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Day care and property values

Budgie

Cyburbian
Messages
5,270
Points
30
Is anyone aware of a study that quantifies the impact of daycare facilities in residential areas to property values? I imagine the impact is minimal.
 

Rumpy Tunanator

Cyburbian
Messages
4,473
Points
25
Depending on the type of residential zoning that allows for this type of business (is the whole area residential w/home business allowed that meets certian criteria) or is it residential here, and some commercial there. I don't think it would have a negative impact on property values, unless it create extra traffic, has signage that is inappropiate for the character of the neighborhood, etc. It really depends on the state, local laws, because here, once you get over a certian # of kids being stored at the house, it is no longer classified as a home business.

OT, I saw the Simpsons last night and they were voting on a proposition to get rid of kid stuff. Maybe you need something like that ;)
 

Gedunker

Moderating
Staff member
Moderator
Messages
11,482
Points
41
In-home daycare or daycare centers? In Indiana, there are limits on the number of children that may be kept (I think it is five) in an in-home (and by-right) daycare. Obviously, the lower the intensity, the less impact.
 

Budgie

Cyburbian
Messages
5,270
Points
30
The type I'm talking about have a maximum number of 12 children and operate within single-family neighborhoods as a home occupation. Once you exceed 12 children, the State kicks in with additional requirements and inspections. We have all the regular standards (kids, signage, hours of operation, no outside employees, blah, blah, blah).

Once again, are there any studies out there that measure the enhancement or reduction of property values?
 

H

Cyburbian
Messages
2,850
Points
24
It would lower the value if I were the buyer. I would not buy a home next to a day care. It is not the traffic from a business that would bother me, rather the multi-color swings, slides, fire trucks and kooky signs like “KIDDY KORNER” that would most likely litter the yard. :-|
 

GeogPlanner

Cyburbian
Messages
1,433
Points
25
H said:
It would lower the value if I were the buyer. I would not buy a home next to a day care. It is not the traffic from a business that would bother me, rather the multi-color swings, slides, fire trucks and kooky signs like “KIDDY KORNER” that would most likely litter the yard. :-|
SSCCATAGAPP member?
 

H

Cyburbian
Messages
2,850
Points
24
GeogPlanner said:
SSCCATAGAPP member?
No, I like and want children. I just follow my Grandfather’s attitude that children should be seen and not heard, and they really shouldn’t even be seen that often. :)
 
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Cardinal

Cyburbian
Messages
10,080
Points
34
GeogPlanner said:
SSCCATAGAPP member?
Where do I join? Add me to the list of people who would not like it at the level Budgie's ordinance permits. Twelve is too many kids for a residential area.
 

Gedunker

Moderating
Staff member
Moderator
Messages
11,482
Points
41
Budgie , I was waiting for the new City Council to get moving last night so I took some time to go through our library and found several studies about group homes and property values (almost universally finding no adverse effect) but nothing about day care. I'll keep looking, though.
 

Duke Of Dystopia

Cyburbian
Messages
2,713
Points
24
H said:
No, I like and want children. I just follow my Grandfather’s attitude that children should be seen and not heard, and they really shouldn’t even be seen that often. :)
HE HE! You are missing out on life, OH the ways to torture the young! And they have no clue you are screwing with them.

Take your average 5-8 year old. They are all about rules! Do odd things to them like pronounce Dinosaurs as Sinodaurs. Drives them absolutly bonkers! :) (DAMN NO EVIL GRIN!) Also assigning random names to them!

Gramps time is over though, got to find new ways to torment them rather than ignoring them.

WOW! who would be brave enough to take on 12 kids at a crack with no help?
 

biscuit

Cyburbian
Messages
3,904
Points
25
12 Children and it can still be considered a home business? That seems like a few too many to me. I've heard of 5 or 6 being the limit before it is considered a commercial use and regulated, but never 12.

Whether it actually affects property values or not I would really think twice before buying a home next to a daycare center, or a household with a lot of kids.
 

boiker

Cyburbian
Messages
3,889
Points
26
Yes No 242!

All the way baby..

I am Rudy Giuliani... do what I say!!!
 

el Guapo

Capitalist
Messages
5,995
Points
31
I know two Mormon Familes that have at least 12 kids. Any laws against that yet?
 

Budgie

Cyburbian
Messages
5,270
Points
30
Cardinal said:
Where do I join? Add me to the list of people who would not like it at the level Budgie's ordinance permits. Twelve is too many kids for a residential area.
If I put up a basketball rim and a tether ball court in my backyard, how many kids would it attract daily. Better yet, how about a tramboline. I have three kids, each of which have several friends. Our house has always been open to visitors and it's not unusual to have 10 kids in our yards at once.

I don't disagree that child day cares likely reduce property values, but to what extent?

Once again, are there any studies out there.
 

Budgie

Cyburbian
Messages
5,270
Points
30
biscuit said:
12 Children and it can still be considered a home business? That seems like a few too many to me. I've heard of 5 or 6 being the limit before it is considered a commercial use and regulated, but never 12.
I don't disagree, but thems the rules in these here parts (I've been here all of 1 month). 12 is also a threshold for increased inspections by the State, so the local ordinance is mirroring state law. Of course we can be more stringent, but I've been here for a whole month. Also of note, is that very few of those allowed to have 12, actually operate at that level. Most of the time it's only half that at any given time.
 

BKM

Cyburbian
Messages
6,463
Points
29
When I was going up in the Backwoods of Suburban Indiann (tm), my dad never really got his act together. So-my mother operated an illegal, unlicensed day-care facility in our family home for years. I remember at some points we had 20 children running around the property. We ate in shifts.

As "horrible" as this was, my mom's service filled a need that could never be met by the licensed, insured, compliant facilities-because these latter facilities are EXPENSIVE. My mother's clients were often single mothers-waitresses, store clerks, and the like.

The one mitigating factor-my parent's neighborhood had pretty big lots (1/4 acres plus). So, there was less pressure on the neighbors.
 

NHPlanner

A shadow of my former self
Staff member
Moderator
Messages
9,945
Points
40
BKM said:
The one mitigating factor-my parent's neighborhood had pretty big lots (1/4 acres plus). So, there was less pressure on the neighbors.
Talk about perception being relative...in the community I work for 1/4 acre lots would be considered TINY. :)
 

BKM

Cyburbian
Messages
6,463
Points
29
? How do you define / describe these people?
No "definition" per se, but:

"Can you cover so-and-so's counter day, he has to go home because little jimmy has yet another case of the sniffles."

"We can't allow that kind of apartment project here. We need to build houses for families instead."

"You should't complain that you don't get huge tax write-offs for children. After all, it costs a lot of money to raise the children that I chose to have."

(All in fun folks. I LIKE other peoples' kids
 

Dan

Dear Leader
Staff member
Moderator
Messages
18,696
Points
69
H said:
I would not buy a home next to a day care. It is not the traffic from a business that would bother me, rather the multi-color swings, slides, fire trucks and kooky signs like “KIDDY KORNER” that would most likely litter the yard. :-|
I feel the same way. Bed and Breakfast inns have to jump through all sorts of hoops to operate in an established residential area, and blend in as much as possible to the neighborhood. Day care centers in homes often have fenced front yards, colorful playground equipment in the front yard, and cheap hand-painted signs. Occasionally, the house will be painted a bright primary color. Review required? Ha! Its a use allowed by right, overriding local zoning restrictions, under most state laws.
 

Cardinal

Cyburbian
Messages
10,080
Points
34
Budgie said:
If I put up a basketball rim and a tether ball court in my backyard, how many kids would it attract daily. Better yet, how about a tramboline. I have three kids, each of which have several friends. Our house has always been open to visitors and it's not unusual to have 10 kids in our yards at once.

I don't disagree that child day cares likely reduce property values, but to what extent?

Once again, are there any studies out there.
I see your point, which is one of the reasons I choose to live in the country. The quarter mile between me and my neighbors is just far enough that they don't bother me, and still close enough for me to be able to pick them off with a .30-cal.
 
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