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Parking Definition of commercial vehicle

quailton

Member
Messages
6
Points
0
I am working on an amendment to our parking standards and needa definiton of "Commercial Vehicle", none seem to suffice for our intent. We want to prohibit the large trucks, heavy equipment, utility trailers associated with businesses, tow trucks, etcetera from parking in residential districts; however, we do not want to prohibit hte person who drives a company car or pick up from parking at home. We also have an issue with motor coaches or recreational vehicles, do any of you restrict theri storage on residnetial property? If so, do limit them based on size,weight, or number of axles?

Any suggestions are appreciated.
 

stroskey

Cyburbian
Messages
1,212
Points
17
I am working on an amendment to our parking standards and needa definiton of "Commercial Vehicle", none seem to suffice for our intent. We want to prohibit the large trucks, heavy equipment, utility trailers associated with businesses, tow trucks, etcetera from parking in residential districts; however, we do not want to prohibit hte person who drives a company car or pick up from parking at home. We also have an issue with motor coaches or recreational vehicles, do any of you restrict theri storage on residnetial property? If so, do limit them based on size,weight, or number of axles?

Any suggestions are appreciated.

We do not ban RVs from residential properties so long as they don't go over the sidewalk and they are not blocking a view from an intersection. Most older houses can not fit them on their driveways but the newer ones can.

We ban all vehicles over fourteen tons "with the primary purpose of conducting business activities" from residential properties or vehicles that require a CDL license. This includes any accessory use for such vehicle such as trailer. Exclusions are any pickup truck or van owned or operated by the resident that do not have commercial DOT tags.
 

Gedunker

Moderating
Staff member
Moderator
Messages
11,729
Points
45
We limit commercial vehicle parking at a residence to vehicles registered below 6,000 lbs. We do not prohibit RVs or campers, but require they be 1) unoccupied and 2) parked on a paved surface (e.g., no lawn parking).
 

NHPlanner

A shadow of my former self
Staff member
Moderator
Messages
10,139
Points
44
From APA's Planners Dictionary:

commercial vehicle:

  • Any motor vehicle, trailer, or semi-trailer designed or used to carry freight, passengers for a fee, or merchandise in the furtherance of any commercial enterprise and having a gross weight of more than 10,000 pounds. (Rock Hall, Md.)
  • Any vehicle bearing or required to bear commercial license plates and which falls into one or more of the categories listed below: (1) truck tractor; (2) semi-trailer, which shall include flat beds, stake beds, roll-off containers, tanker bodies, dump bodies and full or partial box-type enclosures; (3) vehicles of a type that are commonly used for the delivery of ice cream, milk, bread, fruit or similar vending supply commercial or delivery trucks. This category shall include vehicles of a similar nature which are also of a type commonly used by electrical, plumbing, heating and cooling, and other construction oriented contractors; (4) tow trucks; (5) commercial hauling trucks; (6) vehicle repair service trucks; (7) vehicles with blades attached for plowing, grading; (8) construction vehicle, such as a bulldozer, backhoe and similar vehicles; (9) a vehicle which has permanently mounted outside brackets or holders for ladders, tools, pipes, or other similar equipment. (Beverly Hills, Calif.)
  • A vehicle having a gross vehicle weight greater than one ton designed for transportation of commodities, merchandise, produce, freight, animals, or passengers, and operated in conjunction with a home occupation. (Loveland, Colo.)
  • Any self-propelled or towed vehicle used in commerce to transport passengers (other than the driver) or cargo. (Temple Terrace, Fla.)
  • Heavy machinery equipment, dump trucks, tractor and trailer rigs, either as one unit or separately, vehicles having more than two axles on the road, and similar vehicles not ordinarily used for personal transportation. (Russellville, Ark.)
 

mike gurnee

Cyburbian
Messages
3,066
Points
32
I have tried to limit them to side/rear yards with mixed results. On the street and in front yard areas for no more than 10 consecutive days. very hard to enforce.
 

developmentguru

Cyburbian
Messages
62
Points
4
Every vehicle, including motor vehicles and trailers, designed, maintained or used primarily for the nonrecreational transportation of property and/or people and the gross weight. of which exceeds three and one-half (3-1/2) tons. This definition shall never be construed to include motor vehicles commonly known as "pickup trucks".

Of course, I'll mention that this doesn't cover all the contractor trailers, and as it says, pickups. Tons of complaints about home-operated businesses (limb removal, contracting, painting, for example) but when we attempted to further limit the commercial vehicle definition to include these things....well, chaos ensued.

Good luck to you!
 

Streck

Cyburbian
Messages
610
Points
18
One more tool might be to cover any vehicle with a commercial (advertising) sign on it, or any vehicle required to have businees name, registration info and location posted on the side of the cab.
 

quailton

Member
Messages
6
Points
0
Thanks

Thanks everyone...these are all good. I am going to print the thread and discuss the most appropriate languuage wit hmy supervisor. ;)
 

Streck

Cyburbian
Messages
610
Points
18
I didn't address your question about storage of large vehicles.

We require overnight RV (or commercial vehicle) parking to be in a Side or Rear Yard or Buildable Area and to be behind a six foot high opaque fence, or in an enclosed garage.

We prohibit overnight RV parking on the street.
 

shell_waster

Cyburbian
Messages
243
Points
10
here is something that has worked well for my employer.

"10.08.010 - Parking of commercial vehicles in residential districts.

In all districts of the city zoned NR-1, NR-2, NR-3, CR and TCR, the parking of any commercial vehicle (other than an automobile, pickup truck, panel truck or van used to provide daily transportation to and from work; or a commercial vehicle parked temporarily while making a delivery or providing a service) and any vehicle identified by the Federal Highway Administration's Vehicle Inventory and Use Survey as having a gross vehicle weight rating class greater than "3" shall be prohibited except under the following circumstances:

1.Any vehicle may park in said zoning districts within a fully enclosed structure that meets all other criteria of the city building and zoning regulations for such districts as set forth in this code; and
2.Any government vehicle or other vehicle used for the primary purpose of transporting children to and from churches, synagogues, mosques, other religious institutions or state licensed or accredited schools may park in said districts provided such vehicle is parked off any public thoroughfare and in the side or rear yard of the driver's dwelling."

Class "3" vehicles have a minimum Gross Vehicle Weight Rating of 10,001 lbs and a maximum GVWR of 14,000 lbs
 

luluhead

Member
Messages
19
Points
1
we require a temporary use permit for RVs in the driveways. 7 days per permit max, it is free, can be issued max twice a year, has to comply with all traffic regs (such as not blocking the sidewalk), living inside is not allowed, and can be used only for uploading/unloading/cleaning before or after the trip. Permit has to be attached to a window of the RV for the code enf.

Has been working flawlessly since 1997...
 

mgk920

Cyburbian
Messages
4,202
Points
26
To further complicate things, here in Wisconsin, WisDOT makes no distinction between commercial and non-commercial uses in registering vehicles. For example, a pick-up truck is registered as a light truck, regardless of whether it is primarily used as a private vehicle or as a commercial vehicle - and many are used as both. Ditto cars, vans and sooves (I have seen some registered as light trucks when used commercially), etc. Registration of trucks in Wisconsin is by weight class.

Thus, here i\n Wisconsin, such a rule would have to be based on what weight class the vehicle is registered as or, if not registered in Wisconsin, what it would be registered as if it were to be plated in Wisconsin.

Mike
 

Streck

Cyburbian
Messages
610
Points
18
How does the average code enforcer know the weight of a given vehicle? Must he check the registration? Is there a tag in the window or a special indication on the license?

Wouldn't wheel base length be a convenient way to classify vehicles as "trucks" "vans" or other large obnoxius vehicles that are traffic hazards on dark streets or need to be hidden in buildings or behind fences?

If not wheel base length, what about number of wheels on the ground, or height of vehicle, or size of advertising?
 

mgk920

Cyburbian
Messages
4,202
Points
26
There are distinctions in the design, numbering and sticker patterns between the various weight classes of truck plates in Wisconsin. Consult the WisDOT website for the nitty-gritty. Also, many larger 'straight' trucks show their weight class in the data on their cabs. Wheelbase length is not very useful in this regard as, for example, there are rented limousines with veeeeeery long wheelbases while I've also seen commercial straight trucks with wheelbases shorter than those of most cars.

Many times, though, it would be a case-by-case 'he said/she said' judgment call.

Interesting Wisconsin 'case in point' - the six Oscar-Mayer 'Wienermobiles' are all registered in Wisconsin - as cars.

Mike
 

luckless pedestrian

Super Moderator
Staff member
Moderator
Messages
12,990
Points
54
Hey bringing back this thread - because so many people have heavier vehicles and trucks now as their personal vehicle, we are thinking of upping the ante on our regulations.

I am thinking of bringing it to 26,000 pounds (which sounds crazy) to be in line with the limit for commercial vehicles

Has anyone else been re-thinking this requirement due to the heavier truck as a personal vehicle thing or is that just a New England-y thing
 

Doohickie

Cyburbian
Messages
3,576
Points
46
It looks like our local code defines commercial vehicles as follows:
COMMERCIAL MOTOR VEHICLE.
(1) A motor vehicle, other than a motorcycle, designed or used primarily to transport property. The term includes a passenger car reconstructed and used primarily for delivery purposes; and
(2) A motor vehicle displaying the registrant’s name and address permanently affixed in characters at least three inches high on both sides of the vehicle, with such display being in a color contrasting with that of the vehicle and placed approximately midway vertically on doors or side panels.
OVERSIZE COMMERCIAL VEHICLE.
(1) Any vehicle designed for the transport of more than 15 passengers, inclusive of the driver;
(2) Any trailer or semi-trailer that is more than 20 feet in length from end to end, more than seven feet in width at their widest point, or more than nine feet in height from the ground to its highest point; or
(3) Any motor vehicle with a gross weight, registered weight or gross weight rating, as those terms are defined in state law, of more than 15,000 pounds, including but not limited to the following:
a. Dump truck;
b. Truck-tractor;
c. Concrete-mixing truck;
d. Stake-bed truck;
e. Flat-bed tow truck; or
f. Panel truck.
The Oversize Commercial definition is independent of the Commercial definition.
 
Last edited:

Dan

Dear Leader
Staff member
Moderator
Messages
19,147
Points
70
In my FBC work, I used 14,000 pounds as the maximum threshold for "vehicle repair: light". It's the upper gross vehicle weight rating limit of the US DOT medium duty classification group, class 3, which includes heavy duty pickups (Ford F-350/450, Ram 3500, etc.). ("Vehicle repair: heavy" is not a permitted use in TND/NU areas, because it uses a lot of land that we'd rather see go for more residential and small scale commercial uses, and can undermine walkable urbanism.)

According to the US DOT (and Wikipedia):
USDOT classDuty classificationWeight limitExamples
Class 1Light truck0–6,000 pounds (0–2,722 kg)Chevrolet Colorado/GMC Canyon, Ford Ranger, Honda Ridgeline FWD[8], Jeep Gladiator, Nissan Frontier, Toyota Tacoma
Class 2aLight truck6,001–8,500 pounds (2,722–3,856 kg)Chevrolet Silverado/GMC Sierra 1500, Ford F-150, Honda Ridgeline AWD, Nissan Titan, Ram 1500, Toyota Tundra
Class 2bLight/medium truck8,501–10,000 pounds (3,856–4,536 kg)Chevrolet Silverado/GMC Sierra 2500, Ford F-250, Nissan Titan XD, Ram 2500
Class 3Medium truck10,001–14,000 pounds (4,536–6,350 kg)Chevrolet Silverado/GMC Sierra 3500, Ford F-350, Ford F-450 (pickup only), Ram 3500, Isuzu NPR
Class 4Medium truck14,001–16,000 pounds (6,351–7,257 kg)Chevrolet Silverado 4500HD/International CV, Ford F-450 (chassis cab), Ram 450, Isuzu NPR-HD
Class 5Medium truck16,001–19,500 pounds (7,258–8,845 kg)Chevrolet Silverado 5500HD/International CV, Ford F-550, Ram 5500, Isuzu NRR, Freightliner Business Class M2 106, Kenworth T170, Peterbilt 325
Class 6Medium truck19,501–26,000 pounds (8,846–11,793 kg)Chevrolet Silverado 6500HD/International CV, Ford F-650, Freightliner Business Class M2 106, International MV, Kenworth T270, Peterbilt 330
Class 7Heavy truck26,001–33,000 pounds (11,794–14,969 kg)Autocar ACMD[13], Freightliner Business Class M2 106, Ford F-750, Hino 338, International MV, Kenworth K370, Kenworth T370 and T440/470, Mack MD, Peterbilt 220 and 337/348
Class 8Heavy truck33,001 pounds (14,969 kg) and aboveAutocar ACX and DC; Freightliner Cascadia, Business Class M2 112, 118SD, and EconicSD; Ford F-750; Hino XL8; International LT, HV, and RH; Kenworth T680, T880, and W990; Mack Anthem, Granite, Pinnacle, and TerraPro; Peterbilt 389, 579, and 520; Western Star 4800, 4900 and 5700

26,000 pounds is the limit of vehicles anyone can drive with just a regular license. Still, Class 2 includes some sizeable commercial vehicles, like the Freightliner M2.

freightliner.jpg


An earlier draft of the UDC I was working on had some other traits for "commercial vehicle". This included trucks with utility beds, yard trucks, utility and box trailers, construction equipment, and the like.
 
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