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Defining the boundary of a core business district

luckless pedestrian

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So I have more than 5 different boundaries for my fair city - one for parking regulations area, one for a special assessment district, one for zoning, one for façade review and then a few historic districts

We all intuitively know the boundary of a core business district but if you had to explain it to an alien, what would you say were the criteria?
 

DVD

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We have one standard for our downtown area then several that cover our 1st ring suburbs which are loosely based on historic neighborhood boundaries. How we came up with that boundary I don't know, but I bet one of our historic planners could tell me. The hard part is our down town code that covers all those things has several maps you have to go by and street design sections. So you end up flipping pages to figure out basic things like height and density. Don't get me started on allowed uses.
 

Doohickie

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Fort Worth's downtown is defined by geographic/infrastructure features- I-30 to the south, train tracks to the east, and the Trinity River on the north and west. There are two problems with this though: The river swings way north as it flows east, and the Rock Island/Samuels Ave. neighborhood is clearly not downtown. And similarly on the west side, the river swings way west to the point that by the time it runs into I-30, you're nowhere near downtown. The Upper West Side is what they call the "part of downtown" that's too far from downtown to be downtown, but is still on the downtown side of the river.

Of course, people who live further out in the suburbs include a much larger area in their definition of downtown, including the West 7th area (across the river to the west) and the Near Southside up to a mile south of I-30. Those areas have very different zoning from downtown.
 

Gedunker

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Perhaps I should have written "dwellings" as I was referring to that place where dwelling structures become more common than business structures.
 
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