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Culturally out-of-step regions

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Buffalo's "different" culture

I know this isn't exactly on topic, but I defintely think that there are some pretty big cultural differences that distinguish Western New York and the rest of the state. My ex-boss in Albany maintains that Western New York isn't even really a part of the Mid-Atlantic states, but really the Mid-West as evidenced by their affinity for "pop", and euchre, and I really don't think that the influence of the Polish/German population in WNY can be understated. I think cities such as Buffalo do have inherit worth if only because they are unique in a way that newer cities never can be.

PS Wurdinski Hotdogs kick a**! :)
 

Dan

Dear Leader
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Buffalo has a distinctly different feel than the rest of Upstate New York; you'll find it in the blue collar ethnic culture and vernacular architecture. I've heard Buffalo equated to "a little Chicago," "a little Detroit that didn't decline as much as the big Detroit," and "just like Cleveland, except there's still bluebloods in the city proper." Just 100 km away in Rochester, that city feels like a different world, like a somewhat older, slightly less prosperous Columbus or Indianapolis. Rochester always seemed more middle-class and less "ethnic" than Buffalo.

There's other cities and towns that seem out-of-step with the state they are in. Northwest Indiana, which doesn't feel a thing like Indiana; Jacksonville, Florida, which is culturally more Georgia-like than Florida-like; and Pueblo, Colorado, which is gritty, industrial, poor and not very "outdoorsy" -- much different than the Front Range metros.

I've always been fascinated by cultural enclaves in larger metropolitan areas, such as Kinloch, Missouri and Eatonville, Florida (African-American enclaves surrounded by affluent, predoiminantly white suburbs), Sheridan, Colorado (a one square mile enclave of heavy industry and lower income whites surrounded by the upper middle class southern suburbs of Denver), the Hyde Park neighborhood in Chicago and Brathenal, Ohio (wealthy white enclaves surrounded by poor African-American communities); and Winter Garden, Florida (a town with a lower income, culturally "deep South" oriented population where most residents are employed in construction of the trades; the surrounding area is mostly middle to upper middle class.)
 
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Greenville, SC - this cool downtown, totally walkable city that has a million great restaurants and is encouraging 2nd story apartments. It is located smack dab in the center of a county that outlawed homosexuality.
 

Chet

Cyburbian Emeritus
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As long as KMateja brought it up,

There's P-Town. A heck of an enclave if there ever was one...
 

jmf

Cyburbian
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OK this is off topic but the mention of Greenville SC leads me to say tell me more.....my significant other travels there for work from time to time. We are actually tentatively planning to go in May. What's on the must do, must eat at list?? Reply off-line if you wish at removed email - pm this person
 
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Cardinal

Cyburbian
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10,080
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LouisvilleSlugger said:
lol. this is what a friend once told me as well whose from there.
At the time I did not remember it exactly, and to be honest, it changes, but most often I hear "72 square miles surrounded by reality."
 

Runner

Cyburbian
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Michael Stumpf said:
Madison, Wisconsin - a few square miles surrounded by reality.
Hmmm, cuturally out-of-step regions.
How about D.C inside the beltway - a few square miles surrounded by persons who actually have to work for a living.
 

H

Cyburbian
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2,850
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off topic

Downtown said:
[B and euchre, [/B]
This is the best card game known to man!!*


*I am so surprised to see it on the post; that I got excited. Sorry.
 

japrovo

Member
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103
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6
Runner said:
Hmmm, cuturally out-of-step regions.
How about D.C inside the beltway - a few square miles surrounded by persons who actually have to work for a living.
When I was growing up on the other side of that line the Beltway used to be the dividing line between the DCs Northern Virginia suburbs and "Real" Virginia. I hear that the line is about 40 miles south around Fredericksburg these days.
 

NoVA

Member
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I would put the "real Virginia" south of Fredericksburg these days. With commuter rail, Fredericksburg is now a bedroom community for DC.

Also, the "real Virginia" has been pushed westward to I-81.

The spread of Northern VA is sad, but at this point I don't think it can be stopped.
 

jresta

Cyburbian
Messages
1,474
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23
Re: Buffalo's "different" culture

Downtown said:
I know this isn't exactly on topic, but I defintely think that there are some pretty big cultural differences that distinguish Western New York and the rest of the state. My ex-boss in Albany maintains that Western New York isn't even really a part of the Mid-Atlantic states, but really the Mid-West as evidenced by their affinity for "pop", and euchre
I went up there for the first time in high school and it just struck me as a great lakes place. Not east coast - north coast.


places that are culturally out of sync - south jersey (more accurately the old colony of west jersey) salem and cumberland counties in particular. It's more like the eastern shore of maryland than it is like any other place in NJ.

the borough of lawnside in camden co. - as i'm sure you all know the FHA wouldn't guarantee mortgages to whites buying in black neighborhoods or vice versa as shameful as that was it probably did a lot to preserve this towns historical character.

"Lawnside, located eight miles southeast of Camden, is the only historically African-American incorporated municipality in the northern United States. It dates to colonial times as a settlement of people of color and has emerged as a viable, modern community."

by the numbers -
area: 1.5 square miles
Pop: 2,692
white: 47
black: 2,520
native american : 27
asian/pacific islander:16
hispanic of any race:64
 

biscuit

Cyburbian
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Re: Buffalo's "different" culture

Downtown said:
...but really the Mid-West as evidenced by their affinity for "pop", and euchre...
So "Pop" is a mid-western thing and not just southwestern PA crazy talk, like "Yinz"? ;)
 

pete-rock

Cyburbian
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1,551
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Can you make a case that Chicagoland is out of sync with the rest of the Midwest? Downstaters, Hoosiers and 'Sconsinites might think so.
 

Jessie-J

Cyburbian
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386
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12
I think Austin is a bit different from the rest of Texas. San Antonio is getting to be more like it in some ways. But it's funny, Austin is actually a really different city than alot of places in the US. Familiar with Burgess Zone Model? Austin is nothing like it. In St. Louis, Dallas, Chicago, you have this HUGE metropolitan area. Austin seems to have stayed relatively the same size (sq. footage), although it's population has more than tripled in the past 10 years.
 

Runner

Cyburbian
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566
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bet on me said:
I think Austin is a bit different from the rest of Texas.
True, but sadly the sprawl around Austin is standard American fair. Down to San Marcos in the south and up to Georgetown in the north it's becoming solid CSD with KB Homes now leading the charge...

The Austin MSA is one of the fastest growing regions in the country. The city may be relatively stable but Travis, Hays, and Williamson counties have been booming. Although with the tech bust this has slowed down.
 

Dan

Dear Leader
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Here's something that's interesting. Today's Web headlines, from several major newspapers across the country.

Orlando Sentinel - SARS cases drops in China
Kansas City Star - Sharon cancels U.S. trip
Denver Post - Desperation at home, danger over the border (story about rural poverty in Mexico)
Chciago Tribune - SBC dials up lesson in clout

Buffalo News - Pope's diagnosis: Parkinson's

I looked at a ton of papers online, and none of 'em mentioned the Pope anywhere. In Buffalo, it's the headline. "What's dat Iraq thing der that everyone talk about der? Isn't dat what dose Italian kits on da Westside drive der?"
 

Jessie-J

Cyburbian
Messages
386
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12
There was a little blip in the St. Louis Post-Dispatch about the Pope's birthday. That's all.
 

giff57

Corn Burning Fool
Staff member
Moderator
Messages
5,403
Points
32
Dan said:
Here's something that's interesting.
Buffalo News - Pope's diagnosis: Parkinson's


Didn't we already know he had Parkinson's? I thought this was old news...guess not.
 

donk

Cyburbian
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6,970
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The Pope's parkinson's was relatively big news here too. (Irish and French Catholic region)
 
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