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De Noc

Bear Up North

Cyburbian Emeritus
Messages
9,323
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31
Projects

Any faithful reader who wandered through my last post should know that my waterfront project work is going to take considerable time and effort. Just to clue you in on my work ("attack") methods over the many years.....

Very seldom do I finish a project at first blush. I may have a specific De Noc project that I have estimated will take 20 hours. In that example I would usually slide-in about 75% of the alotted time and then move on to a different project.

Later in the year (or whenever) I will get back to the original project. Because it is just a hobby and not a vocation I have the luxury of working on what I feel like. Lately, waterfront development has tripped my De Noc trigger.

Thus.....after spending a ton of billable hours on the waterfront projects, I am going to let that set for awhile. This week I plan to take a vacation day (probably Thursday) and will plop my "Bear" butt :-c;) in front of the DVD player, pop in some old flicks, and work on.....

You pick'em.....

De Noc Transit System (DNTS) relationship between stations and neighborhood (retail, housing, etc.)

Camp Seven (A northern metro suburb, in process....a fast-growing township is going to become a city)

Downtown Movie Theaters (I still have a batch of movie theaters in the CBD.....even with a still-vibrant downtown, I have way too many.....1960s leftover)

Strip Center Store Roster (I haven't worked in awhile on the roster of stores that populate my strip centers. So much has changed in the last year or so in regards to retail.)

Manufacturing Plant Update (This is the project I am leaning toward. So many manufacturing consolidations, etc. are changing the face of my Great Lakes' metro.)
_____

Pencils Are Now Sharp Bear
 

Bear Up North

Cyburbian Emeritus
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Retail Changes

Last night, as the cold late winter winds blew across northwestern Ohio, this Bear worked on some major changes to retail in the De Noc metropolitan area. I had been thinking about these changes for a while.....time to get this project finished.

A few years ago, in the real world, Federated Stores purchased Marshall Field's. Eventually, that deal led to the end of the famous Marhsall Field moniker, replaced by the equally-famous Macy's. In Metro De Noc (circa 1970s) there were 6 Macy's stores and 3 Marshall Field stores. Because of this consolidation, the recent closing of 2 local malls, and changing habits of consumers, De Noc now has just 5 Macy's Department Stores.

Another example of changing habits.....in the early 1970s the area supported 11 Sear's Department Stores. That number has dwindled to just 6 stores. In fact, department store retail in the metro has followed national patterns. In 1970 the metro had 63 department stores and 14 discount department stores. By the beginning of 2008 the area totals were 37 department stores and 62 discount department stores.

Another facet of these changes.....the regional department store allignments. Royal Straits Department Stores had 8 facilities in the 1970s. They now only have 3 stores and the suburban store in Cinderdale (an inner-ring suburb) is "on the bubble". Diplomat's was originally 6 big stores in the metro, now down to 3. The Tiger Store, no longer a regional store but rather owned by a consortium, went from 10 stores to 6 stores. The Spartan Department Stores, with 3 locations in the metro, are closing.
_____

Last night I signed the death papers for 2 of my long-term shopping malls. After much deliberation, I shuttered one of the two downtown De Noc malls, knowing full-well that my quite-successful CBD still wasn't good enough to support a pair of 80-plus store malls.

North Star Mall, in the southern portion of the CBD, was closed. NSM had two anchor stores, a Marshall Fields (see above) and a Kohl's. I will be considering a move of the downtown Kohl's store to another empty building, because Kohl's has done well in the CBD. (High daytime population coupled with large resident population.) NSM was directly adjacent-to a Royal Straits Department Store and a Macy's Department Store. Both of those will remain open. NSM also meant the end....at least for now.....of the CBD's Harley-Davidson (Clothing) Store. I am considering a Harley-Davidson (Clothing) Store in the northern metro, at a point where a scenic north woods highway moves into developed retail corridor area. (Location, location, location!)

Downtown mall shopping is now limited to 81-store Towne Center.

Slater Mall, in the northern inner-ring suburb of Slater, was also closed. This 61-store mall was built way too close (2 miles) to another similar-sized center, Brookley Mall. The three anchor stores were obvious "fits" for closure (see above).....Marshall Field's, Sear's, and Royal Straits. This mall closure also meant the end of Slater Cinema I & II, a pair of the original (not theater-seating) moviehouses built away from downtown De Noc.
_____

Very-limited pencil work involved with these changes. Most of the work is detail-oriented.....updating store rosters for malls, deleting specific spread-sheet info, changing all of the small locational charts for all of the 161 stores (plus anchors) that were affected.

These few hours of labor results in a retail scene that is a tad bit more realistic.

Bear
 

Bear Up North

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9,323
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31
High School Changes

Back in the 1990s I worked on a major De Noc project.....changing of boundaries for the city's school district. That project led to a reduction in the number of high schools and placement of boundary lines for each school (on a secondary map). The 3-day weekend is giving me the opportunity to re-visit that project and make some other changes, including taking a long, hard look at possible closing of some schools.

Even though De Noc, not fully "bottled" in by other suburbs, continues to grow in population, the fact is that the high school age student population is shrinking, primarily due to family size shrinkage. The possible closing of some high schools has some consequences, though. Here's what's going on.....

Metropolitan De Noc has 118 high schools, of various sizes and affiliations. 29 high schools are in the City of De Noc Public School District. 12 high schools, spread throughout the metro, are Catholic institutions. 3 of the high schools are Christian. The other 74 public high schools are in all of the surrounding communities.

My weekend project work just involves the De Noc District. The first step in the project was to take a look at the obvious.....the district has 3 different vocational high schools. (Vocational high schools were a big deal in the 1940s through 1960s.)

Vocational High, near the central business district, was built in 1941 and peaked at 850 students. Belvedere Vocational High, in the western part of De Noc, was built in 1952 and peaked at 2034 students. Valiton Vocational High, in the eastern part of De Noc, was built in 1954 and peaked at 650 students. Today, with a 40% reduction in vocational students, having 3 vocational high schools is a district money drain.

My problem is deciding which 2 schools to shutter. The oldest school (the most obvious?) is the most centrally-located, and accessible via great transit service. If I keep one of the outlying schools open, an addition is certainly required. The problem with an outlying school is the long travel distance across the metro....up to a 12-mile bus trip.

What to do?
_____

My evaluation also shows that a pair of high school districts have very large geographic areas, no doubt related to lot sizes increasing as one moves from the center of De Noc. The Woodville High district can result in an 8-mile commute for some students, in an area that is not readily-accessible to transit. The Roosevelt High district is smaller in square miles but it meanders around Orange Lake, creating longer commutes (to access bridges, etc.).

So, as I start to evaluate the possible closing of some schools, I have to consider the logistical aspects, including transit service versus commute length, the age of the building and the neighborhood growth patterns.

Woodville and Roosevelt are also the schools most likely to require district-provided bus service, a service not necessary in most of the other city districts, due to transit availability. Should I be thinking about bus garages near those schools, to ease gasoline costs?
_____

Eventually, I will have to look at increasing the regional cooperation relative to the suburban school districts. Metropolitan De Noc mirrors many similar-sized metros, with many school districts (of varying sizes), all with their own bus fleets, etc. Consolidation of some districts and the closing of some suburban high schools will probably be the end result.

Such is life, on a De Noc scale. Back to work.....

Bear

EDIT: Forgot to tell you how I arrive at the numbers.....

Every plat (square mile) has a total population, arrived at when I draw the plat, based on counting the housing units. To determine the high school population numbers I make some numerical formula adjustments based on whether or not the district's plats are adult-predominant or primarily families with school age children. I also look at the physical and demographic characteristics of the plats (apartment dwellings predominant, senior citizen housing areas, etc.). Using the combined formulas I arrive at a logical number for the student populaton of a district.
 
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JNA

Cyburbian Plus
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DetroitPlanner

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Might as well follow what has happened thoughout Michigan. Don't close any public schools. Open charter schools that will suck money away from the Public Schools and close most of the Catholic ones.

Keep doing it for 10 years, then wonder aloud 'why can't Johnny read?'
 

Bear Up North

Cyburbian Emeritus
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Financial Institutions Consolidation

Like any other major metro area, De Noc has been, over the years, home to many banks, savings and loan associations, credit unions, etc. To bring more realism into my fake community I have embarked on a financial institution consolidation project. To give you a feel for the metro, here is a list of financial insitutions that have grown with my metro (since 1965).....

Star Bank & Trust (59 branches, including branches in 23 suburbs).
De Noc Trust (35 branches, including branches in 17 suburbs).
Northern Michigan Citizen's Bank (25 branches, including branches in 11 suburbs).
Lake County National Bank (25 branches, including branches in 13 suburbs).
New Noc National Bank (23 branches, including branches in 12 suburbs).
Southwestern Straits Savings & Loan (19 branches, including branches in 11 suburbs).
Suburban Bank & Trust (14 suburban branches).

Smaller financial institutions, with just a few branches for each, include.....

Family Savings Bank (4)
Joland Savings Bank (3)
Superior Bank & Trust (4)
Alaska House National Bank (5)

There are also a number of credit unions in the metro area.

In the real world, many of these homegrown financial institutions would have been acquired by the "big boys", such as Bank of America, Huntington Bancshares, Key Bank, 5/3 Bank, etc. For this project I will be researching geographical growth pattens relative to financial institution acquisitions and proceed accordingly.

The impact on the metro would certainly include the closing of duplicate branches, growth strategies for metro coverage for any "newbies" to the area, and the possibility that a couple of the downtown De Noc skyscrapers could lose their major tenants.

Pushing toward realism.

Bear With Money Clip
 

mgk920

Cyburbian
Messages
4,201
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26
Speaking of that, what did the State of Northern Michigan decide on using as the design for their state quarter?

^o)

Mike
 

Bear Up North

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^^^^^^^^

mgk920.....Not sure how to answer. I have not paid much attention to the designs the other states picked. A pine tree would be appropriate but methinks some other state (bums) would use that design. A snowmobile would also be good. ;-)

Picture below is from a scan of my Excel Spread that shows Metropolitan De Noc. As the metro grew, inner-ring suburbs were later surrounded by what would become middle-ring suburbs. Outer-ring suburbs joined the party as the years progressed. Just like a real metro. :-D

Bear
 

Attachments

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    Metro De Noc.jpg
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mgk920

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^^^^^^^^

mgk920.....Not sure how to answer. I have not paid much attention to the designs the other states picked. A pine tree would be appropriate but methinks some other state (bums) would use that design. A snowmobile would also be good. ;-)

Bear
Well, let's help out BUN with a little 'friendly' design competition for the Northern Michigan state quarter. Any ideas?

Mike
 

illinoisplanner

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5,334
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25
^^^^^^^^

mgk920.....Not sure how to answer. I have not paid much attention to the designs the other states picked. A pine tree would be appropriate but methinks some other state (bums) would use that design. A snowmobile would also be good. ;-)

Picture below is from a scan of my Excel Spread that shows Metropolitan De Noc. As the metro grew, inner-ring suburbs were later surrounded by what would become middle-ring suburbs. Outer-ring suburbs joined the party as the years progressed. Just like a real metro. :-D

Bear

Wow, that's a pretty cool map, Bear. I wish I could read the text though.

As far as the state quarter, you could perhaps include a bunch of things. You can have the De Noc skyline in the center with maybe a fish jumping out of water on one side and a deer peering behind a tree on the other?
 

Bear Up North

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Wow, that's a pretty cool map, Bear. I wish I could read the text SNIP SNIP SNIP

illinoisplanner.....I am not pleased with how it turned-out. I am not much of a whiz when it comes to pics and scans and all that stuff, so I can't figure out how to make the scan bigger, so the text can be read.

Plannerfolk could at the very least make an assumption that Metro De Noc has one hexx of a lot of suburbs. Even with the lousy resolution you can see that the corporate limits of De Noc are not "boxed-in" in some areas of the metro.

For a reference on just how big De Noc would be with all the plats laid-out on a gymnasium floor, look at the suburb in blue in the lower left hand corner. That suburb is Bailey Creek. Bailey Creek has six plats (drawings). Those six plats are the drawings that were placed on the grass at the FIRST STANFEST, in Kalamazoo, at Bell's Brewery & Stangatheringplace. (See archives in gallery.)
_____

mgk920 and DetroitPlanner.....Interesting state quarter ideas. How about Frosty the Snowman holding a beer and standing in front of a Shopko? ;)

Bear
 

illinoisplanner

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5,334
Points
25
illinoisplanner.....I am not pleased with how it turned-out. I am not much of a whiz when it comes to pics and scans and all that stuff, so I can't figure out how to make the scan bigger, so the text can be read.

Plannerfolk could at the very least make an assumption that Metro De Noc has one hexx of a lot of suburbs. Even with the lousy resolution you can see that the corporate limits of De Noc are not "boxed-in" in some areas of the metro.

For a reference on just how big De Noc would be with all the plats laid-out on a gymnasium floor, look at the suburb in blue in the lower left hand corner. That suburb is Bailey Creek. Bailey Creek has six plats (drawings). Those six plats are the drawings that were placed on the grass at the FIRST STANFEST, in Kalamazoo, at Bell's Brewery & Stangatheringplace. (See archives in gallery.)

Bear

Wow, that's pretty big.:-o For comparison, my city is about 30-40 plats, or probably about the size of the four suburbs in the southwest corner of your DeNoc map put together.
 

Bear Up North

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Another Try

Let's give it a different approach. Uploading the actual Excel file that has the De Noc Metropolitan map on it. Obviously, the scan converted to a jpeg was just not big enough.

Bear
 

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Bear Up North

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The Whitefish Causeway

Back in 2004, on this thread, mgk920 suggested that in a real world there would be discussions.....and probably action......on an island-hopping causeway that would connect Northern Michigan's Garden Peninsula with Wisconsin's Door Peninsula. I finally found some time to do a little research on the feasability of such a project. It could happen!

Such a project would dramatically change the growth patterns in metro De Noc. There would be a huge increase in suburbs and growth in the southeastern portion of the metro, just 25 miles from the northernmost point of this proposed highway. The Garden Peninsula would probably be filled with exurban subdivisions. mgk920 also suggested that the highway would be an extension of I-43, from Green Bay, WI. That would change my contention that I-43 would continue north from Green Bay to Marquette, Northern Michigan.....with I-98 junctioning with I-43 to the west of metro De Noc.

My working title for this project is The Whitefish Causeway, chosen because of the geological name of the underwater channel between Green Bay and the main body of Lake Michigan. The abundance of whitefish in this area is another good reason for the naming choice. Let's take a tour, from north to south.....

The Whitefish Causeway
I-43 would exit the southeastern suburbs of De Noc, probably from the suburb of Germaine Spring. The highway would move south, down the Garden Peninsula, for a land distance of 25 miles. The actual causeway, with tolls (of course) would begin near the southwest tip of the Garden Peninsula. The first bridge would route (3/4 mile bridge) almost due west to Little Summer Island. From there it would route to the southeast and cross 2 miles of water to Summer Island. Summer Island would have 3 miles of interstate, including an interchange.

The Tunnel
I have determined that the one-and-one-half mile crossing to Poverty Island would be a tunnel. This decision is based on water depth and the flow of lake freighter traffic to De Noc. Also using the same logic that was used in Chesapeake Bay.....have a tunnel, in case of war.

Back To The Causeway...
The next routing would be almost 5 miles, to St. Martin Island. There would be an interchange on this island....and a Northern Michigan Welcome Center for the northbound lanes. After being on land for a couple of miles I-43 would swing southwest and cross 5 miles of lake to the first island in Wisconsin, Rock Island. The causeway between St. Martin Island and Rock Island would include an elevated portion that would allow tall-masted sailboats the necessary clearance. If Rock Island was still a state park, there would be no interchange. The land-based interstate on this island would be just under two miles.

The next bridge would be for a half mile, to Washington Island, a large isle. There would be an interchange on this island and the southbound lanes would have a Wisconsin Welcome Center. The bridge between Rock Island and Washington Island would be super-elevated, to allow lake freighter access. The Whitefish Channel is the geological feature under this bridge.

After six miles on Washington Island the routing would be southwest, crossing one-half mile to Detroit Island. The center of this span would have some elevation for sailboats. After about a mile of land-based expressway, the routing would be almost due west, across another 2 miles of water, to Plum Island. With just a short jaunt of land-based interstate, I-43 would make the final water crossing with a 2-mile bridge that would grab the Door Peninsula just north of Northport, WI. This crossing would have an elevated portion for sailboats.

Green Bay, WI, is about 88 miles southwest of Northport, WI. The toll booths for northbound traffic would be at Northport.

Logistics/Comparisons
Even though the climate can certainly be severe, this type of bridge is common in cold-weather locales. The depths are similar (for the most part) to the Chesapeake Bay Bridge & Tunnel. The funding could certainly happen, based on what we have seen in infrastructure monies (and assuming that the construction time frame was shortly after Chesapeake Bay).
_____

Because my metro is fictional (but reality-based) are there any reasons I should not consider this? And if I do.....I have some major work to do with my southeast suburbs. :-c

.....and almost all of my 50-some spreadsheets. :-c:-c

Bear
 

mgk920

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As a clarification, under such a scenario 'I-43' would run generally southward along present-day WI 42 from about Sturgeon Bay, WI to the Manitowoc, WI area, where it would continue southward roughly along I-43's current route. Spur routes would be built along present-day WI 57 between Green Bay and Sturgeon Bay (an aside, WisDOT is right now upgrading that part of WI 57 to four lanes) as well as along present-day I-43 between Green Bay and Manitowoc.

To say that that 'I-43' would be a busy tourist and commercial corridor is putting it mildly, it would likely require at least six lanes the whole way.

Mike
 

Bear Up North

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Superior Research Park

Some information on a major research park in Metropolitan De Noc.....

Recognizing a need to provide a solid foundation for research, especially in the field of plastics/polymers, a group of government officials, members of the research and scientific community, education leaders, and influential corporations developed Superior Research Park. Now in its' 10th year, the southeastern metro center includes 12 research-oriented corporations, employing more than 1000 people. Superior Research Park is presently occupying more than 1450 acres within corporate limits of De Noc and the suburb of St. Jaques. As the park continues to expand it will include future acreage in the suburbs of Lakeview and Poplar Pointe.

Let's Take A Tour
The westernmost portion of Superior Research Park is located on the campus of Patrick Stanley University. This large university includes the prestigious College of Plastics Research. The College's Northern Michigan Plastic Research Center has its' headquarters in the designated Superior Research Park acreage on campus, operating from 3 separate technical and classroom buildings.

A mile to the east the actual main portion of Superior Research Park begins. Companies in the area adjacent to Bywater Pike include Superior-Morton (defense research), Holstrom (defense research), Reyz Laboratories (medical research), and Bose Labs (electronics research). The next parcel, along 21st Century Drive, includes Skandia (defense research), Laramie (plastics research), Falk Testing (testing laboratories), and the United States EPA De Noc Testing Laboratory.

Parcels between North Boundary Road and South Boundary Road include Kinetic (multi-faceted research), Kendall Research (plastics research), Tracy-Moloch Solar Technology and JNA Research (multi-faceted research).

The park's parcels also include some restaurants and some lodging, specifically located on-site to serve the park's employees and visitors.

Just north of Superior Research Park is the large (almost 700 acres) Homeland Industrial Park. That park counts as its' tenants some companies that do contract work for companies located in Superior Research Park.

On To The Future
Superior Research Park officials are close to a decision on an agreement with the Lake Superior Cancer Research Center (located in the western suburb of Katie Shores). That agreement would recognize and promote medical research, through partnerships between the Cancer Center and potential new medical research corporations at Superior Research Park.

The park is also promoting its' sites to De Noc's major plastics-oriented corporations as opportunities for further local expansion. Michigan Plastics Corporation, with seven plants in southwestern De Noc, is considering the park as the new home for their research center and is considering the park for a new world headquarters building. Michigan Plastics is one of the area's largest employers, with almost 3000 employees.
_____

Hope you enjoyed your tour.

Bear
 

Bear Up North

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DNTS Park & Ride: Need Your Help !

Greetings to my Cyburbian friends! I have an issue and you may be able to provide me with a little direction. Here's the deal.....

As mentioned in previous posts on this thread, Metropolitan De Noc is served by the huge De Noc Transit System (DNTS) monorail lines. The system has over 100 miles of Alweg monorail and now more than 60 stations. As I have continued to draw my large metro I have only recently been adding-in "Park & Ride" stations for the DNTS. Many of the older stations, including stations in inner-ring suburbs, do not have the "Park & Ride" feature. These stations only have the "Stop & Drop" lanes in the front of the stations.....sometimes called "Kiss & Ride".

One of my major projects is to develop a logical number of "Park & Ride" stations. Doing a review of some other large systems in the USA I have (tentatively) concluded that the central core of a city will not have any "P & R"s......and the number of "P & R"s will gradually increase as you move farther away from the central business district.

Any of you transit geeks......or those who live in transit-oriented towns.....have a feel for the number, location, demographics, etc. of "Park & Ride" stations? Should I limit those types of stations to locales close-to or adjacent-to major highways?

For implementation purposes, I am looking for "real world" scenarios, not necessarily "best practices". There is an assumption with De Noc that, for the most part, it has morphed-along just like any other major metro. (Of course, your comments about "best practices" would be fun to read.)

As always, I will greatly appreciate your comments.

Bear
 

Otis

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5,170
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FWIW, relative to my experience with the DC Metro system. On the Orange line, which runs to the western suburbs of DC, Arlington County (close in suburb) elected to have no P&Rs. They went for intensive development at the stations. Fairfax County, on the other hand, being further out, went for all P&Rs. But the Orange line paralells (and in Fairfax County is in the median of) I-66, a main highway into DC. The Blue line pretty much follows thatb pattern relative to Arlington and Fairfax policies.
 

DetroitPlanner

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We are building a Park and Ride as park of a giant reworking of I-75 at the Ambassador Bridge. It will be located near the international welcome center/mercado (I can just see the Canadians now stopping there and thinking 'what the heck, I'm in Mexico already?').

Not all jobs are located in central cities, so this makes sense for those who will commute from Mexicantown to jobs elsewhere. Most interesting is that park and ride lots, be that for rideshare or transit in the region are now at capacity. Funny how $4+ gas changes folks commutes.

A question of a different sort on de Noc, over the weekend I crossed the Big Mac, have you put a signature bridge in de Noc?
 

mgk920

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4,201
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We are building a Park and Ride as park of a giant reworking of I-75 at the Ambassador Bridge. It will be located near the international welcome center/mercado (I can just see the Canadians now stopping there and thinking 'what the heck, I'm in Mexico already?').

Not all jobs are located in central cities, so this makes sense for those who will commute from Mexicantown to jobs elsewhere. Most interesting is that park and ride lots, be that for rideshare or transit in the region are now at capacity. Funny how $4+ gas changes folks commutes.

A question of a different sort on de Noc, over the weekend I crossed the Big Mac, have you put a signature bridge in de Noc?
I'm thinking that the De Noc signature bridge is the I-43 crossing between the Garden Peninsula and Door County.

Mike
 

DetroitPlanner

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I'm thinking that the De Noc signature bridge is the I-43 crossing between the Garden Peninsula and Door County.

Mike

hmm must have missed that one! That would do it. I was thinking of one the other way from Fayette to Pennisula Point.
 

Bear Up North

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Signature Bridge

mgk920.....You are correct, the signature bridge would be The Whitefish Causeway, detailed in a previous post in this thread. The super-elevated portion between Rock Island and Washington Island would be the most photogenic. This high span, elevated so freighters could pass underneath, is in Wisconsin, about 45 miles south of Metropolitan De Noc.

Metropolitan De Noc is sculpted with many inland lakes and streams, but there are no major bridges. The longest bridges would be the twin spans for the Southgate Expressway, in the southeastern portion of corporate limit De Noc. Those spans cross a portion of Orange Lake and are about 1000-feet in length. Nothing "signature" about these spans.....typical expressway bridge built high enough so tall-masted pleasure sailboats could glide under.

The Southgate Expressway (in this area) was drawn by this Bear in the late 1960s. If I was developing this area now I would blend-in realism, and this double-span would not be built. (Quite frankly.....I would bet dollars to donuts that many localities in the real world have built bridges that they shouldn't have.)

One of my projects on THE BIG LIST is to develop a list of all of the metro bridges. But, alas.....no "signatures" will adorn that list.

Bear

EDIT: As I closed this post I had an interesting thought.....Chicago's Skyway is certainly a sig bridge. It is not crossing any major river or body of water, but it does cross-over a dazzling display of industrial might. Hmmmmm.......
 
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Bear Up North

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Orange Lake & Lake St. Paul

Time to share some information about two of the larger lakes in the De Noc Metropolitan Area.....Orange Lake & Lake St. Paul

Basins
In the metro I have identified eight separate watershed basins, identifiable because of relatively similar elevations above sea level. The Orange Basin includes Wayside Lake, Orange Lake, and Lake St. Paul, all at 604-feet above sea level. Spring-fed Wayside Lake is a small body of water, almost bay-like, so it is not included in this exercise, although its' waters flow into the main portion of the Orange Basin.

The Setting
The lakes are located in the east south central portion of the metro, creating a body of water (9576 acres) that is nearly 7 miles north-south and, at the northern portion, extends eastward almost 6 miles. There is a narrows between Orange Lake and Lake St. Paul.....a narrows crossed by one of the four main bridges in the basin.

When viewed from the air it is obvious that the lakes are in the middle of an urban setting, with the western shore of Orange Lake only one mile from the skyscrapers of the De Noc central business district. Although the two lakes are often compared to Minnesota's Lake Minnetonka (albiet smaller.....Minnetonka has 14,000 acres) the density of the housing surrounding the lakes, the intense commercialization around the lakes, and the huge industrial areas to the east of the lakes visibly set it apart from it's Minnesota cousin. The population within one mile of the lake is 155,255, a statement of the density of the housing stock in the basin.

Most of the lake is within the corporate limits of De Noc. A small portion of Lake St. Paul grabs some of the northeastern inner-ring suburb of Mohawk Park and a small portion of Orange Lake includes village limits of the inner-ring suburb of Orangewood, in the southern metro.

The deepest spot in the two lakes is near the center of Lake St. Paul, at 85-feet. The fish population includes yellow perch, walleye, northern pike, sunfish, largemouth bass, and muskie. The lake has many public access points, for boaters and those who enjoy the lake from parks, beaches, and fishing piers.

Inflows include Wayside Creek, the Grand River, King Creek, and Orange Creek. The primary outflow is East Creek. The two lakes have almost 100 miles of shoreline, with many bays and arms. Water quality has improved in the last few decades, thanks to tougher polution controls and a massive storm-sewer project.

The Orange Basin is the only metro watershed basin to have access to Lake Michigan. That access is through a series of recreational locks, using East Creek, Church Key Creek, and the Little Fishdam River. Five Yacht Clubs are located on the two lakes. Five large parks (with beaches), a small beach only facility, and a small Forest Preserve (total of 1010 acres) are somewhat evenly-spaced around the lakes, providing numerous recreational opportunities for those who live on and near the basin. Portions of the metro's longest bike trail hugs some of the eastern shoreline and two golf courses have lakefront locations. Both lakes are havens for ice-fishing, with a shanty-town season that runs from mid-December to mid-March.

Around The Lakes
Let's take a tour around the lakes, beginning in the southeastern corner of Orange Lake. Dearborn Park & Beach (300 acres) is in that corner, at the Orange Creek inflow. Moving west, we pass prime lakefront property that is still in use as a 100 acre apple orchard. The Village of Orangewood is next, with its' small CBD occupying the southwestern corner of Orange Lake.

Moving north, we cross the Wayside Creek inflow and see the Southern Keys Causeway. A number of small islands at the lower end of the lake have been called "The Southern Keys" for years and the island-hopping causeway, with small bridges between each isle, provides access across the lake. Sibley Boulevard is about a mile north of the causeway. The Sibley Bridge (1100-feet) crosses a narrow portion of the lake, providing additional access to each shore. The SK Causeway has a small drawbridge for larger recreational boats. The Sibley Bridge is tall enough to allow sailboat access. Looking north from the Sibley Bridge you can see the high-speed DNTS monorail tracks.....the Orange Line.

Continuing north (on the western shore of Orange Lake) we pass the now-closed Sky King Airport. That small facility, with prime lakefront property, has been identified as a key component in the De Noc Regional Waterfront Partnership (DNRWP). Just to the north, the Orange Lake Municipal Golf Course. The 18-hole course includes six holes adjacent to the lake. From the course, players can see the tall bridges of the New Noc Expressway, another bridge crossing a narrow point on the meandering lake.

The Grand River (spring-fed) inflow is north of the expressway bridges.....another area identified in the DNRWP (possible new park). North of here are some of the largest homes on the two lakes, colonial-style mansions, built nearly 100 years ago, with a sunrise view. Ripple Park & Beach (350 acres) and Northwood Beach (6 acres) are at the northwestern corner of Orange Lake. Another DNRWP component is in this area, a project that would create a small recreational boat lock to link the Orange Basin with the Green Basin.

The Orange Road Bridge, with a drawbridge, provides an obvious separation between Orange Lake and Lake St. Paul. Moving along the north shore of Lake St. Paul we see high-density housing, directly adjacent to the lake. In this area, the lakefront footage is very minimal. Housing stock around Lake St. Paul is almost all from the years 1900 to 1930. The shore here includes St. Paul Park & Beach, a park that has a grand old WPA-built pavilion.

The northeastern corner of Lake St. Paul is markedly different.....larger housing stock and five high-rise apartment towers are part of the city of Mohawk Park. At the King Creek inflow there is another DNRWP component, a plan to extend an area bike trail to the lakeshore, to provide lake access to bikers.

The southern shore of Lake St. Paul includes more high-density housing, East Harbor Park & Beach (90 acres), Eastwood Park & Beach (150 acres), and the Indian River Forest Preserve.....a small (50 acres) wooded jewel in the middle of a very dense urban area. This area also includes the primary outflow, East Creek. East Creek Muncipal Golf Course is here, with its' gently rolling hills and 6475-feet of fairways and greens.

The eastern shore of Orange Lake has a large number of large, 1950s-era, apartment complexes, including the huge Clearwater Arms development. To the south of Clearwater Arms is the now-closed De Noc Motor Speedway, a small motor-sports race track. The track has been idle for a number of years as developers continue to investigate various proposals for the waterfront property.

Just north of our starting point for this trip around the lakes is the only factory that actually is on the lakeshore. Schrimpton Sailboats, Inc., a family-owned facility, employs 125 people, manufacturing small wood, fiberglass, and plastic sailboats.

Bear's History Book
All of the 32 different plats (drawings) for the Orange Lake and Lake St. Paul area were developed in the 1960s. Plat 14 (Southern Keys) probably has a drawn-on date of about 1965. Plat 137, the final De Noc plat for these lakes, was probably completed in the late 1960s. Inner-ring suburbs Orangewood and Mohawk Park were also both products of that era.

As I have (somewhat) matured I know that a redraw would eliminate the island-hopping causeway.....but I am not sure that anything else would be changed. The density issue, oft-mentioned in this post, is (IMO) quite realistic for an urban setting so close to a major city's CBD.
_____

See you at the beach!

Bear :)
 

Bear Up North

Cyburbian Emeritus
Messages
9,323
Points
31
Summer 2008 Project

Those who browsed my posts in the "what the heck you doing this weekend?' thread know that many a Sunday afternoon was spent (this summer of 2008) working on De Noc (to a background of old movies). Some details follow.....

The Plats, The Location
I have been working on De Noc plats 246 thru 258. These are plats within the corporate limits of De Noc, in the northeastern part of the city. Looking at a metro map, this area appears as a long and skinny "finger", surrounded by primarily middle ring and outer ring suburbs. North of the De Noc plats being drawn are the suburbs of Camp Seven, Francis, and Frying Pan Lake. Suburbs to the south of these drawings include inner ring Cinderdale along with Moss Lake and City of Industry. The area is gently rolling, includes a small portion of the actual Frying Pan Lake and that lake has a stream that cuts through this area, North Creek, as it meanders to Green Lake.

The 13 plats will ring in with a population between 10,000 and 15,000. As I finish this project I will be doing the physical count of dwellings and adding all of the demographic details to my collection of speadsheets. Because of their near suburban location, lot sizes are bigger and I expect most plats to be in the 1000 person population range.

Transit
The De Noc Transit System (DNTS) Green Line goes thru the area. I have included a pair of Park & Ride Stations, logical because of their locations relatively close to the Metropolitan Parkway - East (I-298). The Webster Corners Station is on Camp Seven Highway and the Northeast De Noc Station is on White Pine Avenue.

The east-west Green Line can take commuters about 11 miles west, to a junction with the Blue Line......and that junction (near the State Capitol) is just a few miles north of De Noc's CBD.

Major Roads
The busiest and most developed corridor is along East Roxbury Trail (NM 66). These recent plat drawings included a significant amount of retail and restaurants along that route, as well as industrial facilities, apartments, and condominiums. Much of the retail and restaurant development is centered at the junction of East Roxbury Trail and I-298. Just east of that junction is the metro's first "lifestyle center", The Villages At Timberstone Hill. Elfstone Road, another major artery, runs along the eastern egde of the new shopping district.

Another major east-west highway is Frying Pan Lake Road, lined with retail, office parks, and apartment complexes. The City of De Noc Division of Public Works has a service yard on this road. The same road also has the Northeast Station of the De Noc Police Department. Just west of the suburb of Camp Seven, the road has the giant Shingleton Roto Plastics plant, served by railcars on the De Noc Trunk Line Railroad.

County Boulevard, East, is another major east-west highway that was part of this group of plat drawings. In addition to retail, restautants, and some small industry, this road also includes Roberts Rapids Park, a nice splash of green along North Creek. The park's ammenities include picnic areas, basketball courts, baseball diamonds, and soccer fields. This area also includes a City of De Noc Water Department pumping station.

Going with my penchant to have some fun, a major north-south arterial is Bubble Puppy Road. White Pine Road includes retail, industry, and apartment complexes. The busiest north-south corridor developed during this Summer 2008 "plat-a-thon" was Camp Seven Highway, with a broad mix of retail, restaurants, industry, and apartment complexes.

Bike Trails
Bike trails in these plats include portions of the Verlander Road Trail, the Moss Lake Trail, the Frying Pan Lake Trail, and the Francis Trail. The Verlander Trail was my first-ever experiment in Class II bike lanes.....striped lanes sharing the (wider) road with motor vehicles. I have been attempting to develop bike trails with "commuting" in mind.....plats from my younger years had bike trails solely for recreation.

Putting It All Together
Trying to manage all of these big drawings in a logical manner can be a chore because the roads, rivers, rail tracks, bike routes, and transit all have to connect with previous drawings. Before starting on the project I drew a simple one-page map, with the main focus points listed or shown. Using that "helper" and accessing my multi-page files that list what I need to "build", I develop the plats.
_____

When finished with this project, in the next few weeks, De Noc will jump to a population of about 1,220,000. :)

Bear
 

Bear Up North

Cyburbian Emeritus
Messages
9,323
Points
31
De Noc Now 10th Largest City

Breaking news.....De Noc has slipped to the 10th spot on the list of the largest cities in the USA (in population). When I started this seemingly-never-ending thread my huge fake city was sitting in the 9th spot. Year 2007 population estimates for other cities (some growing in population size much faster than De Noc) have been compared to my most-recent city stats.

If you read the preceeding post, you know that I was working over the summer on drawing a significant number of plats in the northeastern sector of De Noc. No suburbs were involved in this project. I am not finished with the project, but my work today (a pleasant day off work) gave me a chance to get the final population statistics. My summertime project netted 22,207.....many more than I had predicted.

Details, based on Year 2007 census estimates.....

Population Of Cities:
9. Dallas - 1,240,499
10. De Noc - 1,232,425
11. San Jose - 939,899

Population Of Standard Metropolitan Area:
26. Sacramento - 2,091,120
27. De Noc - 2,062,819
28. Orlando - 2,032,496

Preliminary density data for corporate De Noc is 4871 per square mile. However, the real number will be higher. That number is arrived at by using the total plat count for De Noc, 253 plats. When I finish all my stat tabulation I will be subtracting significant "land", because many of my plats have lakes and streams.
_____

Reality check: For a city the size of De Noc I do not have nearly-enough support structures and am missing sig amounts of infrastructure. Examples of support structures and infrastructure additions would include more police stations, additional water-pumping facilitiesd, and more public works department facilities. In the last few years I have made lists to add more of these (shall we say "important and vital"?) goodies. Still a lot to do.

Bear
Proud To Claim "World's Largest Hand-Drawn Fictional Map"
 

mgk920

Cyburbian
Messages
4,201
Points
26
Am I correct in assuming that the State of Northern Michigan is as pro-city with its annexation law as the State of Michigan is anti-city?

^o)

Mike
 

Bear Up North

Cyburbian Emeritus
Messages
9,323
Points
31
Am I correct in assuming that the State of Northern Michigan is as pro-city with its annexation law as the State of Michigan is anti-city?

^o)

Mike

mgk920.....Please "bear" with me.....I am not planner-educated, so I am not quite sure of what you are referencing with the State of Michigan. As for my De Noc metro, it is filled with suburbs.....I think I have nearly 80 suburbs! But the city of De Noc has not been "blocked-in" and continues to grow. I often compare De Noc to the Twin Cities. Similar metro populations but the corporate limit total population of Minneapolis and St. Paul is much smaller than De Noc corporate. Suburbs in the Twin Cities have much more of a percentage.

Over the years, the only annexation I did that actually "wiped out" suburbs was elimination of Oak Falls and Orange Villa. That was years ago.

Bear
 

DetroitPlanner

Cyburbian Emeritus
Messages
6,238
Points
27
Am I correct in assuming that the State of Northern Michigan is as pro-city with its annexation law as the State of Michigan is anti-city?

^o)

Mike

Michgan is pro-home rule. It is not anti-city there is a difference. Where the economy chugs along, the cities are in great shape. Where it don't the cities are a mess. Home rule allows for stronger townships, which can be difficult because folks who are city dwellers move to them for less taxes only to realize that they are on their own for garbage collection and have much less in the way of services.
 

mgk920

Cyburbian
Messages
4,201
Points
26
mgk920.....Please "bear" with me.....I am not planner-educated, so I am not quite sure of what you are referencing with the State of Michigan. As for my De Noc metro, it is filled with suburbs.....I think I have nearly 80 suburbs! But the city of De Noc has not been "blocked-in" and continues to grow. I often compare De Noc to the Twin Cities. Similar metro populations but the corporate limit total population of Minneapolis and St. Paul is much smaller than De Noc corporate. Suburbs in the Twin Cities have much more of a percentage.

Over the years, the only annexation I did that actually "wiped out" suburbs was elimination of Oak Falls and Orange Villa. That was years ago.

Bear
I was simply referring to the fact that it is very difficult, if not impossible, for cities in Michigan to annex land and that, with only a tiny handful of exceptions, these cities are all essentially built out. ALL new growth in their metros MUST then be in the suburbs. OTOH, even with its numerous suburbs, De Noc has plentiful undeveloped land within its corporate limits - telling me that state law has a fairly easy process for its cities to expand their corporate limits to accommodate new growth.

Mike
 

Bear Up North

Cyburbian Emeritus
Messages
9,323
Points
31
Project List In PDF

In this thread, in a number of posts, this Bear has mentioned that the project list for my fake city (De Noc) (in all reality, a fake "metro") is quite lengthy. In an attempt to share the detail of this project list, I have created a PDF file. Hopefully this works.....

Enjoy.....and your comments are always welcome.

Bear
 

Attachments

  • De Noc - Project Status Matrix.pdf
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Bear Up North

Cyburbian Emeritus
Messages
9,323
Points
31
October, 2008 - Summary

For those who are new to Cyburbia and those who have not (or will not) take the time to browse all the posts on this thread, here is a summary of my fake city. I have already claimed that it is the largest hand-drawn fictional city map in the world. The city (actually a metro) is more than a pile of drawings, though.....it is more than 43 years of pleasure, backed up by those stacks of drawings and thousands of documents, notes, statistics, and spreadsheet data.....all with the intent to present a fictional place as if it were real.

Physical Info
Plat size is approximately 22.5" x 17.5". As of mid-October, 2008, there are 436 actual plats drawn. 253 plats are for the city of De Noc. 183 are suburban plats. If laid-out in a gymnasium the size would be approximately 49' x 44'.

Geographic Location
In the Upper Peninsula of Michigan, with altered history that has given us a 51st state, Northern Michigan. De Noc is the capitol. Actual location, with some geographical altering is on the shores of Lake Michigan's Big Bay De Noc.

Population & Community Details
De Noc is the 10th largest city in the U.S., based on 2007 population estimates from the Census Bureau. The city's population is 1,232,425. The metro area is ranked 27th, with a population of 2,062,819. There are 70 suburban communities that ring the city. Population density for De Noc is 6531 and for the suburbs the density is 5496.

CBD & Skylines
Metropolitan De Noc has 232 hi-rise buildings (10 floors or more). In the De Noc central business district there are 16 buildings that are 500' or higher. Some neighborhoods in De Noc also have hi-rise buildings, usually apartment towers. 16 different suburbs also have hi-rise buildings.

The CBD is typical of any large downtown area, with numerous skyscrapers, a vibrant daytime economy, an active nightlife, educational opportunities, health care, and hi-rise housing. City, county, and federal government officers are located in the CBD.

State Government
The Northern Michigan State Capitol is located a few miles north of the CBD. A large state office building is also in that complex. 19 other state buildings are scattered in the metro, including more in neighborhoods of De Noc and in the suburbs of Cinderdale, Alaska House, and Bailey Creek. The state employs more than 10,000 people in the area.

The federal government operates a Homeland Security Training Center on the campus-like Northern Michigan Police & Fire Training Center, a 420-acre complex in the southeastern metro.

Education
De Noc is home to three large universities, Patrick Stanley University (24,000 students), Mixhigan Shores State University (22,000 students), and the University of De Noc (18,000 students). Sturgeon River Technical School has 11,000 students, East De Noc Community College has 4500 students and a branch campus of Northern Michigan University (in suburban Slater) has 2500 students. Seven other colleges are in the metro.

The city of De Noc has 29 public high schools, the suburbs have 73 public high schools, there are 12 Catholic high schools in the metro, and there are 6 private high schools. The metro has over 300 elementary and junior high schools.

Health Care
De Noc is a regional health care center, serving much of the Upper Great Lakes. The metro has 15 hospitals that employ more than 29,000 health care professionals. Three of those hospitals are Level 1 Trauma Centers. The area has 6720 hospital beds, slightly above the national average based on population. The suburb of Katie Shores is home to ther world-famous Lake Superior Cancer Research Center & Hospital.

Transit
Transit in the metro is provided by the De Noc Transit System (DNTS), using a highly-acclaimed monorail system and a huge fleet of urban busses. The high-speed monorail includes 67 stations, more than 100 miles of trackage, 5 main lines, and 3 feeder lines. 800 urban transit busses enhance the opportunities for public transit.

Downtown De Noc also has a 6 mile People-Mover System, with 7 stations that shuttle transit riders in the CBD between shopping, casinos, hotels, the Convention Center, and the huge De Noc Sports Complex.

The suburb of Katie Shores also has a People-Mover, moving passengers between thei Katie Shores downtown area, a newer convention center, an aquarium, and a lanadmark observation tower.

Expressways
The metro is criss-crossed with numerous limited-access highways. Interstate designations in the metro include I-98, I-298, I-398, and I-498. As of this writing, 178.5 miles of expressway have been constructed, with more under construction. Those expressways have 1061.5 lane miles.

Waterfront Development
De Noc is a late player in development of waterfront areas. Because of the extensive park and beach development the inland lakes that dot the metro have good public access. However, industrial development has stymied public access to Lake Michigan. Recently a group known as the De Noc Regional Waterfront Partnership identified 9 separate districts for future development of the waterfront.

Airport
De Noc has the nation's newest large airport, Northern Lights International Airport. It replaced a much-smaller facility. Northern Lights has over 1000 flight operations daily and has not seen a noticeable downturn in traffic during the economic slump, primarily due to its' role as the airport of choice of the Upper Great Lakes.

The metro also has a few smaller "executive-type" airports.

Urban Renewal
Urban renewal.....1960s style.....reared its' now-considered-ugly head in many areas of the central core of the city. Ten different urban renewal districts were developed, complete with high-rise apartment complexes, during the 1960s and 1970s.

Superfund Site
There is one location in De Noc that has been identified as a "Superfund Site", the former Morris Plating Company property, abandoned in 1970.

Shopping & SkyTube
The CBD had two large indoor malls. Last year, one of those malls closed. The downtown area still is a mecca for shopping, with 6 large department stores. The metro has 12 large shopping centers (some are indoor malls) and hundreds of smaller strip centers. There is a large regional mall in Katie Shores, a value-mall in Hiawatha, and a new lifestyle center shopping complex in the northeastern De Noc area.

SkyTube is downtown De Noc's system of elevated and enclosed walkways and underground walkways. The SkyTube system (at 4940') includes 21 "skywalks" and 41 "tubewalks", all with shopping and entertainment venues.

Newspapers
The area has two large daily newspapers, The De Noc Silver Dollar and The De Noc Bulletin.

Parks, Beaches
The De Noc Metropolitan Park Board (DNMPB) oversees a huge park and beach system that includes 67 parks, beaches, and forest preserves and 49 small urban playgrounds. Total acreage for the system is now at 21,486....10.5 acres for every 1000 residents.....slightly above the national standard.

DNMPB also oversees11 different Class I bike routes that are scattered throughout the metro. These routes now total 70 miles and more are under construction or under consideration. There is now a strong emphasis on commuter routes, complete with parking areas for vehicles and routes going to districts with large concentrations of daytime employees (such as industrial parks, office parks, medical centers, and education centers).

Casino Districts
Casino gambling has been legal in Northern Michigan since the mid-1960s. The metro has four areas that have been designated as "casino districts". These districts each have a number of casinos, usually with accomodations attached. The areas are: Central Business District (Downtown De Noc), Convention Center District (Downtown De Noc), International Airport District, and the Katie Shores District.

Manufacturing
Metropolitan De Noc has slipped from 23rd largest U.S. manufacturing center to 24th largest. The area now employs 123,615 in manufacturing, a loss in 10 years of 9030 jobs. That 7% reduction was actually much smaller than other major Great Lakes' metros.

Products still manufactured in the metro include plastic products, recreational products, wood products, vehicle parts and bodies, specialty steels, machinery, railcars, kitchen equipment, defense electronics, and medical imaging equipment. The area is also gaining respect as a leader in research.

Superior Research Park, 1450 acres with 12 private corporations and one federal facility, is located in southeastern De Noc and in the suburb of St. Jaques. The Park also includes a number of research facilities on the east campus of Patrick Stanley University.

De Noc Sports Complex
This huge complex has four major league stadiums, located just southwest of the CBD. The complex is served by a DNTS monorail station and two DNTS People-Mover stations. The complex includes Pioneer Park (MLB), Star Arena (NHL), Martin Centre (NBA and special events and concerts), and Superior Stadium (NFL).

Northern Michigan International Grand Prix Race Course
This huge course.....the longest "grand prix style" course in the world.....is located in the southeastern suburb of Southgate. Capacity at numerous grandstands that line the curving track is well over 325,000.

Other Attractions
Museum of Science & Industry (Near State Capitol)
City Museum (In CBD)
Fairhaven Museum of Modern Art (In Fairhaven)
Plum Street Art District (Just north of CBD)
Star Tower (800' enclosed observation tower in Katie Shores)
Sea-Lake Aquarium (In Katie Shores)
De Noc Convention Center (In CBD)
West Winds Convention Center (In Katie Shores)
De Noc Ballet Hall (Home of The De Noc Ballet....in northeast De Noc)
Orchestra Hall (Home of The De Noc Orchestra.....in northeast De Noc)
Overmyer Television Network (OTN) Studios (In northeastern De Noc)
De Noc Motor Speedway (In south-central De Noc)
Sportsman's Park (Horse racing.....in western De Noc)
River Downs (Horse racing.....in south De Noc)
_____

This completes the summary of Metropolitan De Noc.

Bear
 

Bear Up North

Cyburbian Emeritus
Messages
9,323
Points
31
Subdivision Names

Like any city planner with a pair of moxies, this Bear has fought with the developers in the Metropolitan De Noc area over the chosen names for their subdivisions. Some of their choices made sense.....geographical fit and that sort of thing.....and some were simply more "yuppiespeak".

Here are a few of the subdivision names from my fake city.....

Forest Ridge
Park Forest
Tall Timber
Lakeview Heights (the view is of Lake Michigan)
Mallard Creek (there is no Mallard Creek but the name flew in, anyway)
Smokey Hills (no such hills....perhaps "Foggy Hills" would have been more appropriate)
Forest Lakes
Sculptured Cliffs
Northern Woods
Birch Landing
Stepping Stone
Brookside
Blue Heron Hills (no such name, but the site is hilly)
Forest Park (yes, also listed above is "Park Forest")
De Noc Highlands
Birch Woods
Breckenridge (Yeah, right)
Superior Vista
Red Hills (some truth to this one.....red soil is common in the area)
Founder's Shore (rip-off from Marquette's Founder's Landing)
Michigan Vista
_____

I gotta tell ya.....thinking-up names for thousands of places, buildings, and whatevers is taxing on this ole' Bear. Help me out....throw me some names for future subdivisions. :-D

Bear
 

kms

Cyburbian
Messages
6,938
Points
47
How about Misty HIlls instead of Smokey? Or, in addition to?

Since I'm the erosion control inspector, I get to see the new neighborhoods first. One of my favorite names was Green Orchard Estates. I think that the real estate/marketing company thought it that the name wouldn't bring customers, so the developer changed it to Deer Run.

WIllowbrook is popular here, as is anything with Deer or Forest in the names.
 

Bear Up North

Cyburbian Emeritus
Messages
9,323
Points
31
De Noc Public School District

This Bear has been modifying some of the numbers for the De Noc Public School District. Because of changing family size the district student population has shrunk by more than 10,000 in the past decade. The district is now considering closing some high schools. Of course, that decision will involve the community, neighborhood advocates, a logical look at transportation options, and growth patterns.

The area within the corporate limits continues to expand, but that has only increased the student population at the high schools that are on the perimeter of those boundaries. High schools in the central city have shown considerable student population decline.

Here are some facts and stats for the De Noc Public School District:

Dallas Independent School District (161,244) (14th Largest)
De Noc Public School District (151,550) (15th Largest)
Gwinnett County Public Schools (144,598) (16th Largest)

De Noc - Number of Senior High Schools (29)
Senior High School Student Population (42,662)
Largest High School (F. D. Roosevelt - 2435)
High Schools With Over 2000 Students (Roosevelt, Sibley Bay, North, Newton)
Number Of High Schools Over 1000 Population (25)
Vocational High Schools (3)

Some other facts and stats.....

Northern Michigan has 5 different divisions for high school sports, based on student population. The De Noc Public School District has 10 schools in Division A, 15 schools in Division B, and 4 schools in Division C. The District has no schools in the state's two smallest divisions, D and E. In the Metropolitan Area there are 9 high schools in Class A. Outstate (the balance of Northern Michigan) there are only 3 other high schools in Class A.....Marquette, Escanaba, and Sault Ste. Marie.

Three of the district's high schools are the result of annexations in the 1950s. Steinman High School was originally Orange Villa High School. Orange Villa was annexed in 1952. Another 1952 annexation was the city of Lexington. Lexington High School did not undergo a name change. In 1954, the city of Oak Falls was annexed. That annexation gave the De Noc District the high school with the name changed to Oakview High School.

As mentioned in a previous post, the district still offers vocational-style education at three different high schools. The district now plans to eliminate two of those schools.

High schools that are being considered for elimination include Ripple Heights, Newton, Brooklyn Heights, and Alpha.

Bear
 

Bear Up North

Cyburbian Emeritus
Messages
9,323
Points
31
High School Football

Call me a geek. I enjoy (and I relax) when I develop statistics that make my fake city (and all those suburbs) seem real. For the past couple weeks I have been periodically working on a project started a number of years ago.....determining all of the year-by-year details for high school football. (Other sports will follow.....I started with my favorite.)
_____

As of 2008, there are now 13 different high school football conferences in the De Noc Metropolitan Area. Some history of the conferences.....

1934 - Lake County Prep League (Started with 4 De Noc schools, 1 Catholic school, 3 suburban schools)
1936 - De Noc City League is formed, with 9 De Noc schools, including Catholic
1940 - De Noc City League divides into East and West Divisions, with 9 schools
1942 - Lake County Prep League disbands
1942 - Suburban Lakes League is formed, with 5 suburban schools
1942 - Southern Lakes League is formed, with 6 suburban schools

State Champions in football from 1934 through 1947 were crowned in Michigan, via a poll. With the 1948 statehood for Northern Michigan, the new state had its' own football poll and its' own State Champions.

1949 - West Metro League is formed, with 6 schools
1950 - Catholic League is formed, with 7 schools
1954 - De Noc City League divides into 4 divisions, North-South-East-West....26 schools
1958 - Bay De Noc League is formed, with 5 schools
1960 - North Woods League is formed, with 5 schools
1961 - Metro Seven League is formed, with 7 schools
1963 - Catholic League divides into North and South Divisions, with 11 schools
1964 - Superior Conference formed, with 5 schools
1970 - High School play-off system begins, with five classes, based on student population
1971 - Blue Water League is formed, with 5 schools
1973 - Forest Conference is formed, with 4 schools
2001 - Northern Highlands League formed, with 4 schools
2008 - Snowpack Conference formed, with 5 schools
_____

De Noc City League.....The largest prep conference in Northern Michigan has produced 32 State Champions. When the Oak Falls Red Raiders were still a suburb (before the 1954 annexation to De Noc) they won the Michigan State High School Championship three years in a row, 1939, 1940, and 1941. After annexation the school name changed to Oakview. As a member of the DNCL the Red Raiders won 5 Class C titles.

Other DNCL schools with multiple championships.....

Orange Lake Island Kings (8 Class B)
Roosevelt Rangers (6 Class A) (1956 Northern Michigan Poll Champ)
Sibley Bay Pikemen (3 Class A) (1960 and 1969 Northern Michigan Poll Champ)
Steinman Orangemen (2 Class A) (1967 Northern Michigan Poll Champ)
Belvedere Vocational (2 Class C)
Devonshire (2 Class B)

1994 was an exceptionally strong year for the DNCL. Three schools won State Championships.....Sibley Bay (Class A), Orange Lake (Class B), and Belvedere Vocational (Class C).

Suburban Lakes League.....This conference has produced 12 State Champions.....

Kingstown Royals (3 Class E)
Norse Mountain Vikings (3 Class C) (1964 and 1965 Northern Michigan Poll Champ)
(Mohawk Park) Lakecrest (1 Class A) (1957 Northern Michigan Poll Champ)
Isabella Pirates (2 Class C)

Southern Lakes League
Sunset Beach Panthers (2 Class B)

Bay De Noc League
Valleyview Bucks (3 Class B)

North Woods League
Camp Seven Bears (3 Class C)
Moss Lake Lightning Bolts (4 Class A)

Metro Seven League
Whitefish Cougars (3 Class A)
Lakeview Rams (2 Class C)

Superior Conference.....This conference has been very impressive in the divisions with smaller student populations, taking home 23 State Championships.

Brookley Blue Devils (5 Class D)
(De Noc) Grace Christian Tigers (7 Class D)
Slater Mohawks (3 Class D)
(De Noc) Blue Ridge Academy Ridge Runners (4 Class E)
(West Elwood) Faith Christian Hornets (4 Class E)

Blue Water League.....This conference is also impressive, with 17 State Champions.

West Elwood Pioneers (3 Class E)
Big Bay De Noc Black Bears (9 Class E)
Orangewood Lakers (3 Class E)
Nahma Junction Thunderbolts (2 Class D)

West Metro League.....Many consider this the strongest Class A football conference in Northern Michigan. The league has produced 12 State Champions.

St. Vital Tigers (4 Class A) (1966 Northern Michigan Poll Champ)
Rainy Lake Crushers (5 Class A)
Des Plaines Bearcats (1961 & 1962 Northern Michigan Poll Champs)
Skybear Dancing Bears (1968 Northern Michigan Poll Champ)

Des Plaines and Skybear both moved to the Forest Conference in 1973. The Des Plaines Bearcats won 3 Class B titles after that move and Skybear won a Class B title in 1977. They are the only two Metro schools to win titles as representatives from more than one conference.

Catholic League.....The Catholic League has always been a strong high school football conference. This league has produced

(Fairhaven) Western Catholic Red Foxes (6 Class B)
(De Noc) Eastern Catholic Friars (2 Class C)
(De Noc) St. Hedwig Crusaders (1954 & 1955 Northern Michigan Poll Champs)
(De Noc) St. Rose Little Giants (1 Class C) (1958 Northern Michigan Poll Champ)
(De Noc) Northern Catholic Chargers (3 Class A)
_____

Before statehood, the only representative from the De Noc Metropolitan Area that won a State Championship was Oak Falls, as mentioned above. After statehood but before the Divisional System began (1948 through 1969), 19 of 22 State Champions were from the Metro. The big school division (A, with over 1500 students) and the next largest division (B) have dominated football championships since 1970.

Most of the schools that are not in the De Noc Metropolitan Area are quite small, so their influence in felt in the gathering of State Championships.....mainly because there are so many of them, compared to a Metro with very few small schools. But even with that numerical advantage, the Metro's smaller school conferences have produced many State Champions.
_____

As indicated at the beginning of this post.....I relieve a ton of stress when I add details to my fake city. This has been a quite-elaborate post, to make that point.

Those of you who follow high school football in your own (real) area are probably getting a bit of a kick from this post. Those who don't care probably haven't read this far down, anyway. ;)

Enjoy.

Bear
 

JNA

Cyburbian Plus
Messages
26,968
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71
Had any De Noc players ever been recruited and played for any College Big 10 or (old) Big 8 Conference teams in any any sport ?
 

Bear Up North

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Another Look At Bike Trails

Back on post 85 in this thread, this Bear discussed the De Noc Metropolitan Area's bicycle trail system. Today, enjoying my final vacation day over the long Turkey Day holiday 08, I popped-in an old movie for background relaxation and started thumbing through all of my plats.....compiling some bike path info.

My evaluation did show that it wasn't until Plat 161 that I placed a bike path on a drawing. Oddly, I never placed a drawn-on date on my plats (how un-anal of me) so I would have to guess that the drawing was probably late-60s. That may be a bit of a statement that I had little understanding of bicycle paths back in "the day".

Overall Location Coverage
If you divide the entire De Noc Metro into four separate squares.....NW, NE, SW, and SE.....the locations of bicycle trails are not well-balanced (geographically). The northeast sector and the southeast sector each have a considerable number of lengthy trails. There is also a trail connection between those sectors. And there are a few park and ride lots for bike commuters who chose not to ride on city streets......they bring their ride over to the lot, using their vehicle, and commute (or pleasure ride) from there.

The southwest metro has the greatest number of trails. The coverage is certainly enhanced by the very-long (12 miles) Sturgeon River Bike Trail. That north-south path is primarily within the boundaries of the Sturgeon River Greenbelt (5224 acres).

The northwest sector has only one (very short) bike trail. Today's project gave me some visibility.....and that visibility should help me improve bike trail access for citizens in the neglected northwest corner.

Sub-Projects
Based on my analysis, here's my tentative sub-project list for enhancing the bicycle trails of Metropolitan De Noc.....

Develop a new trail in the northwestern sector of the metro.
Develop a major east-west trail that will include a commuter path to the CBD.
Develop a major north-south trail that will include a commuter path to the CBD.
The new east-west trail should include linkage to Michigan Shores State University.
The new east-west trail should include linkage to The University of De Noc.
Increase the number of park and ride lots that are adjacent to the trail system.

The new paths will be a combination of Class I trails (located in parks and greenways) and Class II trails (connecting those Class I trails). I also will try to locate portions of the trails very near to De Noc Transit System (DNTS) stations.
_____

Side-note: I have four large index maps that I use to get a good geographic picture of locations and routings. For example, when placed together for today's project the results I added to the index maps provided an instant "feel" for where I was lacking concerning bike trails. Sure beats laying-out over 400 big plats.

Bear
 

Bear Up North

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Density & Cell Tower Discussion (From Another Thread)

In the middle of another thread, looking at what non-planners do for a living, I asked Veloise a question about cell phone towers. I was looking for an idea as to how many towers a metro such as De Noc would actually have. Metro De Noc, with a population just under 2,100,000 covers an area of nearly 500 square miles. Over the years I have erected "some" cell towers, but not too many.

The response from Veloise hinted at De Noc having a bit of a "density issue". My response.....

I have accurate density numbers for De Noc and for the nearly 80 suburbs that surround the core city. In a project a few years ago I went through every plat that I have drawn (since 1965!) and calculated the amount of land (in acres) and the amount of water (in acres). Using the population data for each plat I arrived at the density numbers.

Using a calculation of the Detroit Free Press numbers provided by Veloise, I arrived at the density numbers that follow. I have thrown into the list the numbers I have from Minneapolis and St. Paul.

Manhattan - 66,951 / Square Mile
San Francisco - 16,099 / Square Mile
Boston - 12,009 / Square Mile
Detroit - 6723 / Square Mile
De Noc - 6531 / Square Mile
Minneapolis - 5496 / Square Mile
De Noc Suburbs - 5496 / Square Mile
St. Paul - 5379 / Square Mile

Bottom line.....De Noc (and it's suburbs) are akin to other spread-out Great Lakes area communities, as related to density.
_____

Now about those cell towers.....as mentioned in the other thread, my fake metro has nearly 2,100,000 people. The area is relatively flat near Lake Michigan (southern suburbs) but has more of a gently rolling touch as you move north of the CBD. The metro is criss-crossed by many highways, numerous ROWs, is pockmarked with many larger inland lakes, and has a large number of tall buildings (many of which are located in clusters throughout the metro).

De Noc is served by three different cell phone corporations.

That's my story and I'm sticking to it.

Bear
 

Bear Up North

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DNTS (Schematics)

I have been working on a major transit project. Here's an update.....

I have updated the two schematics that illustrate (via the magic of Excel, converted to a pair of PDF files) the different transit lines for the De Not Transit System (DNTS). The schematics show the main lines (an extensive monorail system) and the People-Mover that is located in the Central Business District. The People-Mover is based on Detroit's physical version. There is also a smaller-in-distance People-Mover in the destination suburb of Katie Shores. That is not shown, although it is referenced in the main schematic. (Note: The two schematics are not to scale.)

When viewing the entire De Noc Metropolitan Area I am a bit miffed at myself.....the system is weak on north-south routings. Some of that weakness is legit, though.....there are major inland lakes that create physical barriers to some north-south routings. Those lakes do not show on the schematics.

The project, just starting, includes the following.....

Name of each station.
Type of each station: Underground, street-level, with parking, "Kiss & Ride" feature.
Adjacent to a bike trail.
Population within 3/4 mile.
Population density within 3/4 mile.
Attractions nearby or adjacent.
Retail nearby or adjacent.

And in case you are wondering, even though I am not a real planner, I do understand a little about Transit-Oriented Development (TOD). ;)

The first PDF shows the main lines. The second PDF shows the CBD. Hopefully, all of the color-coding shows on your view of the PDFs. Enjoy!

Bear
 

Attachments

  • DN DNTS.pdf
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  • DN DNTS2.pdf
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Bear Up North

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Metropolitan De Noc Statistics

This Bear spent an enjoyable vacation day (Friday) working on the big transit project and finished-up by compiling a few more vital statistics. The transit project is a "biggie". I spent about 5 hours on it today and only went through 7 transit station neighborhoods. It's hard work being a planner. ;)

The following statistics have been presented in other posts OR updated in other posts OR are new stats, presented for the first time.....

Metropolitan De Noc

De Noc, Northern Michigan - Established August 28, 1848
De Noc, Northern Michigan - 1,232,425 (Ranked 10th, population)
Metropolitan De Noc - 2,062,819 (Ranked 27th, population)
Largest Suburb - Fairhaven (104,550)
2nd Largest Suburb - Mohawk Park (68,340)
3rd Largest Suburb - Wilwood (37,945)
Central City VS Suburbs Population - 59% Of Population Is In De Noc Corporate Limits
Metropolitan Area ("Built-Up") - 435 Square Miles (Includes inland lakes)
Inland Lakes - 20
De Noc Land VS Inland Lake - 20% Inland Lake Acreage
Suburban Land VS Inland Lake - 10% Inland Lake Acreage
Lake Michigan Shoreline - 38 Miles
Elevation Of Highest Inland Lake - 609' Above Sea Level (Dancing Bear Lake)
Lake Michigan Elevation - 577' Above Sea Level
De Noc Population Density - 6531 / Square Mile
Suburban Population Density - 5496 / Square Mile
Average Daily High & Low, January - 25F / 7F
Average Daily High & Low, July - 77F / 58F
Snowfall Average, Southern Metro - 60 Inches / Year
Snowfall Average, Northern Metro - 80 Inches / Year
Average Annual Precipitation - 34 Inches

Manufacturing Employment - 124,125
Wholesale & Retail Trade Employment - 218,000
Health Care Employment - 105,000
Federal Government Employment - 18,500
Educational Facilities Employment - 56,000
State Government Employment - 10,000)
Skyscrapers - 232 (10 Stories Or Higher)
Tallest Building - Star Tower (Observation Tower) (800')
Tallest Office Building - One Jackson Center (756')

De Noc Public School District - 151,550 Students (15th Largest)
High Schools - 130
Elementary Schools & Junior High Schools - 410
Higher Education Students - 86,000
Major Universities - 3
Technical & Business Colleges - 4
Community (2-Year) Colleges - 2
Other Colleges - 5

Fortune 500 World Headquarters - 1 (Star, Inc.)
Regional Shopping Malls - 2
Other Shopping Malls - 4
Major Shopping Centers - 8
Lifestyle Center - 1

Port of De Noc - 11 Million Tons / Year (Ranking: 55th)
Newspaper Circulation - Daily, Except Sunday (385,000) (2 Major Daily Newspapers)
Newspaper Circulation - Sunday (490,000) (2 Major Daily Newspapers)
Cemeteries - 12 (1882 Acres)
Convention Centers - 2 (De Noc, 600,000 Sq. Ft. & Westwinds, 180,000 Sq. Ft.)
Hotel Rooms - 4500
Hospitals - 14 (6720 Beds)
Railroad Lines Serving Metro - 5
State Highways - 5
Interstate Highways - 4
Freeway Lane Miles - 1255
Neighborhoods With Recreational Boating Canals - 7
Major Industrial Parks - 9
Superfund Sites - 1
Airport Operations - 1000 / Day (Northern Lights International Airport)
Major League Sports Teams & Stadiums - 4
Minor League Sports Teams & Stadiums - 2
Urban Renewal Districts - 10
Regional Bus Lines - 2 (Greyhound & Short Way)
Taxi Fleets - 5
Enclosed Walkway System In Central Business District - SkyTube
World Television Network Headquarters & Studios - 1 (Overmyer Television Network)
Television Stations - 9
Radio Stations - 29
Casino Districts - 4
Regional Theater Groups - 14
Movie Screens - 69

De Noc Transit System - Monorail (5 Lines / 100 Miles / 67 Stations)
De Noc Transit System - Downtown People-Mover
De Noc Transit System - Katie Shores People-Mover
De Noc Transit System - 800 Transit Busses
Transit Ridership - 8.5%

Parks & Beaches - 67
Urban Playgrounds - 49
Outside Skating Rinks - 92
Total Park Acreage - 21,486 (De Noc Metropolitan Park Board)
Northern Michigan State Game Preserve - 1 (Big Rabbit Lake)
Golf Courses - 23
Class I Bike Paths - 51.5 Miles
Boat Launching Facilities - 16
Fishing Piers - 2
Recreational Boating Locks - 3
_____

Tons of data. Enjoy.

Bear
 

Bear Up North

Cyburbian Emeritus
Messages
9,323
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31
Electric Grid

As mentioned in another post, Metropolitan De Noc is served by the De Noc Edison Company. That company joins a number of other companies in Northern Michigan to form the electric power grid that keeps the 51st state "buzzing". Details:

De Noc Edison Company
A system that includes 765 kv transmission lines, 3 fossil fuel plants (in the immediate Metro) and 1 nuclear plant (on the Garden Peninsula, 25 miles distant).

Upper Peninsula Power Company
A system that includes 765 kv and 345 kv transmission lines, 7 fossil fuel plants, and 6 hydro-power plants. Service area is the western and northern portions of the state, west of the De Noc Metro.

Wisconsin Power Company
A system that includes 765 kv and 345 kv transmission lines, 2 fossil fuel plants, and 1 hydro-power plant. Service area is the southwestern portions of the state, running primarily along the counties that border Wisconsin.

Sault Electric Company
A system that includes 765 kv transmission lines, 2 fossil fuel plants, and 1 hydro-power plant. Service area includes most of the eastern portion of the state.

Cloverland Electric Co-Op
Cloverland purchases electricity from the other Northern Michigan generators and sells it to primarily rural consumers. The company has no ultra-high-wattage lines and has no power-generating plants.

Northern Power & Light Company
Northern Power is the "feeder" from the State of Michigan, via ultra-high-wattage lines, specifically submarine/underground across the Straits of Mackinac.
_____

I have been working on the railroad lines that feed De Noc's fossil-fuel plants. My project includes increasing the yard sizees so more loaded hopper cars can be staged at-or-near the plants. Important to note that these big users of coal bring in "dirty" coal (via the Port of De Noc, shipped from Toledo and Ashtabula) and "clean" coal (via the rail lines that serve the Metro.

I did close the oldest electric generator, a fossil fuel plant near the Lake County Fairgrounds (north side of De Noc). I still have plans on the drawing board for a new coal-fired plant to replace the lost-kilo-wattage, probably to be placed on the shoreline of Lake Michigan. That would reduce unit-trains weaving through a portion of the metro).

Bear
 

TOFB

Cyburbian
Messages
3,154
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44
Have the planners captured the public realm from the traffic engineers?

Any luck putting some of the big bad arterial vehicle movers on lane diets, to create complete streets?
 

Bear Up North

Cyburbian Emeritus
Messages
9,323
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31
Have the planners captured the public realm from the traffic engineers?

Any luck putting some of the big bad arterial vehicle movers on lane diets, to create complete streets?

??? Not sure if I understand your line of questioning. Concerning lane miles, if my data is reasonably accurate, Metro De Noc is.....

From list of 85 metro areas......50th, about the same as Seattle and Denver.
From list of biggest metro areas.....22nd, just ahead of Buffalo-Niagara Falls.

De Noc (if I calculated correctly) is at .609 lane miles per/capita.

Important Note: Generally speaking, my fake city is not really "planned". It is an assumption, based on how I would guesstimate it would have grown over the course of a century and a half.

:)

Rock On!
Bear
 

TOFB

Cyburbian
Messages
3,154
Points
44
Bear, that was kind of unfair of me. "Complete Streets" is a relatively new term from plannerspeak that refers to taking wide, high speed, high traffic arterials and making them more friendly for transit, bikes and pedestrians. www.completestreets.org

"Lane Diets" refers to taking these streets and reducing the number of lanes and/or lane width in order to slow traffic. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Road_diet
 

Bear Up North

Cyburbian Emeritus
Messages
9,323
Points
31
Islands & Fun Facts

First things first....."thank you", TOFB, for the push "streetwise". Now I have more projects on my already-huge MASTER PROJECT LIST. :-D
_____

The Inland Lake Islands
As faithful readers know, my fake Metro (De Noc) is pock-marked with many inland lakes, similar to the Twin Cities Metro. These lakes (and some streams) have a considerable number of islands, many of which are developed. Last week, as part of my ongoing waterfront project work, I identified all of the islands that are in the inland lakes of the Metro. I have attached a couple PDF files that summarize that look-see at island living in a metro area.

I identified 46 islands, ranging in size from 1 acre to 180 acres. Most of these islands are in the 20-35 acre range. The 1332 acres of island property are in De Noc and 10 other communities. 18 of the islands have no development. The islands have 531 all-season homes and 412 summer cottages.

Here are some other properties (etc.) that are on these islands:

Motel
Elementary school
Strip center
Apartments
3 yacht clubs
2 Private beaches
1 Public beach
Restaurants & taverns
De Noc Edison Company ROW
Closed amusement park
2 golf courses
1 golf fairway and green
College natatorium

When I first started drawing De Noc, my inland lakes had a number of different ferry services that served the islands. This weekend's project included the elimination of those 1960s era services. Gone are Red Lake Ferry Service, Green Lake Ferry Service, Cinderdale Ferry Service, and Frisco Island Ferry Company. The single company that now operates a reduced fleet is Red Devil Ferry Service.

Plum Street Art District
On the northern edge of De Noc's CBD is the Plum Street Art District. Plum Street is a winding city street that has morphed into a "hip" destination for fun-seekers in the area. On the streets nearby I have some older warehouse beuildings that may also change into clubs, galleries, etc. Here are some of the Plum Street goodies.....

MacNamara Gallery
De Noc Dance Academy
Derek Frame Company
Ramsey's Art Supply Store
O'Banion's Pub
Plum Dawn Gallery
Mad Dog Community Theater
Moody's (Bar & Grill)
Choo-Choo Boutique
Off-The-Wall Community Theater
Fat Moe's Jazz Club
Kinetic Ener-Gee (Club)
Hand Jive Gallery

The area also includes the huge City Museum complex, a nearby 8-story parking garage, numerous apartment buildings, and a pair of fountain squares. The area is only a few blocks from the skyscrapers of the CBD.

De Noc Sports Complex
In another post I mentioned that I had placed all four of the major league sports stadia in a common complex. Here are the clubs that surround those facilities.....

Fudgie's Bar & Grill
Irma's Tavern
Baggin's Bar & Grill
Ozzie's Tavern
Kong's Bar & Grill
The Tenth Pelican Club
Royal Oak Bar & Grill
Flynn's Bar & Grill
Flyball Tavern
Nicky's Sports Bar
Fowl Bull Tavern

Ozzie's and Kong's are also boat-accessible, on Clear Lake. The Tenth Pelican is boat-accessible, on Lake James.

Horse Racing
Looks like the end of an era. One of the two horse racing tracks in Metropolitan De Noc is closing. River Downs, located in the city of De Noc's southern area, has seen its' last race. Developers are already eyeing the property, with a strategic retail position on Long Lake Boulevard (Northern Michigan State 99).
_____

Bear
 

Attachments

  • Islands.pdf
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  • Islands2.pdf
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Bear Up North

Cyburbian Emeritus
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Sweeps, Trucks, Bike Trails

Sweeps

On my main project list, I have identified a number of individual projects as a "sweep". "Just what does that signify?", you may ask. When I have determined that I have to go through every single plat (well over 400) to identify, change, make a list of, etc. different items....that is listed as a "sweep" project. Example.....

Trucking Companies

Back in the 1960s I had a copy of a "trucking company listing" book, used by Toledo-area companies. I copied all of the names of the trucking companies and used that list for inclusion in De Noc. We all know that the freight business changed a lot in 30-40 years......most of those companies are no longer in business. But I never made those changes for my fake city. Thus, my latest "sweep" included identifying and changing those that were now wrong.

Bike Trails

My last "sweep" also included more details on bike trails. I now have some solid details on the bike trails that I have drawn-in. Almost all are Class I (Independent Bikeways). Just a couple miles of Class II (Striped Lanes).

Class I Trail Miles - 73.25
Class II Trail Miles - 2
Class III Trail Miles - 0
Total Trail Miles - 75.25
Total Trails - 15

Completed Trails (End-To-End) - 5
Municipalities With Trails - 13
Municipalities Within One Mile Of A Trail - 15
Commuter Parking Lot Connections - 5
DNTS Transit Station Connections - 1

University Access, Patrick Stanley University
University Access, Northern Michigan University, Slater Campus
Major Industrial Areas Access - 8

The De Noc Metropolitan Park Board (DNMPB) develops and manages the bike trail system. They have divided the metro into four separate quadrants. As indicated in a previous post, their intentions are to develop some linkage between each quadrant, which would further encourager commuter use of the trails. Other elements of their long-term plans include.....

Trails from each quadrant to the CBD.
Linkage to Michigan Shores State University and The University of De Noc.
Linkage to Fairhaven, the largest suburb.
Linkage to office complex areas for The State of Northern Michigan (in Cinderdale and Alaska House).
More transit station linkage.
More commuter lots.

Attached are PDF files for each quadrant, except the SW. For some reason it didn't take. I will post that attachment later.

Bear
 

Attachments

  • Bike Trail Map NE.pdf
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  • Bike Trail Map SE.pdf
    53.1 KB · Views: 36
  • Bike Trail Map NW.pdf
    34.9 KB · Views: 29

Bear Up North

Cyburbian Emeritus
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De Noc "Grab Bag"

Good day to provide an update and some details of what is going on with De Noc.....

Federal Facilities
I probably do not have enough federal facilities in Metropolitan De Noc. To help me track what I do have in federal, state, and city facilities I finally developed the documents and spreadsheets to assist with that chore.

Ronald Reagan Federal Building (CBD)
Federal Courthouse (I do not have a Federal Courthouse! I better insert one. :-c)
Federal Mint (In the suburb of Valleyview)
Homeland Security Training Center (A recent addition to the 420-acre Northern Michigan Police & Fireman Training Center)
EPA Testing Center (On the sprawling campus of the Superior Research Park)

This list does not include postal facilities or the Northern Michigan Air National Guard facility.

State Facilities
In addition to the State Capitol Building and the adjacent State Office Building, the metro area has 24 other facilities. These facilities (mostly office buildings) are located in the northern part of De Noc, and in the suburbs of Alaska House and Cinderdale.

Lake County Facilities
The county shares (with De Noc) the City-County Building, home to Lake County's Administrative Offices. The County Courthouse is also located in the CBD. The City-County Jail Center is also downtown.

The Lake County Sheriff patrols the unincorporated areas of the county, using two sub-stations for command points.....Ensign Township Sub-Station and Garden Township Sub-Station. The Sheriff also commands the four Harbor Patrol facilitites.

Other Lake County facilitites include the Sanitary District, Board of Health. and the Fair Board. The county also oversees the De Noc Metropolitan Housing Authority (DNMHA), with 18 different facilities that have more than 14,000 units.

City of De Noc Facilities
The city's main administration offices are in the (shared) City-County Building. The city also has a separate Municipal Records Center, also located in the CBD.

I have been adding Public Works Division Yards in different areas of the city. Last year I relocated the main De Noc Vehicle Maintenance & Storage Facility to the vacant property that was formerly Executive Airport. The central offices of the Public Works Division were also relocated to this facility. Also on the to-do list is a Central Distribution Facility.

The city's Judicial Division includes the Family Court Center and the (shared) City-County Jail.

The Public Safety Division includes the Police Department and the Fire Department. I have been working on a logical separation of different command districts for the Police Department. Here are the districts:

Central Command (Headquarters, located in CBD)
Northeast Command
Northwest Command
University Command
Southwest Command
Orange Lake Command
East Command
Wayside Lake Command

I have a ton of work to do on fire districts. :(

Airports
In previous posts I mentioned Northern Lights International Airport. The metro has some other airports, although none are capable of landing commercial jets. These other airports include.....

Fairhaven Field (In suburb of Fairhaven)
Big Peninsula Airport (Ensign Township)
Kitch Wheel Airport (Garden Township)
Garden Field (Garden Township)
Hunt & Fish Airstrip (Nahma Township)

Airports that closed include.....

Executive Field (Just NE of the CBD......now the Public Works Division HQ & Main Yard)
De Noc & Detroit Airline Company (Field and airline closed in 1978)
Indian Springs National Guard Air Base (Closed in 1989.....now an office park)

Manufacturing
While browsing satellite images of large (and real) manufacturing facilities it is easy to notice that older complexes will have many buildings of different sizes and shapes, often connected with small covered passageways. A look at modern plants often shows larger buildings, more rectangular. To see this, just do a Google Map of industries in a central core of a city and industries in the suburbs.

Years ago (1965! :-c) when I started to draw De Noc, my large industries all tended to be somewhat boxish or rectangular. I have been correcting that on my older drawings.......not that anyone except ME will notice. And on the newer plats in the suburbs and the outer portions of De Noc I tend to stay with a "manufactured building" look for many of the smaller industries.

The Bible
Where do I get all those company names? Glad you asked.....I have a 13-page document that I continually update. I carry a pocket notebook with me at all times and always jot down names of businesses that I see or read about. Subscribing to a number of trade journals is also a good source for names. I consider that document my "bible".....the first thing I grab when I am going to spend some time working on De Noc.

:D

Bear
 

stroskey

Cyburbian
Messages
1,212
Points
17
Is there any way you could upload some actual maps of the downtown or Katie Shores area? Thanks!
 
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