space constraints.
 

Veloise

Cyburbian
Messages
6,024
Points
36
Folks in the Detroit group were expressing anxiety regarding their shot (which had been administered). I tried to help 'em out.
congrats.png

And someone heading in asked about purses.
Moderator: the venue allows bags.

! fan bag.jpg
 

Gedunker

Moderating
Staff member
Moderator
Messages
11,791
Points
46
Indiana went from a mask mandate to a mask advisory this week principally so the governor can sit on the fence and try to have it both ways. Pretty much everybody I have come across so far has still been masked, but I get the sense it won't stay that way much longer. I worry that as it relaxes further, I'm going to feel uncomfortable being masked, especially entering places where masking was once unwelcome - you know, places like banks and liquor stores.
 

MD Planner

Cyburbian
Messages
2,955
Points
47
Comment from a buddy of mine in Los Angeles in late March 2020: "Everyone looks like they're going to knock over a liquor store."

Reminds me of an old Dennis Miller bit: "The hardest job in America has to be a bank guard in Alaska. You got 50 people in the place, they're all wearing ski masks!" :roflmao:
 

JNA

Cyburbian Plus
Messages
26,518
Points
70
According to the state GIS vaccine map, my fair county has 19 locations
color coded according to the type.
 

jsk1983

Cyburbian
Messages
2,507
Points
25
Indiana went from a mask mandate to a mask advisory this week principally so the governor can sit on the fence and try to have it both ways. Pretty much everybody I have come across so far has still been masked, but I get the sense it won't stay that way much longer. I worry that as it relaxes further, I'm going to feel uncomfortable being masked, especially entering places where masking was once unwelcome - you know, places like banks and liquor stores.
I feel like its really individual businesses enforcing this or not. Not sure there was ever much governmental enforcement of a lot of these things.
 

Salmissra

Cyburbian
Messages
6,233
Points
35
I got my second Moderna shot yesterday.

My arm hurt before I got home. Slept poorly, weird dreams, and have been tired all day. Hopefully, this will pass and I can be productive tomorrow (I have a meeting that must go well!).
 

WSU MUP Student

Cyburbian
Messages
11,106
Points
52
I was flipping through the channels yesterday morning while my daughter was eating breakfast and noticed my next door neighbor was on the news. It's sort of boring, and his very white hair doesn't work well with the "green screen", but it's still interesting information and they talk a bit at the start of the segment about the recent surge here in Michigan:

 
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