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Debunking the Exurban Myth - Study

boiker

Cyburbian
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http://www.fanniemaefoundation.org/programs/hpd/pdf/hpd_1003_nelson.pdf

As American cities spill over their traditional boundaries into “exurbia,” the debate about whether this new growth is substantively different from what preceded is an important one. We disagree with the idea that the counterurbanization the United States is experiencing represents a dramatic break from previous growth patterns.

Using parametric and nonparametric analysis, we examine whether or not the behavioral patterns and demographic characteristics of exurbanites differ from those
of suburbanites. Is exurbanization really different from suburbanization and are
exurbanites really different from suburbanites? Our research shows that the answer
is no. Exurbia should not be defined separately from suburbia. Rather, the
development on the metropolitan fringe is simply the latest incarnation of the continued suburbanization of American cities.
 

iamme

Cyburbian
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boiker said:
A little long but a good read, Thank You very much for posting.

If you have read this, my 2 cents on some of the age, income, families with children gaps that were reported can be explained away in the life cycle of a family. You don't have many empty nesters moving out to what are known as the exurbs. However, in many suburban (60's-80's type) areas you will have two income families whose children no longer live with them, people who have retired yet still occupy a 1600 SF ranch, and other non-traditional families.
 

Lee Nellis

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Thanks boiker.

I guess I had missed the literature claiming that exurbia is fundamentally different from suburbia. In my mind it has always been clear that exurbia is just a thinner spread of suburbia, as this paper demonstrates, although it would have been very interesting to see a comparison based on political orientation/attitudes. I think that a lot of those moving further out have different attitude sets.
 

boiker

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Lee Nellis said:
although it would have been very interesting to see a comparison based on political orientation/attitudes. I think that a lot of those moving further out have different attitude sets.
Just speculating, but often, those moving into these areas will hold values an poltical attitudes that orient in conflict of the previous generation. Aside from the standards of democratic cities and republican countryside, the subrubs are a dynamic environment with opinion that probably changes with natural migration and percieved national economic strength.
 

iamme

Cyburbian
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485
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Lee Nellis said:
Thanks boiker.
I think that a lot of those moving further out have different attitude sets.
<2cents>One thing that I have always considered yet cannot backup is that is the people that are moving out to these "exurban" areas are really no different than anyone else, but that their built environment affects them in a way which alters voting patterns, discounting economic status<2cents>
 

Lee Nellis

Cyburbian
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29
Possibly true to some extent and in some cases, but my experience with the really exurban is that they are pushed out there. Many of them have specifically searched for communities with no minorities, for example. Others look at crime rates. There are even differences between the exurban populations in different states based on whether, and how, the state enforces its home schooling laws. And of course, many many of them are specifically seeking to escape zoning laws, especially zoning laws that limit the keeping of livestock and put unreasonable limits on home businesses.
 

passdoubt

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407
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Wow, who would have thought that a study published by Fannie Mae, a corporation that uses the phrase "the American Dream of homeownership" in their company mantra, would find that exurban development is just an extension of a "natural" process that's been occuring for long now? ;-)
 

simulcra

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127
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6
Fannie Mae also published a report on how urban development is hot and the market is great for it. Along with gloating over figures of population surges in city downtowns from 1990 to 2000.

Home ownership comes in many forms.
 
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