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Health 🏥 Coronavirus and other pandemics

WSU MUP Student

Cyburbian
Messages
11,254
Points
52
There was a case in a kindergarten class at my kids school. It looks like it was in the neighbor girl's class since she is now home the past couple days. Hopefully she doesn't have it (I doubt that she would since I know they go out as infrequently as we do and the dad has been fully vaccinated) but it sucks because now we'll have to keep our daughter away, at least for another week or so, if they see each other outside and want to play together. :disappointed"


We also learned that my wife's cousin's FIL died Monday down in Indiana from pneumonia that he got while infected with COVID. We'd only met the inlaws a couple of times and from what I gathered last year, they weren't the type to wear masks or stop having large gatherings.
 

Planit

Cyburbian
Messages
14,267
Points
57
Mom had her 2nd shot early this week. She said she didn't have any issues and thinks drinking water and taking Tylenol helped that.

Three of her friends drove her to the place, then went, had lunch together and made a day out of it. All were vaccinated with at least one shot.
 

Doohickie

Cyburbian
Messages
3,887
Points
46
At least 8 of 25 people on my floor have or had it. Crickets from the Admin. This is wrong.
When someone in my company (several thousand people on this site) gets Covid, they will announce that a new case was identified in "Area XYZ", do a deep cleaning in that area, and contact trace everyone who might have had contact with the person on the job.
 
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Doohickie

Cyburbian
Messages
3,887
Points
46
Our county is now aggressively notifying all residents that they have shots available for anyone who needs it. I got an email, a text and a robocall yesterday. The email had a link to sign up, opt out, or state that you've been vaxed and not bug you anymore. I don't know what percent of people have been vaxed in our county but I get the sense that demand is subsiding and they want to make sure everyone who needs it gets it before they wind down the effort.

Seems to be working. Things are opening up but new cases are flat, even decreasing. We were around three hundred new cases per day, then 200-300, now the last week or so it's been less than 200 every day (2.1 million in the country). Only 3% of hospital occupancy is Covid related. And this is in the county where the Texas Rangers are famously playing home games at full capacity.

Even though restrictions are lifted, only a relatively small portion of the population is living without them. Most people are still wearing masks in public (though not as much as it used to be). Most people are still opting for takeout instead of dine in. Most people who dine at the restaurant are out on the patio. I think those of us who've been careful want to make sure the virus is truly under control before easing up.

At my company they are "reintegrating" the workforce which means the work from home people are coming back. In the office though they're still requiring masks except when a person is at their desk. A lot of people wear them at their desks unless eating. And in my case, I'm only going in two days a week which is the plan going forward in the future (i.e., never going to be going in more than that on a regular basis). The company has classified everyone as A, B, C, D: A are people who have to be at work such as manufacturing personnel. B are people who are more effective coming in and will be required to work in the office at least 50%. C are people who can fully do their job remotely but still will come into the office regularly. D are full time telecommuters.

I'm a "B" and although I'm supposed to be in the office more than 50% of the time my boss said working 2 days in the office and 2 from home (4x10 schedule) is fine; he's not going worry about "greater" than 50%.
 
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MD Planner

Cyburbian
Messages
3,124
Points
49
We're fast getting to the point where anyone will be able to go some place and get a shot right away. There are a lot of people who have absolutely no interest in getting vaccinated.

My county is not nearly as populous as many of yours but we have a significant amount of tourists and folks with second/vacation homes who are here and many who have been here for months. Our cases have been averaging under 7 new cases per day. Restaurants are packed, the beaches are busy and most retail establishments are doing ok. The county and most municipalities let their mask mandates expire last week but are still encouraging people to wear them and are also making it clear that businesses have the right to require wearing a mask for service. Almost 50% of county residents aged 15 and up have received at least one shot so that's really encouraging.
 

JNA

Cyburbian Plus
Messages
26,678
Points
70

New Evidence Uncovered of Human-to-Cat Transmission of COVID-19 Coronavirus​

 

JNA

Cyburbian Plus
Messages
26,678
Points
70

safe_image.php
 

Doohickie

Cyburbian
Messages
3,887
Points
46
That's scary. It's also not unlikely the numbers are actually higher than reported.
My son heard a report that actual numbers are estimated to be between 5 and 20 TIMES higher.

As a comparison, I recently looked at "excess deaths" in the US on the CDC website and it indicates the official COVID death toll in the US (based on death certificates citing COVID as a cause of death) is about 10% below the actual excess deaths over the past year, indicating and undercount of about 10%.
 

Whose Yur Planner

Cyburbian
Messages
12,015
Points
46

terraplnr

Cyburbian
Messages
2,442
Points
30
Our offices will be opening to the public again starting in about a month. The first few weeks are going to be a little weird!
 

Hink

OH....IO
Staff member
Moderator
Messages
16,441
Points
59
My kid gets the shot tomorrow! I wish I could get all my kids the shot, but it seems they aren't going to be approving it for children under 12 before August.

Our governor put an incentive of $1million to people in Ohio to get the shot, which I think is great, but many think it is stupid. Not sure if it is going to actually incentivize anyone or not, but I do feel like the "buy a lotto ticket every week" crowd, probably is similar to the "I don't want a vaccination because of government databases" crowd.... so maybe it will work.

Dewine is also giving away a couple 4 year scholarships to kids 12-17 who get it. It is sad that people need to be incentivized to do the right thing, but if it works for even a couple people, it was worth the investment.
 

Maister

Chairman of the bored
Staff member
Moderator
Messages
30,162
Points
74
Our governor put an incentive of $1million to people in Ohio to get the shot, which I think is great, but many think it is stupid. Not sure if it is going to actually incentivize anyone or not, but I do feel like the "buy a lotto ticket every week" crowd, probably is similar to the "I don't want a vaccination because of government databases" crowd.... so maybe it will work.
Sounds like a good idea to me. Greed can be a potent motive. The odds of winning such a raffle would be considerably better than the lottery. Instead of one in multi-millions odds, we're probably talking one in thousands odds.
 

Bubba

Cyburbian
Messages
5,903
Points
47
Our governor put an incentive of $1million to people in Ohio to get the shot, which I think is great, but many think it is stupid.

So you think there's no better use of that money by your state government?
 

MD Planner

Cyburbian
Messages
3,124
Points
49
Yeah, I just don't see money being a great incentive. Let's face it, if you want it you're going to get it. Those who are resistant aren't going to suddenly change their mind because a few bucks are thrown their way.
 

jsk1983

Cyburbian
Messages
2,532
Points
25
Yeah, I just don't see money being a great incentive. Let's face it, if you want it you're going to get it. Those who are resistant aren't going suddenly change there mind because a few bucks are thrown their way.
I assume some people are fairly neutral. And others are adamantly opposed and its going to take a lot to change their mind.
 

Bubba

Cyburbian
Messages
5,903
Points
47
How does it compare to being TV advertising? Not sure what is better bang for ones buck...
Is there state government funded TV advertising for getting the shot? I honestly have no idea - the only live TV I watch is sports (I record everything else and fast-forward through commercials or watch it on demand with no commercials), and I generally tune out the commercials when I'm watching football or my beloved Braves.
 

Hink

OH....IO
Staff member
Moderator
Messages
16,441
Points
59
So you think there's no better use of that money by your state government?
$1 million seems like a lot, but if that gets another 20,000 people vaccinated, that saves several extended ICU visits / admissions, which could add up to several millions in savings. An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure.

So, yes I think it is a good use of money. If all things were equal, there are MUCH better uses, but people still don't think they should get the vaccine. Sadly we are not in the times where logic and reason are available for many. Which necessitates us to act in a different manner.
 

Doohickie

Cyburbian
Messages
3,887
Points
46
So you think there's no better use of that money by your state government?
I would think of it as an investment. How much state cost is avoided? If it's more than the money spent, then yes, this is a fine use of the money.
 

Maister

Chairman of the bored
Staff member
Moderator
Messages
30,162
Points
74
So, yes I think it is a good use of money. If all things were equal, there are MUCH better uses, but people still don't think they should get the vaccine. Sadly we are not in the times where logic and reason are available for many. Which necessitates us to act in a different manner.
Sad but true.
 

michaelskis

Cyburbian
Messages
20,882
Points
57
Despite the lifting of restrictions from the CDC and the Gov. of NC. we are keeping social distancing and some mask requirements in place for meetings in conference rooms.
 

WSU MUP Student

Cyburbian
Messages
11,254
Points
52
Our county administration probably did not win over any friends among staff by picking the absolute nicest day of the year so far to announce our "Return to Work" plan. :ha:

Thankfully WFH will still be an option, at department discretion, for 2 days a week going into the future. I was hoping to be able to keep working from home 3 days a week, but I'm not going to complain.

No word yet on when our building will be open to the public (not that we ever got any foot traffic).
 

jsk1983

Cyburbian
Messages
2,532
Points
25
I'm sort of curious when changing rooms in clothing stores will open back up. The only place I've seen them open is Goodwill so I know its a company policy not a government mandate. I generally know what size I am, but have had to return some stuff since I couldn't try it on in the store and clothing sizes tend not to be standardized.
 

Planit

Cyburbian
Messages
14,267
Points
57
& from our manager -

1621363364411.png


"I’m sure by now everyone has heard that the Centers for Disease Control has lifted nearly all COVID-19 Restrictions for fully vaccinated people. Additionally, Governor Cooper has issued Executive Order 215 that also lifts restrictions for COVID-19. In consideration of these changes I am reopening our facilities consistent with the guidance and face masks will not be required for persons who are fully vaccinated."
 

kms

Cyburbian
Messages
6,871
Points
45
& from our manager -

View attachment 51551

"I’m sure by now everyone has heard that the Centers for Disease Control has lifted nearly all COVID-19 Restrictions for fully vaccinated people. Additionally, Governor Cooper has issued Executive Order 215 that also lifts restrictions for COVID-19. In consideration of these changes I am reopening our facilities consistent with the guidance and face masks will not be required for persons who are fully vaccinated."
Our boss sent that to us a couple of weeks ago. She's still requiring us to wear masks and isn't opening the office yet.
 

Veloise

Cyburbian
Messages
6,068
Points
37
Last night I attended my third rehearsal with this ensemble I've wanted to join for quite a few years.
First two events: I was pretty much the only person wearing a mask. Saturday's performance was outdoors so I didn't wear it.

Last night I noticed a couple people had masks with them, and my stand-mate (sharing music) had one of those bell covers on his horn. ** During the break I put mine on, because I don't know these people, and I don't trust them. (Quite a few exhibit questionable judgement in other ways; I can't rely on them to have gotten vaccinated.)

Packing up, it turns out that the 30yo sitting on my other side is an anti-vaxxer. He has vaguely-formed opinions on everything. He hangs out at the upstate restaurant that was fined last year (HQ for recall petitions). He had not heard about the church choir practice that sickened and killed several members in March 2020, and he didn't know what "Pacific Northwest" means.

Yesterday in my vaccine-finding groups, the WebMD piece about COVID-caused E.D. was trending. I mentioned this to him. "I don't care." (I suspect he doesn't understand what "E.D." means.)
He claimed to have had COVID, and "it wasn't that bad." Says he won't get a flu shot either.

Prior to this he'd made a wisecrack pertaining to traffic stops with Black drivers (claiming that they aren't all that dangerous to their health and well-being). He claimed that I could "go ahead" with square dance gigs. By then I'd realized it was pointless to explain to him that a dance gig happens when someone wants to put one on, and hires me to lead it.

Needless to say, I won't be discussing any topics related to suffrage, politics, health and safety, bicycle transportation, home improvements, creative costuming, ecology and sustainability ... and I'll endeavor to stay far away from him.



** People who got their concept of tuba airflow from the book Stop That Ball! rely on these, and require others to use them
 

MD Planner

Cyburbian
Messages
3,124
Points
49
At this point I'd venture to say that most people who truly want to get vaccinated have done so or are in the process. Sure there are some outliers and perhaps some can be convinced with monetary inducements but that's where we are. There's a sizable portion of this country who aren't getting the shot(s) for whatever reasons and rationale they have. That's a fact. So what do we do then? My thought is that people will have to decide what their comfort level is with regard to participating in various activities. Both the vaccinated and the un-vaccinated. It's risk management at that point. We all do it everyday. You drive to work, fly in a plane, go swimming or whatever. There is risk involved and it's going to be up to the individual to determine how much they are willing to endure.

I do think if we as a country would have truly locked down for about 3 weeks last spring it wouldn't have been nearly as bad as it was but it's water under the bridge at this point. For me personally, I'm totally comfortable with attending events and going wherever is open. I had Covid and I've been vaccinated. The vaccine appears to be 100 effective at keeping people out of the hospital with Covid so at some point the un-vaccinated need to decide how much they fear contracting it and perhaps being hospitalized. But that's me and I understand many don't feel like that. Like I said before, if I want to go somewhere and a mask is required, I'll comply with no issue. I'm also happy to get a yearly booster if it's determined that's what is necessary. What amazes me the most is some of the reasons people have for not getting vaccinated. We've got some serious cuckoo for cocoa puffs folks out there.
 

Lowland

Cyburbian
Messages
152
Points
7
Hubby's company has gone with "fully vaccinated persons do not have to wear a mask while indoors". No vaccine verification.

Trust issues?
My office (municipal) updated to this on Monday. We have signs on the doors that say "masks required except if exempted by state order." Within the office, most decided if the state wasn't requiring it then they were done. Myself and a few others keep wearing them intermittently, but we are a very small minority. I put it on when I leave my department or walk in common areas.

Like the common refrain, I haven't been ill in 14 months and it's been great. There are plenty of unvaccinated people that come into our office, and I'd rather be safer for a little while longer. The mask doesn't bother me at all at this point. Outside of work, I see friends and family and have even eaten at a few restaurants (a big step outside my comfort zone at this point).

MD Planner's point about risk management is a talk my partner and I have had a couple of times in the last year. I think it will be that way for the foreseeable future, managing how comfortable you feel doing different activities. I definitely judge locations based on their past adherence to Covid protocols and how they seem to be doing with current ones. There are a few restaurants and bars I'll be avoiding permanently in town now as a result.
 

WSU MUP Student

Cyburbian
Messages
11,254
Points
52
During the pandemic and reduced shopping trips, the lack of no single item from the fridge has been the catalyst for finally going back to the grocery store more so than cheese.
 

Maister

Chairman of the bored
Staff member
Moderator
Messages
30,162
Points
74
I found the best time to go grocery shopping if one must enter inside is when they open at like 7 a.m. Monday mornings at 7 a.m. I would usually be the only customer in the store for the duration of my ~35 minutes of bi-weekly shopping. I think even after covid I will continue the practice of shopping at times when the store is empty. It's so much nicer being able to walk down well-stocked aisles without having to dodge unruly brats, frazzled moms, and clueless folks that leave their carts blocking the middle of the aisle as they hem and haw taking their ever-loving time deliberating over what to buy.
 

WSU MUP Student

Cyburbian
Messages
11,254
Points
52
I found the best time to go grocery shopping if one must enter inside is when they open at like 7 a.m. Monday mornings at 7 a.m. I would usually be the only customer in the store for the duration of my ~35 minutes of bi-weekly shopping. I think even after covid I will continue the practice of shopping at times when the store is empty. It's so much nicer being able to walk down well-stocked aisles without having to dodge unruly brats, frazzled moms, and clueless folks that leave their carts blocking the middle of the aisle as they hem and haw taking their ever-loving time deliberating over what to buy.

Same. I've always preferred going into the grocery store early in the morning but I've now completely avoided stopping by the store in the afternoon or on my way home from work for well over a year and it's been pretty great. After about 7:00 p.m. on Saturdays and Sundays has been pretty good as well.

My one complaint: the Kroger near our house opens at 5:30 or 6:00 a.m. so it's pretty easy to get in there but it's a tiny store with limited selection. I've come to really like the fancy, "specialty" store a mile up the street that is always better stocked and has about 10x the selection at the deli and meat counters but they don't open until 8:00 a.m. I wish they'd open at least 30 minutes earlier because that would make a huge difference. Oh well... at least they almost always have many checkout lanes open and as long as I'm not there on Friday mornings, it doesn't seem too bad.
 

HomerJ

Cyburbian
Messages
1,149
Points
18
Guidance from management is that we are preparing to return to the office some time in August. So far the policy direction on WFH vs. at the office is to not be overly prescriptive across the agency and let department heads ultimately decide what will work best (although working from home is still being labelled a privilege for employees that can be revoked at any time, which I suppose is fair). I'm concerned over the course of time this will become a major headache to manage and that there will be more nudging, first gentle, then forceful, back into the office 8/5.

The compromise many organizations seem to be landing on is being in the office at least 2-3 days out of the week and remote the others, which I have already been doing and am pretty happy with. It's not a perfect way of doing things and there are still a lot of unanswered questions such as shared working spaces, staggered work schedules, employees requesting 100% WFH, and how to accommodate remote attendees for in-person meetings. Still, I want to stay optimistic this is an approach that can probably work for most public sector agencies. Trying to go back to the pre-COVID office rules will be a huge mistake for any agency interested in attracting talented employees.
 

michaelskis

Cyburbian
Messages
20,882
Points
57
Of all the municipalities in the county, we had the shortest durations of WFH. Many of the City Halls are still closed and we been open since October. We have still allowed a lot of flexibility and it is causing some frustration with some staff on how often other staff uses it. However, I do see a point in time where we do not offer WFH anymore for anyone.
 

Maister

Chairman of the bored
Staff member
Moderator
Messages
30,162
Points
74
We're maskless if vaccinated. Those not vaccinated are still required to wear masks. Enforcement, as you might imagine, is problematic at best.
 

gtpeach

Cyburbian
Messages
2,263
Points
25
We didn't have to ask our employees if they're all vaccinated. We have at least one that is outspoken enough to make it clear that they are not going to get vaccinated anytime soon. Which means that our policy will account for that and we'll probably be requiring masks in common spaces in our office for a while still.

I think we're going to continue to offer a hybrid schedule for anyone that wants it, allowing them to WFH up to three days per week or something along those lines. We don't have the need to be as available to the general public, and our staff has done really well working from home throughout the pandemic. Most of our meetings are scheduled ahead of time, so it just seems like we can offer the flexibility to everyone moving forward.
 

Lowland

Cyburbian
Messages
152
Points
7
Trying to go back to the pre-COVID office rules will be a huge mistake for any agency interested in attracting talented employees.
I worry about this with trying to attract employees to fill the wave of retirements we will have in the next two years. We reopened in June, and barring a brief closing in November/December when things got really rough again, we stayed full-time in the office. There were limited to no WFH options presented in the beginning, and disappeared entirely by August. I think the board and management wants normalcy again despite the landscape changing. Who knows, maybe it won't be an issue. But we're attempting to fill our department head role right now and it's just an added worry.
 

Faust_Motel

Cyburbian
Messages
904
Points
34
We are going back fully in-person with no immediate plan to support telework. I agree that this is going to be a challenge for retention and recruiting and more people are going to be looing for this.

One thing that's really interesting about my municipality is that there are very few parents with children living at home who work here- and the rigid policies in place seem to really reinforce that. A planner in the region with another municipality quit their job during the pandemic partially due to the need to balance family needs and work, but I got the impression that some of what was happening was that the municipality was beign really rigid about scheduling.

I think we are headed toward the "no mask required if you are fully vaccinated" policy, which will make those who choose not to be vaccinated really stand out. I worry about the friction that will generate and I worry about what happens when line staff are asked to perform the retail function of the office with an unmasked public- I'm vaccinated and wouldn't have a problem with that, but i could see someone who has chosen not to be vaccinated feeling like they are being asked to take an undue risk (which they have admittedly brought upon themselves by their own choice...)
 
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